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Best budget bike tool set?

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Best budget bike tool set?

Old 05-16-24, 11:17 AM
  #26  
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Go to Walmart and get a set of metric Allen wrenches and a flat and 4 way screwdriver. Buy pair of Park tools cable cutters and you can add the other bike specific tools as needed. If you buy a kit you will pay a premium for those small cheap tools available everywhere and the specifics may not even fit your bike. If I was made of money, I might drop a grand on a good Park tools kit, but I would likely never use some of the tools.
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Old 05-16-24, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by smd4
And now I think I need a pliers wrench.
Haha, ditto.

This is also useful if a person doesn't have really good screwdrivers.
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Old 05-16-24, 12:50 PM
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high quality metric allen set, very slim needle nose pliers, torque wrench that can do single digit tolerances, BB service tools for your specific setup, bicycle work stand, chain breaker, chain whip. That'll be good to start with. Buy the rest as you need it.
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Old 05-16-24, 01:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Koyote
Haha, ditto.

This is also useful if a person doesn't have really good screwdrivers.
The article is behind a paywall, and the farthest I can read before it blacks out suggests that while JIS isn't obsolete, it's been rolled into an international standard.

I have a JIS No. 2, which seems to fit everything from the smallest derailleur limit screws to much larger Phillips heads around the house. Almost like a one-size-fits-all, and it fits everything really well!
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Old 05-16-24, 01:35 PM
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For turning derailleur limit screws, I use an old JIS screwdriver (which came with my mom's first Datsun and is thus almost as old as I am) or the orange + screwdriver that comes with Ring cameras; they work equally well.
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Old 05-16-24, 09:57 PM
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My first tool kit was like the one pictured above. For the most part the tools worked fine, and when a tool wore out or was not sufficient, I purchased a higher quality replacement.
It will also give you an idea of what you need and don't
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Old 05-17-24, 12:39 AM
  #32  
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I got a “Bike Hand” too set from Amazon for about $40, and have used it to build 3 bikes. The tools aren’t Snap-On quality, but they are good enough to get the job done. The only tool the kit didn’t include was a cable cutter, but I still have a good Park cutter which works beautifully.
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Old 05-17-24, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by smd4
I've posted this before, and I'm not sure it meets the "budget" requirement, but still think it's a pretty good list of tools that would be useful in most home shops:

I'll preface this by saying you may already have a lot of these tools in your home tool box. Also, lots of these tools might not be necessary for modern bikes. Allen keys, for example, seem to have been replaced by Torx. Anyway...

--Set of metric open/box end wrenches up to 17mm;
--12" adjustable ("Crescent") wrench;
--Ball-peen hammer;
--Metal shop ruler (to measure chain stretch, etc.);
--Needle-nose pliers (to grab the cable when adjusting derailleur cable length);
--JIS (Japanese) Phillips head screwdriver, probably No. 2 will cover you in most instances;
--Hex/Allen Tri-wrench in 4, 5, 6 mm (Without doubt the most useful tool in my toolbox);
--Socket Tri-wrench in 8, 9, 10 mm;
--Torx Tri-wrench (I have one but don't use it, because I don't have any Torx fasteners);
--Pedal Wrench (I have an older (Verma?) model that has both 15mm and 1/2" at either end);
--Set of good quality cone wrenches (I use Park);
--High-quality spoke wrench to fit your spoke nipples. Park makes these. Get the kind that looks like a hot-air-balloon with rubber grip. Don't cheap out on this tool!;
--Headset wrench specific to your headset if you use one. Park makes these as well;
--Chain Whip;
--Cassette lockring tool depending on cassette manufacturer (This will be used in conjunction with your chain whip and adjustable wrench);
--Bottom-bracket tools, depending on what you're using and the era;
--Fourth hand (Hozan makes the best one);
--Quality bike-cable-specific cable cutters (I use a discontinued Shimano version but the newer Park one seems quite capable--and the high-end Knipex from Germany are amazing and feature a cool cable end crimper);
--Metric Allen key set (the "L" shaped ones);
--Chain Tool (type depending on what you use--rivets, quick links, etc.);
--Tools specific to your bike--I need an extra long 6mm Allen key for my stem and an 8mm Allen for my cranks. I also have a specific tool for my chainring bolts and crank dust caps, and one to adjust my pedal bearings;
--Good quality oil (your choice; I use Tri-Flow);
--Good quality grease (your choice; I use Shimano Special Grease. Phil is good too);
--Good quality floor pump including good-quality chuck for your particular valves (I use a Silca Pista Plus with Hiro chuck for Presta valves);
--Tire valve core tool (I think these would be used if you are tubeless and need to remove the valve core);
--Decent floor stand if your bike can be lifted into one;
--Torque wrench if you're dealing with a lot of CF that requires specific torques, or you just don't trust yourself. A beam type should suffice.

Fun tools but completely unnecessary: Angle gauge; digital bike (expensive) or luggage (cheap) scale; digital caliper.

This list is what I can think of off the top of my head, but should be a good start for most home shops. YMMV. There are of course very specialized tools like dropout alignment tools, headset cup and race removers/installers, etc. These can be pricy and not used very often, but many can be fabricated at home. I may add to this list as I think of things.
Wow! This seems a solid list. I also vouch for the torque wrench if any of the parts you are going to touch are carbon fiber since you do not want to break them.
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Old 05-18-24, 01:22 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by smd4
The article is behind a paywall, and the farthest I can read before it blacks out suggests that while JIS isn't obsolete, it's been rolled into an international standard.

I have a JIS No. 2, which seems to fit everything from the smallest derailleur limit screws to much larger Phillips heads around the house. Almost like a one-size-fits-all, and it fits everything really well!
I did some research on Philips / JIS a while back when working out what I wanted in a saddle bag tool kit.
This article seems quite good: https://bike.bikegremlin.com/10583/p...s-vs-pozidriv/

In the end I got a bit set that includes JIS / Phillips / Pozi drive / Torx / Hex: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Laser-8316-...5RZ/ref=sr_1_3
With that selection you've always got the right bit, but apparently you can just use JIS all the time (and it's better).

You can also get mini handles: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sealey-AK69...52/ref=sr_1_58
that will fit in a saddle bag.
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