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Who is sick of tubeless maintenance?

Old 06-20-24, 02:17 PM
  #126  
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Originally Posted by base2
Another hack is on known loose fitting rims with known loose fitting tires is to build up the central valley of the rim with bog standard 10mm Velox (except for the area around the valve hole of course) Then apply 2 layers of tubeless tape as per usual. This lessens the open area for air loss upon initial inflation.

It goes with out saying that pulling the valve core prior to any initial inflation efforts really help to stack the deck towards success.

If the combination above doesn't work, then setting the beads with a tube, popping one bead, and pulling the tube will further reduce air loss area.

If that still doesn't work, take the loose bead and try to manually pull it up to the bead shelf as much as is practical before the attempt to set the bead.

I've never had one that couldn't be set.
Part of my issue is that my Air Shot cannister threads on to the valve core, not the valve stem (poor design I was ignorant to when I bought it). The core has to be in place for it to work. I suppose I could chop off the thread-on chuck and install a different one. I think I'll just get a compressor setup.
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Old 06-20-24, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Koyote
Don't forget spraying soapy water (from a spray bottle) along the beads. I just keep a bottle of the stuff on my workbench.
Same.
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Old 06-20-24, 05:51 PM
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I will say if I ever go to tubeless (not a knock on tubeless) I will be way better prepared with some of this info
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Old 06-20-24, 07:08 PM
  #129  
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv
Serious question. Has anyone experienced a tubeless tire becoming unseated due to a puncture on the road? I can't recall ever having this happen with a tubed tire and it seems it might be less likely with tubeless for a couple of reasons. I've been able to seat my tubeless tires at home w/o a compressor or booster but I don't carry a floor pump on the bike, only CO2, a mini and puncture strips. Wondering if I should carry a tube.
I did, last summer IIRC. Crossing the Longview bridge over the Columbia river, I hit something on the downhill side that caused the tire to spew but wouldn't seal. By the time I got off the bridge, it was nearly flat. I plugged it and tried inflating, but it wouldn't seat. Eventually I tubed it and all was well the rest of the ride. I would not count on the ability to seat a tire roadside.

I've used a tube, off the top of my head, four times in the last 5ish years since going with tubeless. Once for a large sidewall cut on the Oregon coast outside Astoria - booted, tubed, and gingerly rode the ten miles or so to a bike shop in town. Once for a sidewall cut in Seattle - a package of box cutter blades was strewn across the road, and I hit one - booted and tubed. Once just a few miles from home, when I pulled a seldom-ridden bike down and didn't check the sealant. Tubed and inflated. Then the occasion mentioned above.

Of course you have to counter my experiences with the folks who've ridden ten years tubeless with nary an issue.

I'm not going back to tubes, but not because it's all puppy dogs and kitties. It's because every tubeless roadside repair would have been a tubed roadside repair, and many non-events while tubeless would have been roadside repairs while tubed. And that, to me, makes all the pains in the butt of tubeless worthwhile.
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Old 06-20-24, 07:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Koyote
The beauty of tubeless is that you can get puncture protection without using tires that combine the weight of a boat anchor with the ride quality of a garden hose.​​​​​​
You are always coming down hard on those you say throw shade on tubeless without trying them. Have you ever tried reinforced clinchers? I don't know if M+ come in 700C x 25mm, but Bontrager HardCase do, and they GLIDE! I am 65y.o. with nothing to prove. I don't need better than the GLIDE I get off the Bonties. I've reeled in whippersnappers 1/3 my age once or twice. On the clinchers! What do you do when ALL your bike will take is 25mm and that is pushing it because it really should have 23mm?? Buy a new bike? Seriously? Run the 25's with 65psi? I don't think so. This thread has done nothing to change my position. I need to see if I can get an html editor to boldface my sig ...
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Old 06-20-24, 07:17 PM
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^^^I think you can still get GP5000 in 25mm. Or maybe a 650b conversion.
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Old 06-20-24, 07:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm
Have you ever tried reinforced clinchers?
Yes, I have.

