Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

TPU Tube experience and Failure mode

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

TPU Tube experience and Failure mode

Old 05-24-24, 11:22 AM
  #51  
Senior Member
 
icemilkcoffee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2,635
Liked 1,976 Times in 1,091 Posts
Originally Posted by chaadster
You should ask a friend or caregiver to explain how a TPU tube described as “impossible to puncture” and which comes with a 1 year warranty against flats, does not mean “very delicate.”
Which TPU tubes is this? The supposed puncture resistance of TPU tubes has been way-oversold. In my experience it is about same as butyl tubes. No better and no worse.
BTW, old ads for tubular tires also claimed that tubulars with latex tubes were 'puncture proof':

https://bulgier.net/pics/bike/Catalo...to-76/p01.html
icemilkcoffee is offline  
Old 05-24-24, 11:42 AM
  #52  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 961
Liked 1,107 Times in 465 Posts
TPU tubes shine best on a carbon wheel with at least 21mm internal width (less likely to get pinched in the rim). If there are spoke holes it needs to be taped up like a tubeless setup preferably double wrapped if using narrow high pressure tires. Overall I prefer them and I just buy them in batches. I find the best combination is using a tire that has some degree of puncture resistance. I usually just buy them at $3-4 a pair and have a whole drawer full of them. Also use an electric e-pump to air them up. I can easily carry 2 tpu tubes with barely any weight penalty.
jonathanf2 is offline  
Old 05-24-24, 11:49 AM
  #53  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 6,204

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Liked 3,188 Times in 1,925 Posts
Being plastic...I wonder if any TPU punctures could simply be "melted" closed with a soldering iron or something similar?
smd4 is offline  
Old 05-24-24, 12:11 PM
  #54  
Thread Killer
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 12,746

Bikes: 15 Kinesis Racelight 4S, 76 Motebecane Gran Jubilée, 17 Dedacciai Gladiatore2, 12 Breezer Venturi, 09 Dahon Mariner, 12 Mercier Nano, 95 DeKerf Team SL, 19 Tern Rally, 21 Breezer Doppler Cafe+, 19 T-Lab X3, 91 Serotta CII, 23 3T Strada

Liked 1,896 Times in 1,139 Posts
Originally Posted by icemilkcoffee
Which TPU tubes is this? The supposed puncture resistance of TPU tubes has been way-oversold. In my experience it is about same as butyl tubes. No better and no worse.
BTW, old ads for tubular tires also claimed that tubulars with latex tubes were 'puncture proof':

https://bulgier.net/pics/bike/Catalo...to-76/p01.html
Tubolito X Tubo City/Tour is the impossible to puncture TPU with a 1 year warranty on all flats.

WIth regard to your assessment that TPU’s puncture resistance is oversold, I think it’s more the case that TPU’s puncture resistance is misunderstood, as there is virtually no practical way for anyone to assess how many saves (i.e. might have been flats) a TPU provides compared to butyl. We just can’t run both tires in identical situations, so the only insight people have is when they get flats. And it’s just flats; no one is logging road debris conditions when they flat, so it’s just a random-assed inflection point that doesn’t say anything at all about relative puncture resistance between material types. What happens, then, in the absence of any other info, whether a tube flats becomes the measure for puncture resistance.

Color me crazy, but I still understand latex to be more puncture reistant than butyl, so I don’t see anything shocking or amiss in the Clement ad: I’m sure their latex tubulars were more puncture resistant than butyl at the time.

Which brings up another point: the tire is the frontline defense against punctures, and it must be understood that anything able to puncture a tire tread can certainly puncture any tube if the intrusion goes in far enough. Again, we have no practical way of knowing how many tread punctures don’t result in flats, so anyone who claims to have “experience” showing that TPU doesn’t perform better than butyl or latex against punctures is just a charlatan. Outside of the tire, every needle type puncture test shows clear advantage to TPU, so there’s at least some rational basis to expect TPU to deliver some in-tire advantage, too.
chaadster is online now  
Likes For chaadster:
Old 05-24-24, 12:29 PM
  #55  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
squirtdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Jose (Willow Glen) Ca
Posts: 10,100

Bikes: Kirk Custom JK Special, '84 Team Miyata,(dura ace old school) 80?? SR Semi-Pro 600 Arabesque

Liked 3,114 Times in 1,675 Posts
Originally Posted by chaadster
I’m sorry…based on what? You made no attempt to field repair the tube.

