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Help me decide n+1 bike

Old 05-22-24, 11:57 AM
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Help me decide n+1 bike

I already have a nice 2021 Trek FX sport Carbon bike, and I am debating getting a second bike, that is a little more worry free than carbon, and still a sport hybrid somewhat.

1. I am debating if i should get a single speed or not?
2. should I get a aluminum or Steele?

Please explain your reasoning.
I do utilize the gears to maintain optimal cadence, and can't decide between aluminum or Steele, what is your experience amongst the two?

I ride mostly residential
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Old 05-22-24, 12:01 PM
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What do you want to do with this bike? Or better yet, what do you want this bike to do for you that your current bike will not? N+1 is fine, but at least come up with a plausible reason for it.😅
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Old 05-22-24, 12:03 PM
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Ride what you have and don't worry about the carbon. No need for another bike unless it's an upgrade or a completely different type of bike. JMO
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Old 05-22-24, 12:13 PM
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I want to be able to look it up outside, commuting, and casual rides, and running quick errands and a in general different experience than what i have now.
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Old 05-22-24, 12:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Awesomeguy
I want to be able to look it up outside, commuting, and casual rides, and running quick errands and a in general different experience than what i have now.
Get an aluminum frame and CF fork for a bike you don't want to worry about. I own a mix of bikes and frame materials, and while I don't worry about CF breaking, I don't **** to leave an expensive bike outside a store while I shop, and for commuting, I like racks, which a lot of CF frames don't support.

You need to ask yourself how secure your lock-ups will be. If you are really afraid of theft, get a super-cheap piece of crap .... or buy a bunch of $50-$100 used bikes, and you won't worry about theft so much.

If you are more worried about people hitting your bike with shopping carts or something, then get an aluminum bike, and some touch-up paint,. I used to wrap my commuter bike in split inner tubes because the paint on the top tube got torn up when I locked it against a post or something and people moved it slightly while passing.

If you can tolerate a little scratching and wear, and aren't too worried about theft, then get a decent Al frame/CF fork version of what you have now. Hopefully it will still ride well but also give you a little peace of mind.
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Old 05-22-24, 12:36 PM
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Get a cargo oriented cruiser bike. The cruisers with very slack seat tube angles (< 70°) will let you sit upright very comfortably and pedal at a leisurely pace. If the STA is slack enough, you'll be able to stop and put your feet down on the ground without getting off the saddle.

They are sort of hard to find though here in the USA. Sometimes they show up on the dealer websites and in shops. And other times they don't. They come with both IGH and typical derailleur equipped. But for leisurely tooling around, I'd definitely go with the IGH.

Trek has the Electra line. But currently they aren't showing the ones that were more cargo oriented with racks on them as they were a few years ago. Other brands will have them too online. Just look on their site for city bike or terms other than road bike or fitness bike.
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Old 05-22-24, 01:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Awesomeguy
I want to be able to look it up outside, commuting, and casual rides, and running quick errands and a in general different experience than what i have now.
are you mechanically inclined? you could get a used 80's bike and convert it to a townie for minimal cost

1) used bike
2) Velo orange left bank bars https://velo-orange.com/collections/...ndlebar-config
3) tektro levers https://velo-orange.com/collections/...-22-2-dia-bars
4) and if you want to move shifters Thumbies https://velo-orange.com/collections/...thumb-shifters


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Old 05-22-24, 01:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Awesomeguy
I want to be able to look it up outside, commuting, and casual rides, and running quick errands and a in general different experience than what i have now.
If there is a reasonable chance of having it stolen, I would get the cheapest used bike that fit me and the environment. I do my own basic and mid-level maintenance though and have lots of spare parts where I can fix up a used bike very inexpensively. I would prefer no carbon at all myself because I wouldn't have to worry about dings and scratches, and I would buy something with enough tire suspension that a rigid steel or aluminum frame wouldn't be uncomfortable.
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Old 05-22-24, 04:53 PM
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Titanium is my vote. However I would probably want a bike that was significantly different from what I have. If I am buying it as a beater bike I would build another New Albion Privateer with parts that are way nicer than they should be but were in the parts bin and still be a little nervous when locking it up but simply because I love the bike so much not because of real investment because it does have XTR and XT and a carbon fork and Surly Moloko bars and such most of it was free or under $40. It is a pretty cheap frame but well made and decent steel and it is comfortable and just perfect how I have it set up. I keep wanting to replace the bike with something and inevitably I build almost the same thing with slightly better parts (or more modern) and disc brakes but then I say but I love that bike so much what would I do with it and the debate ends in my head.
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Old 05-22-24, 05:30 PM
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consider a vintage mtb - early / mid 90’s - preferably one with original rigid fork

change the tires
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Old 05-22-24, 08:27 PM
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If you want “what I have now, just a less flashy, lower spec,” then a secondhand Cannondale Quick or Trek Verve would be a suitable grocery-getter, saving the “good” bike for dedicated sporting rides.

A dedicated rack & baskets shopping bike is a nice thing to have if you run errands on the regular; having it sitting there all ready to go means you’ll be more likely to take it than if you have to faff about putting the bags on one of the fast bikes every time.