I only opine on things I've actually tried; how about you?
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Old 06-20-24, 09:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm
What do you do when ALL your bike will take is 25mm and that is pushing it because it really should have 23mm?? Buy a new bike? Seriously? Run the 25's with 65psi? I don't think so. This thread has done nothing to change my position. I need to see if I can get an html editor to boldface my sig ...
I’ve been riding 23mm and 25mm tubeless for 11 years at my >220lbs weight, so I’d answer your question by saying to run tubeless if you want to. 25mm tire max is not much of limiting factor, except for comparatively limited selection, but there are many quality options in 25mm, from top, world class performance tires like Michelin Power Cup and Schwalbe Pro One, to more robust offerings like Panaracer Agilist Duro and Kenda Valkyrie. I’d probably recommend for you, based on what wrote above, the IRC Formula Pro RBCC, because it is a true tubeless design which will make setup easier and offer greater durability.
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Old 06-20-24, 10:58 PM
  #134  
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm
What do you do when ALL your bike will take is 25mm and that is pushing it because it really should have 23mm?? Buy a new bike? Seriously? Run the 25's with 65psi? I don't think so.
I have one of those bikes…okay, I can squeeze 26s on it. My choice is to run 26 tubeless (Vittoria Corsa Pro). For me, 80psi rear/75psi front is WAY better than 100+psi tubed clinchers. I actually run a slightly lower pressure than recommended by the Silca Pressure Calculator.
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Old 06-20-24, 11:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm
This thread has done nothing to change my position.
Of course not. People sure of the superiority of their position tend to find ways to justify it, including exaggeration and nonsensical assumptions.
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Old 06-20-24, 11:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Eric F
Of course not. People sure of the superiority of their position tend to find ways to justify it, including exaggeration and nonsensical assumptions.
What assumptions? Here we have it right out in full view of the women and children. Soap, Sealant, Tape, Air Compressors, St. Andrew's Crosses, egads. I am not worthy. Nothing superior from this quarter. I acknowledge my deficiencies in not being able to give up the tube.
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Old 06-21-24, 12:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm
What assumptions? Here we have it right out in full view of the women and children. Soap, Sealant, Tape, Air Compressors, St. Andrew's Crosses, egads. I am not worthy. Nothing superior from this quarter. I acknowledge my deficiencies in not being able to give up the tube.
25s @ 65psi is an assumption/exaggeration in a weak attempt to validate your position. Easy research provides facts about recommended pressures for tubeless tires.

Your sig reeks of the assumed superiority of your opinion
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Old 06-21-24, 05:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm
Buy a new bike? Seriously? Run the 25's with 65psi? I don't think so
Old bike, 25s as tubeless on old rims which are not even meant to have tubeless in the first place on these and I run them at 85-90 PSI with conti GP5000 TR tires. No flats yet in 2 years but that is coming I am sure as they are worn out. I also like the fact that I need to top up less than when I used latex tubes. I will probably go back to latex tubes on this one though as I don't really ride it as much as I did.





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Old 06-21-24, 07:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm
What assumptions? Here we have it right out in full view of the women and children. Soap, Sealant, Tape, Air Compressors, St. Andrew's Crosses, egads. I am not worthy. Nothing superior from this quarter. I acknowledge my deficiencies in not being able to give up the tube.
Apparently the OP has tried tubeless and decided it's not worth the effort for him. As I wrote in Post #3, it's not for everyone.

You haven't tried it, but have decided against it -- again, a perfectly reasonable choice. The pushback you (and one or two other posters) are receiving is against nonsense claims about tubeless which you insist on putting out here in a public forum.


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Old 06-21-24, 08:01 AM
  #140  
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm
What assumptions? Here we have it right out in full view of the women and children. Soap, Sealant, Tape, Air Compressors, St. Andrew's Crosses, egads. I am not worthy. Nothing superior from this quarter. I acknowledge my deficiencies in not being able to give up the tube.
All rims minus some oddball stuff needs rim tape and all tire setups minus those old school ultra vintage solid rubber tires need air in some form and an inflator or CO2 makes quick work whether tube or tubeless.. Soap can be helpful to set any bead which you need to do on any tire I don't think I have used it more than once in all the tires I have installed included a bunch of tubeless stuff. In terms of crosses and egads you don't need those under any set up but if you want to use it I guess it won't do anything just waste time. Sealant has been common in the automotive world for quite a while and for bicycles for quite a while in fact they also make sealant for tubes for quite some time.

One could argue with tubed set ups you have patches and glue and if you get a puncture it won't seal itself so you have to remove the wheel and replace the tube and that can be a pain (not really hugely unless raining but for the sake of argument).

Tubes are still fine though if that is what you want to use, go for it but acting as if tubeless is the most difficult thing in the world or that it requires a massively different set up that is foreign or people are pushing you to have tubeless on a vintage bike, is just wrong. Though yes you should get a new bike, this is a bike forum, people are not going to go against the absolute working formula of N+1 it is scientifically proven the world over and undeniably true.


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Old 06-21-24, 09:19 AM
  #141  
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As with so many threads, after half-a-dozen or more pages of bickering, everyone realizes that "To each his or her own" is the best answer.

If the thread runs true to type, there will be some who will not be able to accept that no matter what.
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Old 06-21-24, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs
As with so many threads, after half-a-dozen or more pages of bickering, everyone realizes that "To each his or her own" is the best answer.

If the thread runs true to type, there will be some who will not be able to accept that no matter what.
Along those lines ...