Had that been a butyl tube you’d snake-bit with that much force, you’d have a much more damaged tube with probably four, long, field irreparable cuts. Would you say then that butyl is not field patchable?

Seriously, please think about this, and the entire situation, before you respond, because I’m sure you’ll realize the fundamental problem if you do.
let me preface my response with noting I am conservative after decades of commuting and having flats in rain, wind, dark and other not optimum conditions

I try to plan to not have to patch any tube in the wild.
This means carrying 2 spare tubes. I also carry patch kit, levers multitool, valve tool, c02 and a pump, and various other crap likes gloves and wipes. If there is any chance of being in the dark I carry a small headlamp....been a lifesaver.
I have had a couple of cases over the ages where I did need to use both spare tubes and then needed to patch also...
Fwiw for tubies I carry sealant and a spare tire and if I am going long distance two spares

Minimalist i am not

back to subject

My experience trying to find the leaks in the tube are what lead me to maintain field repair of TPU will be difficult at best and probably not possible in bad conditions (dark, windy etc) bit of refinement of wording granted
Specific issues I found/experienced
  • TPU tubes are so light that is hard handle them and look for a leak and maintain position once you find a leak. Doing this in wind would be a zoo
  • I had do the dunk the tube in a filled sink to find the leaks.....I have not had had to do this with butyl tubes in forever, typically not practical in the wild depending on where you are
  • Punctures were hard to see even when found
This is my experience, granted limited, and opinion. Not right or wrong per se, but my thinking based on what I have seen so far

I am sharing information as I see it and the logic behind it, people can use it as the see it. I really don't have an axe to grind

I am not the only person who has noted some of these issues...again every one has different experiences (like some people run a specific tire for huge miles not flats and other run same tire have lots of flats)

I am not quite sure, what gets you animated about this subject

enjoy the ride, butly, tpu, tubeless, tubie
__________________
Life is too short not to ride the best bike you have, as much as you can.





squirtdad is offline  
Likes For squirtdad:
Old 05-24-24, 04:10 PM
  #56  
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 27,584

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Liked 4,419 Times in 2,465 Posts
Originally Posted by chaadster
Tubolito X Tubo City/Tour is the impossible to puncture TPU with a 1 year warranty on all flats.
”Impossible” is a very, very high standard. Even with a 1 year warranty, I’d question if they are “impossible” to puncture in all situations. In the land of soft, fuzzy things like Ann Arbor, MI, the tubes are mostly impervious. Come to the southwest and that “impossible” standard is going to be severely tested. I’ve seen people with tubeless that have flatted here in parts of Colorado. Slime (and other sealants) in tubes are questionable when it comes to going up against goatheads.

WIth regard to your assessment that TPU’s puncture resistance is oversold, I think it’s more the case that TPU’s puncture resistance is misunderstood, as there is virtually no practical way for anyone to assess how many saves (i.e. might have been flats) a TPU provides compared to butyl. We just can’t run both tires in identical situations, so the only insight people have is when they get flats. And it’s just flats; no one is logging road debris conditions when they flat, so it’s just a random-assed inflection point that doesn’t say anything at all about relative puncture resistance between material types. What happens, then, in the absence of any other info, whether a tube flats becomes the measure for puncture resistance.
Perhaps people misunderstand TPU’s puncture resistance but that doesn’t mean that it isn’t oversold. That was my experience upon installation. The tubes were properly installed. The TPU tubes replaced butyl tubes that were showing zero signs of any kind of puncture. The punctures that occurred with the TPU after installation were due to very small debris in the tire that I later found after two punctures. Both were in the same place and upon very, very, very careful inspection were found but they didn’t cause problems with butyl’s thicker wall.

