Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

What Do I Really Need?

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

What Do I Really Need?

Old 10-31-05, 07:52 AM
  #1  
foxden
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 111
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
What Do I Really Need?

Bought a hybrid last week and should be picking it up next week. A Raleigh Passage 5.0. I know the shop was filled with accessories, but what do I really need besides a helmet for safety, and a place to hold water if I am out for a while?

Any brands to look for or avoid on items?
foxden is offline  
Old 10-31-05, 08:09 AM
  #2  
The Seldom Kill
imminent danger
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 739
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
A lock. Many schools of thought will be proposed on this subject regarding needs and configuration with many compelling arguments. Before the shouting begins I would advise that whatever system you do not skimp in any fashion in this area, always buy something with a Sold Secure certificate and that whatever you use meets the conditions of your insurance.

Spare inner. Get two of them, you'll use them sooner or later.

Tire levers. Don't buy metal and be prepared to try a few until you find a type that's right for you.

Puncture repair kit. If you're tires are over 60psi then do not use self-adhesive as they have a tendancy to leak. Vulcanising solution patches will last longer then the seams of the tire if applied properly.

Hand-pump. Topeak Morph is the pump du jour at the moment. Worth the money if you're likely to get caught more than 10 miles from home or a friendly shop. Otherwise a mini will suffice. CO2 Canisters will get recommended but cost vs. value is to be thought about before buying.

Track-pump. If you don't have a Morph or similar, get one of these. BETO, Joe Blow are two good ones.

Minitool. Should at least have all the allen keys you need, a phillips and a stanley screwdriver.
The Seldom Kill is offline  
Old 10-31-05, 02:11 PM
  #3  
John Wilke
Senior Member
 
John Wilke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Milwaukee
Posts: 3,917
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Yup, I'd go with the spare inner tubes, plastic tire irons, and a frame pump. See if they'll throw in a water bottle with the shop's logo on it for free. At least now you know that you'll get home if you get a flat tire just as you see that big rain cloud chasing you down!

John Wilke
Milwaukee
John Wilke is offline  
Old 10-31-05, 02:15 PM
  #4  
Boudicca
Conquer Cancer rider
 
Boudicca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Toronto
Posts: 6,039

Bikes: Fun bike, city bike, Bike Friday, Brompton (also fun bikes)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Lights, if you aim to be riding at night.
__________________
Zero gallons to the mile
Boudicca is offline  
Old 10-31-05, 02:18 PM
  #5  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 52,010

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 139 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3157 Post(s)
Liked 417 Times in 250 Posts
Along with the seat pack, multi-tool (Topeak Alien), tubes, patch kit, levers, pump (Topeak Road Morph), and your choice of food ... which you will bring with you on every ride ...

You should also bring KNOWLEDGE. In other words, all that stuff will do you no good at all if you don't know how to use it. If you have no idea how to change a tire or do some basic repairs on your bicycle, take a class to teach you. At the very least, get the people at the shop where you are picking up your bicycle to go through the process of changing tires with you ... and then practice till you feel comfortable with it.

In addition to that, you might also consider ... padded shorts, gloves, jersey, cycling jacket, etc. etc. etc.
Machka is offline  
Old 10-31-05, 02:53 PM
  #6  
Portis
Banned.
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Home alone
Posts: 6,018

Bikes: Trek 4300 X 2. Trek 1000, Trek 6000

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Your most immediate need will be addressing the issue of flat tires. Everything you need has been mentioned above. If you don't like to flat, put Slime in your tires. This is a suprisingly controversial topic. HOwever, i prefer to ride as opposed to changing flats. Especially in the cold and the dark. Others say it is too messy and makes your wheels weigh too much.

Remember that you only put 4 oz in each tire. So you be the judge...are you worried about 8 extra ounces on your wheels? Not I. At least not on my mountain bikes. I don't run slime in the road bike tires. Also you don't need a lock unless you will be leaving your bike unattended. I never leave mine that way because i always leave on the bike and return on the bike and then hang it in the garage.

Enjoy your new bike!
Portis is offline  
Old 10-31-05, 03:19 PM
  #7  
AndrewP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Montreal
Posts: 6,521

Bikes: Peugeot Hybrid, Minelli Hybrid

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
If you plan to go out for day rides to enjoy yourself, get a handlebar bag for carrying maps, snacks, camera and possibly a rain jacket.
AndrewP is offline  
Old 10-31-05, 03:37 PM
  #8  
Keith99
Senior Member
 
Keith99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 5,866
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Machka
Along with the seat pack, multi-tool (Topeak Alien), tubes, patch kit, levers, pump (Topeak Road Morph), and your choice of food ... which you will bring with you on every ride ...

You should also bring KNOWLEDGE. In other words, all that stuff will do you no good at all if you don't know how to use it. If you have no idea how to change a tire or do some basic repairs on your bicycle, take a class to teach you. At the very least, get the people at the shop where you are picking up your bicycle to go through the process of changing tires with you ... and then practice till you feel comfortable with it.

