Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Best budget bike tool set?

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Best budget bike tool set?

Old 05-15-24, 03:03 PM
  #1  
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2024
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Best budget bike tool set?

I have basic hand tools but very little bike specifically tools is there a good decent starter kit
Oldrocker is offline  
Old 05-15-24, 03:11 PM
  #2  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 126
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Liked 60 Times in 27 Posts
I you just want to do basic adjustments, small screw drivers and metric Allen keys will suffice. If you want to do more elaborate maintenance, Park Tool makes a good starter kit.
hayden52 is offline  
Old 05-15-24, 03:19 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2023
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 633
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 404 Post(s)
Liked 315 Times in 203 Posts
You know that best and budget work against each other.....
ScottCommutes is offline  
Old 05-15-24, 03:21 PM
  #4  
I'm good to go!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 15,343

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 53 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6383 Post(s)
Liked 4,981 Times in 3,429 Posts
In the long run you'll probably be better off buying them as you need them if you are just DIYing your own bikes and maybe a few others. If you try to buy them ahead of time, you might be buying something you'll never use. I've got quite a few $20-$30 tools that I've only used once and some never. Cone wrenches might be nice if you regularly deal with cup and cone axle bearings. But when I got my last bike with cartridge bearings, I haven't had the need to use them in over four years so far.

If you are going into the bike mechanic business, that might be a different consideration.
Iride01 is offline  
Old 05-15-24, 03:37 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 6,041

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3662 Post(s)
Liked 3,098 Times in 1,867 Posts
Originally Posted by hayden52
If you want to do more elaborate maintenance, Park Tool makes a good starter kit.
I bet you could get most of those tools for less than $200!
smd4 is offline  
Likes For smd4:
Old 05-15-24, 03:47 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2023
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 633
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 404 Post(s)
Liked 315 Times in 203 Posts
Many years ago, a trade school by me would run TV commercials. Their pitch was that as you learned each tool, you would add it to your box. You would graduate and keep all the tools you trained on.

I like this approach. By yourself a medium-size tool box (for portability). Buy the individual tools you need for your specific bike as you need them and add them to your box. I would also recommend duplicating stuff like screwdrivers/wrenches/hex/etc so that you keep dedicated ones in your bike box (you don't need to keep a 17mm combination wrench in your bike box). Keep your other basics in the box as well - a spare chain, chain oil, tubes, tri-flow, etc. A lot of tools can be purchased for really cheap on Amazon. You can always upgrade later.

I would recommend a box with some kind of compartments or something because a lot of the common tools are small and sink to the bottom of the kit..
ScottCommutes is offline  
Old 05-15-24, 03:51 PM
  #7  
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 14,019

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Phil Wood Apple VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), R+M Supercharger2 Rohloff, Habanero Ti 26

Mentioned: 56 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4523 Post(s)
Liked 4,229 Times in 2,829 Posts
So buy the best tools you can for what you need. For the basic stuff you are using the most get the really good stuff and the less you use something to a point get something a little cheaper. Park Tool or Pedro's makes decent enthusiast tools and some professional tools.

In the end don't buy a tool kit buy each tool piecemeal so you can get the best tools for the job. Cheap tools are only for the richest people on the planet as they can afford to buy new tools frequently and replace damaged parts no problem. Someone who doesn't have as much money should strive to buy the best tools possible from known quantities and qualities. There was a couple years ago a thread we had about hex wrenches (sometimes known by a brand name of Allen wrenches) and the difference in quality and the reason to buy the quality ones.

My toolbox is a mix of Snap-On, Wera, PB-Swiss, Abbey, Park Tool, Pedros, Shimano and some other specialty stuff like Rohloff and Gates (which you probably won't need) in the end you could skip the Snap-On as that stuff can get quite expensive and is less needed because Wera makes some great stuff and will come out a bit cheaper or even Park Tool will be reasonable for some of that stuff.
veganbikes is offline  
Old 05-15-24, 03:52 PM
  #8  
Method to My Madness
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 3,887

Bikes: Trek FX 2, Cannondale Synapse x2, Cannondale CAAD4, Santa Cruz Stigmata 3

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2081 Post(s)
Liked 1,568 Times in 1,086 Posts
Originally Posted by Oldrocker
I have basic hand tools ...
By basic hand tools I assume you have Philips screwdrivers of various sizes as well as hex keys from 2 mm through 8 mm? If so, that is a good start. You may also want to identify one or two typical bikes that you would work on the most, and whether they have hydraulic disc brakes.