The patches provided by RideNow were also a major failing of their particular brand. Perhaps other stick-on patches would work but how many different products do you expect me to try? I did eventually get a Tubolito patch kit and it does work well enough. However the 30 minute cure time of the adhesive makes the patch kit something that can used in the field. Yes, I carry extra tubes but here in the land of pokey things, it’s very easy to puncture much more than one…or twice…or 10 times.

​​​​​​​Color me crazy, but I still understand latex to be more puncture reistant than butyl, so I don’t see anything shocking or amiss in the Clement ad: I’m sure their latex tubulars were more puncture resistant than butyl at the time.
Different discussion but latex don’t seem to have any better puncture resistance here or further south where there are many more sharp, pokey things than in Ann Arbor.

​​​​​​​Which brings up another point: the tire is the frontline defense against punctures, and it must be understood that anything able to puncture a tire tread can certainly puncture any tube if the intrusion goes in far enough. Again, we have no practical way of knowing how many tread punctures don’t result in flats, so anyone who claims to have “experience” showing that TPU doesn’t perform better than butyl or latex against punctures is just a charlatan. Outside of the tire, every needle type puncture test shows clear advantage to TPU, so there’s at least some rational basis to expect TPU to deliver some in-tire advantage, too.
Yes, the tire is the frontline defense but it is a piss poor one. Although I don’t run tubeless, there is no bicycle tire product that is impervious to the kinds of sharp object you’ll find here in the southwest. There are some that work a little better…Mr Tuffys are better than “thorn proof” in my experience and sealants from tubeless are better than Slime…but nothing is going to work 100% in all locations.

Frankly, I don’t see how thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) can be more puncture resistant. The material isn’t particularly stretchy nor does it do well with deformation. Instructions on chasing down leaks warn to not over inflate the tube outside of a tire to avoid deformation of the tube. The material isn’t elastic.
__________________
Stuart Black
Plan Epsilon Around Lake Michigan in the era of Covid
Old School…When It Wasn’t Ancient bikepacking
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!



cyccommute is offline  
Likes For cyccommute:
Old 05-24-24, 04:40 PM
  #57  
Senior Member
 
jadmt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2022
Location: Missoula MT
Posts: 1,816

Bikes: Handsome xoxo, Serotta atx, Canyon Endurace CF8

Liked 2,014 Times in 883 Posts
got a new GP5000 and installed it using a tpu that has about 3000 miles on it. no tools were used just some baby powder (Schwalbe said not necessary with the Aerothans but won't hurt anything). and the last little bit of the bead I used a little soapy water to get the last few inches on. I had about 6 beers before starting and it still only took about 10 minutes at the most.....no worries about pinches as I can see the entire tube is inside the tire. I blow the tube up by mouth so no worry about over inflating as I again I am old drunk....




jadmt is offline  
Old 05-24-24, 04:53 PM
  #58  
climber has-been
 
terrymorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 7,416

Bikes: Scott Addict R1, Felt Z1

Liked 3,941 Times in 1,945 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute
Frankly, I don’t see how thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) can be more puncture resistant. The material isn’t particularly stretchy nor does it do well with deformation. Instructions on chasing down leaks warn to not over inflate the tube outside of a tire to avoid deformation of the tube. The material isn’t elastic.
A little clarification: TPU is somewhat elastic, but not nearly as elastic as latex or butyl rubber.

TPU elongation at yield (permanent deformation) can go as high as 35%. Butyl rubber elongation at break (doesn't really yield) is 400-800%.