In addition to that, you might also consider ... padded shorts, gloves, jersey, cycling jacket, etc. etc. etc.
I'd add a cool tool or the like. Mainly for the chain breaker included. BUT that is worrying about what might happen. Knowing how to change a tire is worrying about what WILL happen. Change out a tire at home at your comfort, with the tools you will have on the bike. Then you will KNOW what to do when you flat on teh road. Oh and do the rear tire. If you can change a rear tire you can change a front, the reverse is not true and at least on the road about 2/3 of all flats are on the rear.
Keith99 is offline  
Old 10-31-05, 04:40 PM
  #9  
cooker
Prefers Cicero
 
cooker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 12,841

Bikes: 1984 Trek 520; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others

Mentioned: 86 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3905 Post(s)
Liked 73 Times in 62 Posts
Lots of advice here which is all good, but don't let it overwhelm you, if you just plan (at first) to ride leisurely in daylight hours within walking distance of home, so you can get home if you have a breakdown.

All the other stuff people mentioned will come in handy if you plan to ride more seriously.

Robert

ps. pant leg clips or velcro straps if you plan to ride in long pants.
cooker is offline  
Old 10-31-05, 05:43 PM
  #10  
webist
Huachuca Rider
 
webist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 4,275

Bikes: Fuji CCR1, Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I don't want to add to an overwhelming list of needs. I'd just mention gloves with a bit of padding. I found they really added to my comfort on long rides. Though I have not put them to the test, I am told that protection for the hands is important should one fall.
__________________
Just Peddlin' Around
webist is offline  
Old 10-31-05, 06:42 PM
  #11  
Boudicca
Conquer Cancer rider
 
Boudicca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Toronto
Posts: 6,039

Bikes: Fun bike, city bike, Bike Friday, Brompton (also fun bikes)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Did anyone mention a bell? Although I find it's much more effective just to yell at the jaywalking pedestrians rather than tinkle a rather inadequate bell at them.
__________________
Zero gallons to the mile
Boudicca is offline  
Old 10-31-05, 07:05 PM
  #12  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 52,010

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 139 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3157 Post(s)
Liked 417 Times in 250 Posts
Originally Posted by Boudicca
Did anyone mention a bell? Although I find it's much more effective just to yell at the jaywalking pedestrians rather than tinkle a rather inadequate bell at them.
Well, it is the law to have a bell where I live ... so that might be something worth checking.

It is also the law to have lights, even if you're not riding at night, but no more than two headlights. Go figure.
Machka is offline  
Old 10-31-05, 08:28 PM
  #13  
Brian
Senior Member
 
Brian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Between the mountains and the lake.
Posts: 16,681

Bikes: 8 bikes - one for each day of the week!

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Never ever ask what you need. When it comes to cycling, what you want is far more important.
Brian is offline  
Old 10-31-05, 09:18 PM
  #14  
supcom
You need a new bike
 
supcom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 5,433
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Definitely padded bike shorts and flat repair stuff and chain lube and gloves and water bottles and a seatbag and a rear blinking light and a headlight and a cyclocomputer and.... Oh man, it just doesn't ever stop.

And that's a good thing!
supcom is offline  
Old 10-31-05, 09:26 PM
  #15  
crazybikerchick
Senior Member
 
crazybikerchick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: the Georgia Strait
Posts: 961

Bikes: Devinci Caribou, Kona Dew Plus, Raleigh Twenty

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Boudicca
Did anyone mention a bell? Although I find it's much more effective just to yell at the jaywalking pedestrians rather than tinkle a rather inadequate bell at them.
It is actually useful for city traffic as well. I've been riding along, a car in the left lane is about to make a lane change right into me and after a sharp bling veers back sharply to the left. Can't guarantee people locked in their steel boxes with stereos will always hear you but certainly it can't hurt. Also good to wake up people trying to make turns but only have their head cranked to look at traffic in one direction. (and not at you)
crazybikerchick is offline  
Old 10-31-05, 09:41 PM
  #16  
crazybikerchick
Senior Member
 
crazybikerchick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: the Georgia Strait
Posts: 961

Bikes: Devinci Caribou, Kona Dew Plus, Raleigh Twenty

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by foxden
Bought a hybrid last week and should be picking it up next week. A Raleigh Passage 5.0. I know the shop was filled with accessories, but what do I really need besides a helmet for safety, and a place to hold water if I am out for a while?

Any brands to look for or avoid on items?
What do you plan to do with it? Do you plan to ride it recreationally or for transportation? Do you plan on going mostly for short rides or longer rides?