Originally Posted by Iride01
In the long run you'll probably be better off buying them as you need them if you are just DIYing your own bikes and maybe a few others. ...
Totally agreed. Although a cassette tool, a cassette wrench, and a torque wrench are good to have, the latter especially for CF frames and components.
SoSmellyAir is offline  
Old 05-15-24, 03:56 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2023
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 633
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 404 Post(s)
Liked 315 Times in 203 Posts
Three important items that don't fit in a box are a pump, a wheel truing stand, and a bicycle repair stand.
ScottCommutes is offline  
Likes For ScottCommutes:
Old 05-15-24, 04:23 PM
  #10  
Method to My Madness
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 3,887

Bikes: Trek FX 2, Cannondale Synapse x2, Cannondale CAAD4, Santa Cruz Stigmata 3

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2081 Post(s)
Liked 1,568 Times in 1,086 Posts
Originally Posted by veganbikes
My toolbox is a mix of Snap-On, Wera, PB-Swiss, Abbey, Park Tool, Pedros, Shimano and ...
To this list I would add Unior: Collections Unior USA, based on my experience with its Y tool (4, 5, and 6 mm hex), its cassette tools (for both QR and 12 mm thru axles), and its cassette wrench
SoSmellyAir is offline  
Likes For SoSmellyAir:
Old 05-15-24, 04:43 PM
  #11  
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2024
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Ty everyone

Ty everyone
Oldrocker is offline  
Old 05-15-24, 04:55 PM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2021
Location: SoCal
Posts: 2,510

Bikes: Cuevas Custom, Cimmaron, 1988 "Pinalized Rockma", 1984 Trek 510, Moulton custom touring, Raleigh Competition GS, Bridgestone Mb-2 & 3, 1980's Peugeot - US, City, & Canyon Express (6)

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1169 Post(s)
Liked 4,097 Times in 1,979 Posts
I agree with previous posts, buy what you need, when you need it and build up a kit of tools. I am still assembling my kit as I work on different bikes. I have been finding tools here and there at garage sales, swap meets & auctions. I have not exactly been following my own advice, but generally agree to "buy the best you can afford, cheaper in the long run"

I got a Bikehand kit used on Craigslist for a very good price. For the price, it worked out great, if I bought it at retail I would be kicking myself
It provided me with some tools I use regularly - Cable cutter, Chain rivet extractor, Chain link tool, Freewheel turner/Pedal wrench
But, did not have many of the tools I need - Cone wrenches, spanners, BB tools for older bikes, free wheel tool for older bikes, T.A. specialties crank remover, headset wrench
The kit also has tools I don't & won't need, mainly things for newer bikes. - Bottom bracket wrench (modern), Cartridge Bottom bracket tool, I haven't used the torque wrenches yet
Also included things I already had - Hex wrenches, Torx wrenches, Screwdriver, Crank puller, Tire levers

SoCaled is offline  
Old 05-15-24, 05:33 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2023
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 633
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 404 Post(s)
Liked 315 Times in 203 Posts
Originally Posted by SoCaled
This picture reminded me that in any tool situation, your system of organization is important. I would get a lot more done with a meticulously organized drawer of Harbor Freight sockets than a shoe box full of Snap-on sockets all mixed together. I also wouldn't lose any.
ScottCommutes is offline  
Old 05-15-24, 06:17 PM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 8,173
Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7163 Post(s)
Liked 11,367 Times in 4,858 Posts
Originally Posted by hayden52
I you just want to do basic adjustments, small screw drivers and metric Allen keys will suffice. If you want to do more elaborate maintenance, Park Tool makes a good starter kit.
That is really not the collection of tools I would recommend to someone who is new to wrenching on bikes.

Here is an interesting article by Dave Rome, who is an actual bike mechanic. He gives his recommendations for a starter tool kit, and it seems pretty sensible. Rome now writes at Escape Collective about a variety of topics, including tools of all sorts; if you're into such things, it's interesting content. He's already cost me a bit of money.

Last edited by Koyote; 05-15-24 at 06:21 PM.
Koyote is online now  
Old 05-16-24, 06:32 AM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 6,041

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3662 Post(s)
Liked 3,098 Times in 1,867 Posts
I've posted this before, and I'm not sure it meets the "budget" requirement, but still think it's a pretty good list of tools that would be useful in most home shops:

I'll preface this by saying you may already have a lot of these tools in your home tool box. Also, lots of these tools might not be necessary for modern bikes. Allen keys, for example, seem to have been replaced by Torx. Anyway...