A single speed is nice to have as an option, but it does require a different approach to the ride; depending on the gears it’s got and the ride route, be prepared to be a lot slower, or work a lot harder. Probably both. Double that if it’s a fixie, cause you can’t stop pedaling
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Old 05-22-24, 10:25 PM
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Not single speed, except for beach cruisers.

3 or 6 speed IGH with belt? Much less maintenance! Non-descript frame if theft is being considered. Aluminum or steel does not matter. Keep it stored dry. Chain drivelines with derailleurs work best when lubed and cleaned regularly.

for groceries, running errands, commuting and having more energy for life's duties = e-bikes are affordable, practical transport. And can be sporty, too.

I keep a bunch of bikes handy - there are a dozen good reasons for n+1. just do it. Buyers market as well - in both new and used.
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Old 05-23-24, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Iride01
.

Trek has the Electra line. But currently they aren't showing the ones that were more cargo oriented with racks on them as they were a few years ago. Other brands will have them too online. Just look on their site for city bike or terms other than road bike or fitness bike.
I like this idea. I got my wife an Electra Townie GO! 7D last year; a cruiser eBike. It didn’t INCLUDE the rack and fenders, but we bought the OEM rack separately; it’s quite stout. She doesn’t need fenders, as she’s strictly a fair weather rider. She’s got a nice basket on it to carry her purse and jacket.
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Old 05-23-24, 10:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Awesomeguy
I already have a nice 2021 Trek FX sport Carbon bike, and I am debating getting a second bike, that is a little more worry free than carbon, and still a sport hybrid somewhat.

1. I am debating if i should get a single speed or not?
2. should I get a aluminum or Steele?

Please explain your reasoning.
I do utilize the gears to maintain optimal cadence, and can't decide between aluminum or Steele, what is your experience amongst the two?

I ride mostly residential
If the main reason is to worry less about the bike, I would skip it and stop worrying. Enjoy the bike, it's already 3 years old. Trek is a leader in carbon frames now. Unless you really slam it around at bike racks or something.

If you want something different that would compliment the Trek, what would you look to do with it? Would you commute or run local errands? Maybe go a bit faster, so look at something with drop bars to narrow and lower your aero profile and put more weight over your legs?
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Old 05-23-24, 10:23 AM
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One kind of do-it-all option would be to add an electric cargo or commuter-type bike. You would work only has hard as you want to. If you use it for transportation in the summer, you would have the option to not arrive sweaty. Likewise for work, you could take it easy on the way into work and work hard and get sweaty on the way home.

If that sounds good, I have some possibilities in mind that you could consider.

Also, what's your budget?
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Old 05-23-24, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Smaug1
If the main reason is to worry less about the bike, I would skip it and stop worrying. Enjoy the bike, it's already 3 years old. Trek is a leader in carbon frames now. Unless you really slam it around at bike racks or something.

If you want something different that would compliment the Trek, what would you look to do with it? Would you commute or run local errands? Maybe go a bit faster, so look at something with drop bars to narrow and lower your aero profile and put more weight over your legs?
hmm interesting you say the thing about more weight on the legs with drop bars... HOw does that work.. usually, drop bars have more weigh on the hands, but not familiar with more weight on the legs
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Old 05-23-24, 12:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Awesomeguy
I want to be able to look it up outside, commuting, and casual rides, and running quick errands and a in general different experience than what i have now.
This is a Little clearer but not clear.
Originally Posted by Smaug1
If the main reason is to worry less about the bike, I would skip it and stop worrying. Enjoy the bike, it's already 3 years old. Trek is a leader in carbon frames now. Unless you really slam it around at bike racks or something.

If you want something different that would compliment the Trek, what would you look to do with it? Would you commute or run local errands? Maybe go a bit faster, so look at something with drop bars to narrow and lower your aero profile and put more weight over your legs?
OP needs to narrow down precisely what the new bike is supposed to do, before anyone can give better advice.

If theft is the issue, buy old beater bikes and fix them up just enough to get to the store or job and back. I did this fir a long time, and enjoyed it. You still have to buy tires, tubes, cables, tape, and often chains, but if you collect a lot of trash or junk bikes, strip them, and put them back in the trash you can keep a fleet going pretty cheap

Depends on the market where you are, and on what people throw out. In urban/suburban areas, people clean out garages, or move to new rental properties, or upgrade houses, and toss all the old stuff. Also, parents buy new bikes for the kids and junk the old stuff. Also usually a lot fo used bikes for sale (same sources and processes.) Where I live now it might be harder (not enough population density, perhaps.)

If you just want a cheaper alternative you don't have to worry about scratching ..... either buy metal or wrap the tubes with old tires and just stop worrying. it is a bike, a transport tool, and it works just as well if it looks brand new or a little used. As @Smaug1 said, just stop worrying. Enjoy your bike.

Until OP clarifies or chooses one or more of the excellent options already offered ......
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Old 05-23-24, 10:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Awesomeguy
hmm interesting you say the thing about more weight on the legs with drop bars... HOw does that work.. usually, drop bars have more weigh on the hands, but not familiar with more weight on the legs
assuming the drop bars are further forward and/or lower than the flat bar, (and they usually are) there is more of the riders weight over the legs which translates to “free power”.
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Old 05-24-24, 03:14 PM
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All I can say is I love my CAAD 12.

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