If you want to run short errands, a basket might be useful to hold things.
If you want to commute with it, a rear rack is useful to tie things to or attach panniers for more carrying capacity.
A lock if you want to leave your bike anywhere unattended for a bit, even if you don't plan on it, you might see somewhere you want to stop and grab a bite on a ride. Get a good quality u-lock (not the old kind with the cylinder lock, you can pick those with a bic pen)
If you're mostly interested in fitness, you'll probably find a bike computer a good motivation tool to know how far and fast you go. (I like the Cateye computers)
If there's any chance you might ride after dark, (or get caught after dark if you plan to commute) a headlight and taillight (not just reflectors) are essential.
If your seat gets sore, you may find padded bike shorts comfortable.
If your hands get sore, (or you plan on doing very long rides) padded gloves are helpful. They also avoid asphalt on your hands if you crash.
If you plan to ride with heavy traffic you may find a rearview mirror helpful to see whats going on behind you (though for changing your position its essential to shoulder check anyway)
If you plan on doing fast recreational rides where you'll sweat a lot you might like a bike jersey since they are made of wicking material and have pockets in the back to hold a spare tube, a granola bar, wallet, keys whatnot.

You need a plan for what to do if something breaks down on your trip. This might just be take a cellphone and call someone, or having tools to effect your own repairs. A spare tube and a frame pump (much easier to pump a tire from flat than with a small jersey-sized pump) are the minimum you need. Whether you need plastic tire levers depends on how tight the wheels are on your rims, one bike I have I need levers, the other I can easily change a flat with my hands only. Allen keys can be useful for tightening things that have become loose.

Oh and some chain lube to apply periodically.

Just start by riding!! It will soon become apparent what things you might find useful for you!
crazybikerchick is offline  
Old 11-01-05, 06:32 AM
  #17  
MichaelW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: England
Posts: 12,948
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I regard gloves as essential, the same as a helmet. If you take a spill (and I have had three), gloves save your palms from being skinned to the bone. One of my leather gloves has 1mm of hide abbraded away.A hand injury is really dissabling and takes ages to heal.
MichaelW is offline  
Old 11-01-05, 06:59 AM
  #18  
lws
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 211
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
eye protection. I would say this is even more important than a helmet, since a helmet only helps you after you crash, and a 20 mph bug in the eye can easily *cause* a crash. Cheap sunglasses are adequate, though you can easily spend $100 if you want to.
lws is offline  
Old 11-01-05, 08:58 AM
  #19  
DataJunkie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 14,277
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
If you are riding in cold weather kleenex is a nice item to have. My flippin nose keeps running below 40 degrees.
DataJunkie is offline  
Old 11-01-05, 12:30 PM
  #20  
supcom
You need a new bike
 
supcom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 5,433
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by DataJunkie
If you are riding in cold weather kleenex is a nice item to have. My flippin nose keeps running below 40 degrees.
That's why they put terrycloth patches on gloves!
supcom is offline  
Old 11-01-05, 06:31 PM
  #21  
froze
Banned.
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Posts: 4,761

Bikes: 84 Trek 660 Suntour Superbe; 87 Giant Rincon Shimano XT; 07 Mercian Vincitore Campy Veloce

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Depends on how far out your going to ride and are you going ride. Regardless your going to need a pump and some modern mini's are as good as frame pumps but weigh less such as the Barberi Titan mini that can reach 140psi, your LBS may have a another brand that is just as good.

You also need a patch kit; I happen to like glueless because their faster and no matter what anyone tells they last the life of the tube. I've been using glueless patches for about 8 years and never had any issues. You should also carry a spare tube and tire irons. Of course you should know how to fix your own flats! If not, practice at home several times till you get it; better to practice first then try doing it for the first time on the road.

Your going to need a saddle bag to carry all your junk.

After that a tire boot for repairing tires; a mini tool might be useful, I like the Park MTB3 but there are a bunch out there so take your pick.

If your going to riding after dark then guess what? Yep you need lights; Cateye LD600 for the rear is a very bright light but mount it vertically for the best effect. Cygolite makes very good halogen headlights at low cost take your pick from $48 for 13 watts on up for brighter lights. A front flasher like Vistalight Nebula is a good idea because the flasher will attract a drivers attention to you whereas the headlight will not.

Some odds and ends the LBS can't help you with, cash in case you need to use a phone or buy something like grub or drink; get an ID card from your BMV or DMV and carry that in your bag instead of your drivers license; and spare batteries for whatever you might have that requires bats.
froze is offline  
Old 11-01-05, 07:21 PM
  #22  
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Posts: 30,023

Bikes: Catrike 559 I own some others but they don't get ridden very much.

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1498 Post(s)
Liked 452 Times in 268 Posts
Originally Posted by foxden
Bought a hybrid last week and should be picking it up next week. A Raleigh Passage 5.0. I know the shop was filled with accessories, but what do I really need besides a helmet for safety, and a place to hold water if I am out for a while?

Any brands to look for or avoid on items?
I think that you've already got the idea. Just ride and you'll figure out for yourself what works for you. I generally just carry enough stuff with me to fix one flat tire. Some guys carry enough tools and such to overhaul their whole bicycle and have a picnic on the side of the road along with a cell phone to call a cab if that doesn't work.
Retro Grouch is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.