--Set of metric open/box end wrenches up to 17mm;
--12" adjustable ("Crescent") wrench;
--Ball-peen hammer;
--Metal shop ruler (to measure chain stretch, etc.);
--Needle-nose pliers (to grab the cable when adjusting derailleur cable length);
--JIS (Japanese) Phillips head screwdriver, probably No. 2 will cover you in most instances;
--Hex/Allen Tri-wrench in 4, 5, 6 mm (Without doubt the most useful tool in my toolbox);
--Socket Tri-wrench in 8, 9, 10 mm;
--Torx Tri-wrench (I have one but don't use it, because I don't have any Torx fasteners);
--Pedal Wrench (I have an older (Verma?) model that has both 15mm and 1/2" at either end);
--Set of good quality cone wrenches (I use Park);
--High-quality spoke wrench to fit your spoke nipples. Park makes these. Get the kind that looks like a hot-air-balloon with rubber grip. Don't cheap out on this tool!;
--Headset wrench specific to your headset if you use one. Park makes these as well;
--Chain Whip;
--Cassette lockring tool depending on cassette manufacturer (This will be used in conjunction with your chain whip and adjustable wrench);
--Bottom-bracket tools, depending on what you're using and the era;
--Fourth hand (Hozan makes the best one);
--Quality bike-cable-specific cable cutters (I use a discontinued Shimano version but the newer Park one seems quite capable--and the high-end Knipex from Germany are amazing and feature a cool cable end crimper);
--Metric Allen key set (the "L" shaped ones);
--Chain Tool (type depending on what you use--rivets, quick links, etc.);
--Tools specific to your bike--I need an extra long 6mm Allen key for my stem and an 8mm Allen for my cranks. I also have a specific tool for my chainring bolts and crank dust caps, and one to adjust my pedal bearings;
--Good quality oil (your choice; I use Tri-Flow);
--Good quality grease (your choice; I use Shimano Special Grease. Phil is good too);
--Good quality floor pump including good-quality chuck for your particular valves (I use a Silca Pista Plus with Hiro chuck for Presta valves);
--Tire valve core tool (I think these would be used if you are tubeless and need to remove the valve core);
--Decent floor stand if your bike can be lifted into one;
--Torque wrench if you're dealing with a lot of CF that requires specific torques, or you just don't trust yourself. A beam type should suffice.

Fun tools but completely unnecessary: Angle gauge; digital bike (expensive) or luggage (cheap) scale; digital caliper.

This list is what I can think of off the top of my head, but should be a good start for most home shops. YMMV. There are of course very specialized tools like dropout alignment tools, headset cup and race removers/installers, etc. These can be pricy and not used very often, but many can be fabricated at home. I may add to this list as I think of things.

Last edited by smd4; 05-16-24 at 10:02 AM.
smd4 is offline  
Old 05-16-24, 07:04 AM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,732

Bikes: too many sparkly Italians, some sweet Americans and a couple interesting Japanese

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 575 Post(s)
Liked 619 Times in 427 Posts
When my 3 daughters moved I bought then tool kits to handle simple essential tasks, now that I had a granddaughter heading out I bought her this from Amazon:https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0BK553HZK...n-monetizer-20 and was pleased with the quality.
One of my son-in-laws is very mechanical and he has used the tool kit I gave his wife as a travel tool box as I now do, back in 2020 I bought this because I did not like unloading and then reloading my tool chests for travel as snow birds and am very happy except I have seen it on sale for $100 less than I paid:Feedback Sports Team Edition Tool Kit
easyupbug is offline  
Old 05-16-24, 07:13 AM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Sin City, Nevada
Posts: 2,898

Bikes: Catrike 700, Greenspeed GTO trike, , Linear LWB recumbent, Haluzak Horizon SWB recumbent, Balance 450 MTB, Cannondale SM800 Beast of the East

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 523 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 233 Times in 185 Posts
basic set for $38 with free shipping

I bought individual bike tools one at a time over the years as I needed them. If I were starting out I would buy a basic tool kit on eBay like this one for $38 https://www.ebay.com/itm/175149429479. It looks like it has all of the tools I have used in the last decade. Neither you nor I are professional bike mechanics so we don't need to have every tool you might have to use in a bike shop.
VegasTriker is offline  
Old 05-16-24, 07:16 AM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 8,998

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2649 Post(s)
Liked 2,004 Times in 1,256 Posts
I'm mostly in agreement with the "buy 'em as you need 'em" school of thought. Decent quality tools, as opposed to the cheapest you can afford to buy all at once, make a huge difference in use. You can also add nice tools to your Christmas and birthday lists, like my daughter bought me a very nice Wera hex key set a few years back. A "buy it all at once" set is likely to have tools you don't need, and it'll probably miss one or two things you want. (E.g., I don't think I have a Torx bolt on any of my bikes. Some bikes are heading towards mostly Torx.)