A huge difference.
__________________
Ride, Rest, Repeat. ROUVY: terrymorse


terrymorse is offline  
Likes For terrymorse:
Old 05-24-24, 05:08 PM
  #59  
Senior Member
 
zandoval's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bastrop Texas
Posts: 4,641

Bikes: Univega, Peu P6, Peu PR-10, Ted Williams, Peu UO-8, Peu UO-18 Mixte, Peu Dolomites

Liked 1,740 Times in 1,117 Posts
Originally Posted by squirtdad
...So for me personally, I am going back to my conti race lite tubes, carry 2 and a rema tip top patch kit. Which is not to say that I might not try TPU again in the future...
The only reason I have not tried out TPU is the initial cost. I am not too excited at having to use sealant in my TPU tubes. I wonder if the specs on TPU tubes will be a marketing ploy. Thicker TPU for example. Still, around here, back in the woods, I dont see anyone using TPU. I am seeing a few more Tubeless though.

Still doing the wait and see... Thanks for posting...
__________________
No matter where you're at... There you are... Δf:=f(1/2)-f(-1/2)
zandoval is offline  
Likes For zandoval:
Old 05-24-24, 05:47 PM
  #60  
Senior Member
 
icemilkcoffee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2,635
Liked 1,976 Times in 1,091 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute
The patches provided by RideNow were also a major failing of their particular brand. Perhaps other stick-on patches would work but how many different products do you expect me to try?
I can confirm the RideNow self-adhesive stick-on patches are complete garbage. 100% failure rate. I also had Pirelli stick-on patches and one patch stayed on permanently. Another two patches lost air overnight- but stayed on well enough to 'get me home'.
When it comes to TPU patching, it's still very much trial and error- I don't think the industry, or us, have nailed down a BKM yet. I certainly haven't. I have 2-3 tubes that need re-patching as we speak. The glue-on patches are very iffy and temperamental.
icemilkcoffee is offline  
Old 05-24-24, 05:53 PM
  #61  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 961
Liked 1,107 Times in 465 Posts
Originally Posted by icemilkcoffee
I can confirm the RideNow self-adhesive stick-on patches are complete garbage. 100% failure rate. I also had Pirelli stick-on patches and one patch stayed on permanently. Another two patches lost air overnight- but stayed on well enough to 'get me home'.
When it comes to TPU patching, it's still very much trial and error- I don't think the industry, or us, have nailed down a BKM yet. I certainly haven't. I have 2-3 tubes that need re-patching as we speak. The glue-on patches are very iffy and temperamental.
Park Tools makes good glueless patches with strong adhesive. The other day I helped another cyclist with a flat patch his butyl tube and it took all but 10 minutes. I'd use a heat gun or blow dryer to really seal the patches for tubes that need fixing.
jonathanf2 is offline  
Old 05-24-24, 07:26 PM
  #62  
Thread Killer
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 12,746

Bikes: 15 Kinesis Racelight 4S, 76 Motebecane Gran Jubilée, 17 Dedacciai Gladiatore2, 12 Breezer Venturi, 09 Dahon Mariner, 12 Mercier Nano, 95 DeKerf Team SL, 19 Tern Rally, 21 Breezer Doppler Cafe+, 19 T-Lab X3, 91 Serotta CII, 23 3T Strada

Liked 1,896 Times in 1,139 Posts
It must be the water, though self-reported cases of mental *********** are predictably low…

EDIT: handicapation?
chaadster is online now  
Old 05-24-24, 07:53 PM
  #63  
Grupetto Bob
 
rsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Seattle-ish
Posts: 6,683

Bikes: Bikey McBike Face

Liked 6,235 Times in 3,178 Posts
I have been successfully running these for months - but then they are in GP5Ks which are pretty puncture resistant. And at these prices, when I get a hole that can’t be patched it’s no big deal. Edit: and best of all, they’re bondage free.