Who is sick of tubeless maintenance threads?
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Old 06-21-24, 11:26 AM
  #143  
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Don't forget "Disc brakes will cut your throat," "Di2 is electrocution just waiting to happen," and "A 750W e-motor is just like going to a larger cog in the back."
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Old 06-21-24, 11:52 AM
  #144  
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv
Don't forget "Disc brakes will cut your throat," "Di2 is electrocution just waiting to happen," and "A 750W e-motor is just like going to a larger cog in the back."
Or the sage warning: "You'll poke your eye out!"
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Old 06-21-24, 12:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Eric F
Of course not. People sure of the superiority of their position tend to find ways to justify it, including exaggeration and nonsensical assumptions.
Careful there, Eric. Over the years, we ride with many of the same jokesters:
Tom, Mike, Michael, Jim, Jim, Brian, Gaurav, Eric, Mitch, John, etc. No doubt you can picture them getting the jabs in!
And a few of them DO ride with $2k tubeless wheelsets with $100ea high-end tires. And displayed a gooey roadside mess.
At any rate, my tubeless-ready Dura Ace wheelset is just that. Ready for using them, but not gonna take the plunge.
You and your ilk sure get defensive. Methinks doth protest too much! And far too much effort trying to discredit opposing views.
Ease up, amigo.
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Old 06-21-24, 01:46 PM
  #146  
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Originally Posted by base2
Or the sage warning: "You'll poke your eye out!"
How about "you're going to break your neck"? Yikes! I already did that twice
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Old 06-21-24, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by roadcrankr
Careful there, Eric. Over the years, we ride with many of the same jokesters:
Tom, Mike, Michael, Jim, Jim, Brian, Gaurav, Eric, Mitch, John, etc. No doubt you can picture them getting the jabs in!
And a few of them DO ride with $2k tubeless wheelsets with $100ea high-end tires. And displayed a gooey roadside mess.
At any rate, my tubeless-ready Dura Ace wheelset is just that. Ready for using them, but not gonna take the plunge.
You and your ilk sure get defensive. Methinks doth protest too much! And far too much effort trying to discredit opposing views.
Ease up, amigo.
I ride with $2k tubeless wheels and high-end tires. I've also had roadside issues with them, but still believe that tubeless the right choice for me. I'm not sure what you're getting at.

My issue is not that someone else has an opposing opinion or preference. If you think tubeless isn't for you, cool. My issue is when there is an attempt to justify the contrary opinion with nonsense and an attitude of superiority.
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Old 06-21-24, 04:12 PM
  #148  
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Originally Posted by Eric F
I ride with $2k tubeless wheels and high-end tires. I've also had roadside issues with them, but still believe that tubeless the right choice for me. I'm not sure what you're getting at.

My issue is not that someone else has an opposing opinion or preference. If you think tubeless isn't for you, cool. My issue is when there is an attempt to justify the contrary opinion with nonsense and an attitude of superiority.
Here is a minion for Big Tubeless at it again:

Here are the facts:
Every time using a tube is mentioned we are jumped on and viciously and violently attacked for daring to even mention using an inner tube
Tubeless tires will blow up in your face every time and send liquid shrapnel into your eyes causing blindness
Tubeless tires cost at least $20k
Tubeless tires are impossible to install and you have to have spend a minimum of 5 days installing one before you can even consider riding and by that time you will need to clean the entire tire and put new sealant in which costs another 800-900 dollars
My cousin's friends uncle's former roommate back in college tried tubeless and he broke out in a rash and died
Big Tubeless is trying to insert microchips into the sealant and control your tires with Vatican controlled nano-bots
You aren't allowed to call yourself a cyclist if you aren't using tubeless tires on everything
All tubeless tires have to be exactly 65 PSI.


This is irrefutable evidence that cannot be refuted in any capacity. You will notice nobody in the entire history of bicycle inner tubes has ever had a single problem EVER yet tubeless probably causes multiple deaths per month.




















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Old 06-21-24, 04:20 PM
  #149  
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe
Yes.

I bought two wheel sets from lightbicycle. The first for road no holes and I think it's great. Been several year now. I don't know how much of pain it is going to replace a broken spoke though. I hope it's not crazy expensive.

The 2nd carbon wheels was for the mtb and they did not offer no holes for the rim I bought for some reason.

I find it difficult to put the tubeless tape on perfect and it's expensive to redo it five times to get it perfect so I just get it good enough. So far so good.

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Old 06-21-24, 04:33 PM
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I have always used tubes. I decided to watch all of the Park Tool videos on tubeless setup, just to understand the process. I don't ride 5000 miles a year, closer to 1000 miles maybe. I have not had a flat issue, only two flats in 8000 miles on this bike, none since I went with nice soft and supple Continental GatorHardshells. I'd have to ride a bike with them side by side to see how much more pleasurable the ride would be. Maybe I am a glutton for punishment, but I often commute to work on my road bike and have to be there. Tubeless seems like a lot more work than I am personally willing to devote to bike maintenance. Ok I am lazy, said it. I do most of my own maintenance, which is frankly pretty infrequent for the miles I ride, but not major stuff, crank, headset, etc. Not sure If my Aksium wheels are tubeless compatible, but maybe the next set of wheels I get will have the option. I envision spilling this stuff on the floor every time, followed by some F-bombs.
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