You'll want to buy a good cable cutter, at least Pedro's or similar level. You can also spend twice that much. You'll want a chain tool that's a Park CT 3.x, unless you enjoy frustration using a smaller tool. There's a big difference between the $7.50 "fits all spokes" spoke wrench and a good one that fits your bike's spokes. If you have cup and cone hub bearings, you'll pat yourself on the back after you upgrade to Park SCW-15 cone wrenches from the double-ended bare metal starter wrenches.

It's probably also a good idea to keep an eye out for sales on some specialty tools, like a repair stand, a truing stand and spoke tensiometer. I'll get kickback on this, but I don't think you need to go overboard on the repair and truing stand. Rock solid is nice, but often not necessary. You can stand the bike on the floor with a helper to hold it while you jump up and down on a cheater bar attached to the wrench on your bottom bracket, and save $300 on the 45 pound repair stand.
pdlamb is offline  
Old 05-16-24, 07:22 AM
  #19  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 8,173
Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7163 Post(s)
Liked 11,367 Times in 4,858 Posts
Originally Posted by smd4
I've posted this before, and I'm not sure it meets the "budget" requirement, but still think it's a pretty good list of tools that would be useful in most home shops:

I'll preface this by saying you may already have a lot of these tools in your home tool box. Also, lots of these tools might not be necessary for modern bikes. Allen keys, for example, seem to have been replaced by Torx. Anyway...

--Set of metric open/box end wrenches up to 17mm;
--12" adjustable ("Crescent") wrench;
--Ball-peen hammer;
--Metal shop ruler (to measure chain stretch, etc.);
--Needle-nose pliers (to grab the cable when adjusting derailleur cable length);
--JIS (Japanese) Phillips head screwdriver, probably No. 2 will cover you in most instances;
--Hex/Allen Tri-wrench in 4, 5, 6 mm (Without doubt the most useful tool in my toolbox);
--Socket Tri-wrench in 8, 9, 10 mm;
--Torx Tri-wrench (I have one but don't use it, because I don't have any Torx fasteners);
--Pedal Wrench (I have an older (Verma?) model that has both 15mm and 1/2" at either end);
--Set of good quality cone wrenches (I use Park);
--High-quality spoke wrench to fit your spoke nipples. Park makes these. Get the kind that looks like a hot-air-balloon with rubber grip. Don't cheap out on this tool!;
--Headset wrench specific to your headset if you use one. Park makes these as well;
--Chain Whip;
--Cassette lockring tool depending on cassette manufacturer (This will be used in conjunction with your chain whip and adjustable wrench);
--Bottom-bracket tools, depending on what you're using and the era;
--Fourth hand (Hozan makes the best one);
--Quality bike-cable-specific cable cutters (I use a discontinued Shimano version but the newer Park one seems quite capable);
--Metric Allen key set (the "L" shaped ones);
--Chain Tool (type depending on what you use--rivets, quick links, etc.);
--Tools specific to your bike--I need an extra long 6mm Allen key for my stem and an 8mm Allen for my cranks. I also have a specific tool for my chainring bolts and crank dust caps, and one to adjust my pedal bearings;
--Good quality oil (your choice; I use Tri-Flow);
--Good quality grease (your choice; I use Shimano Special Grease. Phil is good too);
--Good quality floor pump including good-quality chuck for your particular valves (I use a Silca Pista Plus with Hiro chuck for Presta valves);
--Tire valve core tool (I think these would be used if you are tubeless and need to remove the valve core);
--Decent floor stand if your bike can be lifted into one;
--Torque wrench if you're dealing with a lot of CF that requires specific torques, or you just don't trust yourself. A beam type should suffice.

Fun tools but completely unnecessary: Angle gauge; digital bike (expensive) or luggage (cheap) scale; digital caliper.

This list is what I can think of off the top of my head, but should be a good start for most home shops. YMMV. There are of course very specialized tools like dropout alignment tools, headset cup and race removers/installers, etc. These can be pricy and not used very often, but many can be fabricated at home. I may add to this list as I think of things.
This is a solid list...And note that some of these items are suitable for general shop use, i.e. not bike-specific, so a person might already own them.

