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Geared bikes or single speed?

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Geared bikes or single speed?

Old 05-19-24, 09:01 AM
  #101  
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I just took down a Specialized Langster, a single speed/fixie that has been hanging in my garage for years and years. I don't even know what year it is but it is a least twelve years old and in like-new condition. I put some Gatorskins 25mm on it., adjusted a few things to suit my current riding style, and off I went. I had a lot of fun riding this bike. Five pounds lighter than my 2022 Trek Checkpoint, I really enjoyed not shifting. On the downside, the ride was very harsh compared to my two other bikes, the Checkpoint and the Domane. But it was fun for a change to ride something different and the bike feels very fast. Better for shorter rides, say 10-15 miles, I plan on using it in the rotation of bikes I ride.
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Old 05-19-24, 10:52 AM
  #102  
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Why not buy one and find out for yourself. If you buy a used bike locally you can sell it for pretty much what you paid. It's funny how our perceptions change once we experience something for our selves. I sometimes over think things trying to justify my purchase.

While I don't plan on buying one anytime soon, I might enjoy a simple single speed bike as a recreational cyclist. If I where commuting 15 km to work, I would choose at least a 3 speed hybrid bike. I ride an 21 speed (9 of which are redundant) comfort bike now. Part of the comfort equation is having the perfect gear for every situation I encounter.

Where I live it's mostly flat land, the biggest obstacle here is ridding on windy days. My first bike was 24" single speed as a kid, Moving upscale to a 3 speed "Mustang" bike with a console shift was a real treat.

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Old 05-19-24, 05:44 PM
  #103  
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Originally Posted by jackb
I just took down a Specialized Langster, a single speed/fixie that has been hanging in my garage for years and years. I don't even know what year it is but it is a least twelve years old and in like-new condition. I put some Gatorskins 25mm on it., adjusted a few things to suit my current riding style, and off I went. I had a lot of fun riding this bike. Five pounds lighter than my 2022 Trek Checkpoint, I really enjoyed not shifting. On the downside, the ride was very harsh compared to my two other bikes, the Checkpoint and the Domane. But it was fun for a change to ride something different and the bike feels very fast. Better for shorter rides, say 10-15 miles, I plan on using it in the rotation of bikes I ride.
Seems like the Langster has limited tire clearance. Too bad, that could help the harsh ride. I have 32mm GP5K on my Detroit Bikes Sparrow fixed gear and, while not as buttery smooth as my Domane, it's pretty comfortable even on all-day rides.
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Old 05-19-24, 06:07 PM
  #104  
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Originally Posted by downtube42
Seems like the Langster has limited tire clearance. Too bad, that could help the harsh ride. I have 32mm GP5K on my Detroit Bikes Sparrow fixed gear and, while not as buttery smooth as my Domane, it's pretty comfortable even on all-day rides.
After putting the tire on I see that I probably could have got on 28mm, which would have been a little better. I don't think I could get 30mm or more on. Oh well, it's fun to ride anyway.
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Old 05-20-24, 10:38 AM
  #105  
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What the hell, I'll give wax a try. Worst that can happen is the chain will get "sticky"; wont' bend easily, and I'll notice that.
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Old 05-20-24, 03:11 PM
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Depends how flat the area is that you’re biking imo. I’m in Toronto and run a single speed at a 46x17 ratio on 28s. If it was any hillier it wouldn’t be ideal. Internal hubs would be a good choice in the city as well - even a 3 speed internal hub would be solid.
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Old 05-20-24, 09:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Smaug1
What the hell, I'll give wax a try. Worst that can happen is the chain will get "sticky"; wont' bend easily, and I'll notice that.
Pivoting at the pins, it can be sticky around the derailleur pulleys for about 30 seconds after initial waxing, but that clears up really fast. Lateral flexibility is more dependent on outer plate gap, and I've yet to find any guidance on that on sheldon brown or other. Until I know different, I go for smallest gap possible while still pivoting freely.
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Old 05-20-24, 09:44 PM
  #108  
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Originally Posted by Smaug1
What the hell, I'll give wax a try. Worst that can happen is the chain will get "sticky"; wont' bend easily, and I'll notice that.
Worst thing that can happen is you become a waxing fanboy
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Old 05-20-24, 10:19 PM
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Originally Posted by downtube42
Worst thing that can happen is you become a waxing fanboy
If not, they'll say he did it wrong. Clean three times in fresh solvent, then a final rinse in Smirnoff vodka and dry in direct sun, then melt the wax but don't get a drop of water in the wax or on the chain, what, you didn't do this?
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Old 05-21-24, 05:18 AM
  #110  
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Used to have my fixed vintage steel for many years. rebuilt into a 16 speed downtube frictionless racer. love it
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