__________________
Road 🚴🏾‍♂️ & Mountain 🚵🏾‍♂️







rsbob is offline  
Likes For rsbob:
Old 05-24-24, 11:43 PM
  #64  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
squirtdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Jose (Willow Glen) Ca
Posts: 10,100

Bikes: Kirk Custom JK Special, '84 Team Miyata,(dura ace old school) 80?? SR Semi-Pro 600 Arabesque

Liked 3,114 Times in 1,675 Posts
Originally Posted by jadmt
got a new GP5000 and installed it using a tpu that has about 3000 miles on it. no tools were used just some baby powder (Schwalbe said not necessary with the Aerothans but won't hurt anything). and the last little bit of the bead I used a little soapy water to get the last few inches on. I had about 6 beers before starting and it still only took about 10 minutes at the most.....no worries about pinches as I can see the entire tube is inside the tire. I blow the tube up by mouth so no worry about over inflating as I again I am old drunk....




Got it, secret is the 6 beers prior to installing
__________________
Life is too short not to ride the best bike you have, as much as you can.





squirtdad is offline  
Old 05-25-24, 06:46 AM
  #65  
Senior Member
 
jadmt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2022
Location: Missoula MT
Posts: 1,816

Bikes: Handsome xoxo, Serotta atx, Canyon Endurace CF8

Liked 2,014 Times in 883 Posts
Originally Posted by squirtdad
Got it, secret is the 6 beers prior to installing
that seems like the magic number of beers depending on how difficult the task....I should have noted that being the tube and tire were both made in Germany a German style hefi was consumed so fairly low abv....
jadmt is offline  
Likes For jadmt:
Old 05-25-24, 07:30 AM
  #66  
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 27,584

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Liked 4,419 Times in 2,465 Posts
Originally Posted by icemilkcoffee
I can confirm the RideNow self-adhesive stick-on patches are complete garbage. 100% failure rate. I also had Pirelli stick-on patches and one patch stayed on permanently. Another two patches lost air overnight- but stayed on well enough to 'get me home'.
When it comes to TPU patching, it's still very much trial and error- I don't think the industry, or us, have nailed down a BKM yet. I certainly haven't. I have 2-3 tubes that need re-patching as we speak. The glue-on patches are very iffy and temperamental.
Which is part of my problem with TPU. I don’t mind experiments but I’d rather not have a 10 mile walk home when I do experiments.

Originally Posted by terrymorse
A little clarification: TPU is somewhat elastic, but not nearly as elastic as latex or butyl rubber.

TPU elongation at yield (permanent deformation) can go as high as 35%. Butyl rubber elongation at break (doesn't really yield) is 400-800%.

A huge difference.
“Somewhat” is doing a lot of heavy lifting there. If the material permanently deforms, that’s not elastic. Elasticity is a 2 part process…expansion and contraction. Rubber goes back to the same shape and size after being stretched. TPU doesn’t. There is the warning in the RideNow package about filling the tube outside of a tire because that can result in permanent deformation. That’s also what makes finding flats such a problem because the TPU tube really can’t be overpressured like rubber can be. Instead of streams of bubbles, the bubbles formed are very tiny.

In fact, the elasticity of TPU tubes is low enough that the size of the TPU tube needs to be carefully matched to tire size. I have direct experience with ruining a 25mm TPU tube in a 37mm tire. The tube expanded on the inner edge of the torus towards the spoke holes and burst.
__________________
Stuart Black
Plan Epsilon Around Lake Michigan in the era of Covid
Old School…When It Wasn’t Ancient bikepacking
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!



cyccommute is offline  
Likes For cyccommute:
Old 05-25-24, 10:21 AM
  #67  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,590
Likes: 0
Liked 443 Times in 306 Posts
[QUOTE][chaadster Posted: It must be the water, though self-reported cases of mental *********** are predictably low…

EDIT: handicapation?/QUOTE]

Rick is offline  
Old 05-25-24, 10:56 AM
  #68  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 6,204

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Liked 3,188 Times in 1,925 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute
Rubber goes back to the same shape and size after being stretched.
No it doesn’t. Glass is more elastic than rubber.
smd4 is offline  
Old 05-25-24, 12:43 PM
  #69  
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 15,863

Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2017 Workswell 093, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE

Liked 3,843 Times in 2,012 Posts
Originally Posted by smd4
Glass is more elastic than rubber.
I am already stocking up on glass inner tubes.
Maelochs is offline  
Likes For Maelochs:
Old 05-25-24, 01:13 PM
  #70  
climber has-been
 
terrymorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 7,416

Bikes: Scott Addict R1, Felt Z1

Liked 3,941 Times in 1,945 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute
Rubber goes back to the same shape and size after being stretched.
Originally Posted by smd4
No it doesn’t. Glass is more elastic than rubber.
Please clarify, because rubber does indeed return to its original length when the tension is removed (as long as it doesn't break, of course).

"Glass is more elastic than rubber" is technically true (elastic modulus = stress/strain), but completely irrelevant.
__________________
Ride, Rest, Repeat. ROUVY: terrymorse



Last edited by terrymorse; 05-25-24 at 01:47 PM.
terrymorse is offline  
Old 05-25-24, 01:46 PM
  #71  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 6,204

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Liked 3,188 Times in 1,925 Posts
Originally Posted by terrymorse
Please explain.
Elasticity: the ability of an object or material to resume its normal shape after being stretched or compressed.

Rubber, when stretched, deforms very slightly; it does not return exactly to its original shape or form. Think used rubber bands. Or some of your nasty old underwear.

Take a two-foot long strip of glass, clamp it vertically in a vise, and pull the top edge, bending the strip. Then release. The glass will return exactly to its original position. It is therefore, by definition, more elastic than rubber.

Which is more elastic rubber or glass
smd4 is offline  
Old 05-25-24, 01:56 PM
  #72  
climber has-been
 
terrymorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 7,416

Bikes: Scott Addict R1, Felt Z1

Liked 3,941 Times in 1,945 Posts
Originally Posted by smd4
Rubber, when stretched, deforms very slightly; it does not return exactly to its original shape or form. Think used rubber bands. Or some of your nasty old underwear.
Nonsense. Stretch and release a rubber band, and it will return to its original length.

Rubber does not lose its elasticity (primarily) from being stressed, but from oxidation, reaction with ozone, and UV radiation.
__________________
Ride, Rest, Repeat. ROUVY: terrymorse



Last edited by terrymorse; 05-25-24 at 03:53 PM.
terrymorse is offline  
Likes For terrymorse:
Old 05-25-24, 01:59 PM
  #73  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 6,204

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Liked 3,188 Times in 1,925 Posts
Originally Posted by terrymorse
Nonsense. Stretch and release a rubber band, and it will return to its original length.

Rubber does not lose its elasticity from being stressed, but from oxidation, reaction with ozone, and UV radiation.
You can call it nonsense if you wish. Surprised your HS physics teacher never stumped you with this one.

Or actually, maybe he did.

Last edited by smd4; 05-25-24 at 02:03 PM.
smd4 is offline  
Old 05-25-24, 02:14 PM
  #74  
climber has-been
 
terrymorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 7,416

Bikes: Scott Addict R1, Felt Z1

Liked 3,941 Times in 1,945 Posts
Originally Posted by smd4
You can call it nonsense if you wish. Surprised your HS physics teacher never stumped you with this one.
Got any references to support this claim that deformed rubber does not return to its original shape when the stress is removed?

Because that goes against everything I learned about elastic deformation.

Okay, some searching has brought up the concept of "stress-induced softening", where elastomers can soften (up to maybe 15%) under certain conditions of deformation. So there's a kernel of truth. Still irrelevant to inner tubes.
__________________
Ride, Rest, Repeat. ROUVY: terrymorse



Last edited by terrymorse; 05-25-24 at 02:35 PM.
terrymorse is offline  
Old 05-25-24, 02:15 PM
  #75  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 6,204

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Liked 3,188 Times in 1,925 Posts
Originally Posted by terrymorse
Got any references to support this claim that deformed rubber does not return to its original shape when the stress is removed?
Do I have to explain Google to you too?
smd4 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.