The metric Allen key set is probably the most-used item, so it's smart to go with quality -- say, a Wera set.

For a newbie home mechanic, a couple could be saved for later, such as cone wrenches (not many wheels nowadays with cup and cone bearings) and BB tool.
Koyote is online now  
Likes For Koyote:
Old 05-16-24, 07:56 AM
  #20  
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 14,019

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Phil Wood Apple VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), R+M Supercharger2 Rohloff, Habanero Ti 26

Mentioned: 56 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4523 Post(s)
Liked 4,229 Times in 2,829 Posts
Originally Posted by ScottCommutes
This picture reminded me that in any tool situation, your system of organization is important. I would get a lot more done with a meticulously organized drawer of Harbor Freight sockets than a shoe box full of Snap-on sockets all mixed together. I also wouldn't lose any.
But you don't have to go down significantly in socket quality simply to organize something. You can have quality Snap-On sockets and just organize them it is really not difficult and you can get socket holders quite easily from various manufacturers, in fact there are companies who specialize in tool organization if you don't want to get the Snap-On or BluePoint socket holders or you can get something cheaper to organize them. We had gotten some cheap but effective socket holders at the shop and they work fine for organization and were like $10-$20 a piece

In terms of that tool box it is not a practical set up it is small and compact but for actual usage it would be tougher and slower.
This is a tool box that has stuck in my head for ease of use:
https://www.pinkbike.com/news/interv...ry-racing.html
Granted yes it is a high end professional mechanics tool box they bring to races and for the home mechanic some of those tools might be less needed or could be replaced or just not used. However ease of getting to tools is really the highlight that I am making not it is sexy and dripping with great tools (which it is) However those tools are going to last a long time and not give him any problems when fixing something They might be initially more expensive but long term but pretty cost reasonable in the quality job they do.
veganbikes is offline  
Old 05-16-24, 09:53 AM
  #21  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 6,041

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3662 Post(s)
Liked 3,098 Times in 1,867 Posts
Originally Posted by Koyote
For a newbie home mechanic, a couple could be saved for later, such as cone wrenches (not many wheels nowadays with cup and cone bearings) and BB tool.
Oh, for sure. Mostly these are tools I use, and are decidedly for more-vintage bikes.
smd4 is offline  
Likes For smd4:
Old 05-16-24, 10:00 AM
  #22  
Commuter
 
Smaug1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Location: SE Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 706

Bikes: Main Bikes: 2023 Trek Domane AL3, 2022 Aventon Level.2 eBike, 1972 Schwinn Varsity, 2024 Priority Apollo 11

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 321 Post(s)
Liked 460 Times in 258 Posts
I'm really liking the Topeak Hexus, to carry on the bike. It's a really smart modular design. The sides of it come off and double as tire levers and a hex driver. It's got just about everything on it.
https://www.topeak.com/us/en/product/1066-HEXUS-X

For home use, I like a Craftsman 1/4" drive ratchet and set of metric allen sockets to go with it and a short extension. I don't think the tool kits are really a good deal. Only buy bike-specific tools when it's called for.
Smaug1 is offline  
Old 05-16-24, 10:03 AM
  #23  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2023
Posts: 174
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 114 Post(s)
Liked 72 Times in 44 Posts
The nice thing about tools, even quality ones, is that they'll be, for the most part, cheaper than having the work done even once by a bike shop.
I maintain and fix just about everything and I've never hesitated to buy the appropriate tools. They last a lifetime.
Paul_P is offline  
Likes For Paul_P:
Old 05-16-24, 10:10 AM
  #24  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 6,041

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3662 Post(s)
Liked 3,098 Times in 1,867 Posts
The one pre-made tool kit I bought was the $19.95 Crivet kit from Lidl. A couple of the tools from that kit I still use--the Allen keys, very nice chain whip, and Freehub lockring tool. Most of the other stuff...not so much. But for less than $20 bucks, it was hard to beat.
smd4 is offline  
Old 05-16-24, 10:13 AM
  #25  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 6,041

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3662 Post(s)
Liked 3,098 Times in 1,867 Posts
Originally Posted by Koyote
Here is an interesting article by Dave Rome, who is an actual bike mechanic. He gives his recommendations for a starter tool kit, and it seems pretty sensible.
That's a pretty good article, and mentions things you might not think about, but come in handy: Sharpie, scissors...Lots of tools we probably all have around the house.

And now I think I need a pliers wrench.

Last edited by smd4; 05-16-24 at 10:17 AM.
smd4 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.