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Rigid Fork vs Susp Fork on Road/Light Trail Bike

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Rigid Fork vs Susp Fork on Road/Light Trail Bike

Old 05-15-24, 06:54 PM
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You could make a small lever that fit into a pedal as if it were a shoe cleat to hold the bike up with the crank at the proper position and carry it in your jersey.
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Old 05-16-24, 12:55 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
Very long and involved story but I ended up not getting the Orbea. The short version is that two friends staged an intervention and steered me to an entirely different bike. Fortunately, the Orbea build had not gone to the point of no return and the money was refunded. My new bike is promised within 7-10 days and is fully paid for and non-refundable at this point.

Pics when it comes.

The shop will be replacing the stock tires with 700x38 Marathon Plus, a choice which elicited consternation from my salesman. I have also discovered that I cannot put a kickstand on a carbon fiber bike, it's just not done. There are no mounting holes and one cannot clamp things to carbon fiber. This fact does not exactly instill confidence in the durability of carbon fiber
So what’s the new bike?? For the record, the Trek FX 6 you originally mentioned has a kickstand mount
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Old 05-16-24, 02:14 AM
  #103  
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Originally Posted by NumbersGuy
You seem to be very all over the place with your new bike purchase. I think you really need to figure out what you want first rather than panning to buy Bike A, then Bike B, then ordering Bike C, then what tire should you use, now maybe you should get a suspension fork on the MTB that you're not even using as a MTB. Next you'll somehow change your order to a downhill bike and ask about putting tubulars on it...

I'd suggest you first figure out what exactly you want this bike to do well, then determine what type of frame, fork, component and tire setup fits those needs and then narrow down bikes that fit those criteria.
Looks like we are on bike D now 😂
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Old 05-16-24, 06:30 AM
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The saga is over. Used info from here and friends who intervened on the Orbea. Bought paid for no touchbacks.

Got $700 off

Will post pic when I pick it up.

Last edited by MikeDeason; 05-16-24 at 06:35 AM.
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Old 05-16-24, 08:45 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
Very long and involved story but I ended up not getting the Orbea. The short version is that two friends staged an intervention and steered me to an entirely different bike. Fortunately, the Orbea build had not gone to the point of no return and the money was refunded. My new bike is promised within 7-10 days and is fully paid for and non-refundable at this point.

Pics when it comes.

The shop will be replacing the stock tires with 700x38 Marathon Plus, a choice which elicited consternation from my salesman. I have also discovered that I cannot put a kickstand on a carbon fiber bike, it's just not done. There are no mounting holes and one cannot clamp things to carbon fiber. This fact does not exactly instill confidence in the durability of carbon fiber
So, on to yet another bike, and again you picked something that doesn't meet your requirements and you're not confident in, except now it's at the no refunds stage... Great Job!!!

And you're still refusing to take advice from those who know more than you about tires... Double Great Job!!!
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Old 05-16-24, 08:48 AM
  #106  
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Originally Posted by 70sSanO
That eeSilk is pretty cool. I hadn’t seen that before.

The lockout is a nice feature for smooth surfaces.

John
Yeah, it works great. The bars do move down under braking, particularly on downhills. not enough to be an issue, but certainly enough for the dark recesses of my mind to start telling me something is not right!

Cane Creek is going to release an upside down fork this summer that looks really attractive. Well see.
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Old 05-16-24, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
Very long and involved story but I ended up not getting the Orbea. The short version is that two friends staged an intervention and steered me to an entirely different bike. Fortunately, the Orbea build had not gone to the point of no return and the money was refunded. My new bike is promised within 7-10 days and is fully paid for and non-refundable at this point.

Pics when it comes.

The shop will be replacing the stock tires with 700x38 Marathon Plus, a choice which elicited consternation from my salesman. I have also discovered that I cannot put a kickstand on a carbon fiber bike, it's just not done. There are no mounting holes and one cannot clamp things to carbon fiber. This fact does not exactly instill confidence in the durability of carbon fiber
Really has nothing to do with durability of carbon (and I am steel fan) but more to the design of the bike.....few high end bikes,no matter what material, are designed to have the clamping forces of a kick stand.
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Old 05-16-24, 02:33 PM
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Did not know that either. I’ve just always had a kickstand. Very handy accessory. So you could not even clamp one on a high end steel bike ?

I had one clamped on a cheap Norco hybrid bike for 20yrs. No damage. And I have one on my current aluminum commuter
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Old 05-16-24, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
Did not know that either. I’ve just always had a kickstand. Very handy accessory. So you could not even clamp one on a high end steel bike ?

You can, but you will deform the chain stays.
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Old 05-16-24, 02:59 PM
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So long term will having a clamped kickstand f up this bike?

This is my current, soon to be wife’s , commuter hybrid IGH belt drive


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Old 05-16-24, 04:34 PM
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Seems like a fine bike for a kickstand. I’d use something with a thicker top plate that won’t bend easily, like a Greenfield kickstand, and be careful to get it tight enough but not too tight.
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Old 05-16-24, 06:01 PM
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so I can clamp a kickstand on my (relatively) cheap hybrid aluminum bike and I had one bolted to a $300 Norco for 20yrs but on my new cf bike, I risk damaging the bike.

huh

Last edited by MikeDeason; 05-16-24 at 06:06 PM.
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Old 05-16-24, 06:37 PM
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What carbon bike is this? Sounds like it's just as ill suited for commuting as the original Orbea.
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Old 05-16-24, 06:48 PM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
so I can clamp a kickstand on my (relatively) cheap hybrid aluminum bike and I had one bolted to a $300 Norco for 20yrs but on my new cf bike, I risk damaging the bike.

huh
Yes, mainly because production of (and demand for) CF commuter bikes is almost nonexistent. It can be done (like the FX Sport) but most carbon bikes prioritize low weight over provisions for things like kickstands and racks.
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Old 05-16-24, 08:44 PM
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Still being coy about the new bike.
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Old 05-16-24, 10:13 PM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
So long term will having a clamped kickstand f up this bike?

This is my current, soon to be wife’s , commuter hybrid IGH belt drive


Long term, probably to some degree. , if you really crank down on the bolt (which often happens to keep stand from getting loose and flopping around, then you can start getting into crushing tubes. not a big deal with thick 4130 tubes, more of a deal with oversized aluminum tubes and high end (thinner) tubes

this type seems to use less pressure, but I would still not use on anything high end

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Old 05-17-24, 02:37 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
so I can clamp a kickstand on my (relatively) cheap hybrid aluminum bike and I had one bolted to a $300 Norco for 20yrs but on my new cf bike, I risk damaging the bike.

huh
Yes, cheap metal bikes with heavy, thick wall tubing can deal very easily with clamping forces. Carbon (or any higher end bike where weight is a focus) have their structure designed for strength in the amounts and directions where needed, compliance in areas where desired and reduced weight wherever possible. Beefing up chainstays to support the loads exerted when clamping (and often over tightening) a kickstand are not in line with the goals of a higher end bike.

i hate to break it to you, but you shouldn’t be buying a higher end bike. Your “huh” comment clarifies that even now that you’ve gone through discussions about 4 bikes you were planning to buy and are getting good info and advice from many sources, you’re incapable of or refuse to gain any understanding before making purchase decisions.
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Old 05-17-24, 03:37 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
Did not know that either. I’ve just always had a kickstand. Very handy accessory. So you could not even clamp one on a high end steel bike ?

I had one clamped on a cheap Norco hybrid bike for 20yrs. No damage. And I have one on my current aluminum commuter
Just because the stays haven't (yet) cracked doesn't mean they haven't deformed.

Use of the common center mount kickstand wasn't a problem back when nearly all bike frames were built with thick-wall, heavy high-tensile steel. It was only when lightweight frames built with thin-wall steel tubing started being sold in great numbers that kickstands were seen to crush the chain stays.

The damage is potentially even worse with the aluminum tubing used in better bikes. (The cheap thick-wall aluminum tubing used in Walmart-level bikes can usually withstand the clamping force of a kickstand pretty well.)

I used to see such damage often when I worked in bike stores - most often on aluminum bikes, but frequently on steel bikes, too. Here's a Surly blog post responding to people who complained to them about kickstand clamps damaging the chain stays on Long Haul Truckers.
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Old 05-17-24, 05:29 AM
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Originally Posted by NumbersGuy

i hate to break it to you, but you shouldn’t be buying a higher end bike.
He may have taken this to heart. Remains to be seen what, if anything has been "bought and paid for." Again....
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Old 05-17-24, 05:48 AM
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I just find a dichotomy between the fact the frame can withstand the weight of a rider over harsh terrain and not a kickstand.

yes. I bought a cf bike . I’ll post a pic within 14 days.
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Old 05-17-24, 05:52 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
so I can clamp a kickstand on my (relatively) cheap hybrid aluminum bike and I had one bolted to a $300 Norco for 20yrs but on my new cf bike, I risk damaging the bike.

huh
Yep, your cheap aluminium hybrid is probably a better choice for use with a kickstand. A bit like using a tow hitch is better on an old truck rather than a supercar.

So what have you finally bought? So far we know it has a carbon frame and you will have to get used to not using a kickstand.
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Old 05-17-24, 06:29 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
I just find a dichotomy between the fact the frame can withstand the weight of a rider over harsh terrain and not a kickstand.

yes. I bought a cf bike . I’ll post a pic within 14 days.
Maybe it is because the entire frame is designed to work as a unit, and is designed to bear specific loads at specific locations ... and the chainstays are Not designed for localized stress mid-tube ..... If you really thought about it you would see.

Think how thin the seat stays are on some bikes .... they are designed to bear relatively small loads, and even to flex a little to absorb shock .... but look at the junction of the down tubes, chainstays and bottom bracket .... thick and meaty .... The strength is where it needs to be .... and if the chainstay was not designed for a kickstand, that extra load where it is not intended to be, could overstress the specific spot.
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Old 05-17-24, 06:42 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
I just find a dichotomy between the fact the frame can withstand the weight of a rider over harsh terrain and not a kickstand.

yes. I bought a cf bike . I’ll post a pic within 14 days.
There’s a pretty drastic difference between your weight balanced and spread over the entire bike, and a kickstand clamping a 1” section of the chainstays with significant force.

I’m curious why the mechanic doesn’t want to install your chosen tires. Is it because they’re the wrong size for your rims?
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Old 05-17-24, 07:01 AM
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Size is good. The bike comes with a 700x40mm tire and a tubeless set up which the salesman seemed keen on.

Two reasons I switched tires. One, the included tires got a horrible review on a website that appears very thorough and reputable. Second, and more importantly, I don’t want to deal with sealant maintenance. The bike will be kept in a lean-to year round which I would imagine necessitates more frequent sealant checks.

I want the set it and forget it, no stress tire set-up, the Marathon Plus promise.
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Old 05-17-24, 08:12 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
Size is good. The bike comes with a 700x40mm tire and a tubeless set up which the salesman seemed keen on.

Two reasons I switched tires. One, the included tires got a horrible review on a website that appears very thorough and reputable. Second, and more importantly, I don’t want to deal with sealant maintenance. The bike will be kept in a lean-to year round which I would imagine necessitates more frequent sealant checks.

I want the set it and forget it, no stress tire set-up, the Marathon Plus promise.
Makes sense to me. Some will complain about the weight and ride quality of the Marathon plus, but if durability and longevity are your priorities then it really can’t be beat. And I wouldn’t bother with tubeless for a hybrid/commuter bike either.
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