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Got my Esge double kickstand. Some questions.

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Got my Esge double kickstand. Some questions.

Old 11-05-05, 09:56 AM
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Savas
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Got my Esge double kickstand. Some questions.

I installed this new kickstand yesterday. The Esge Double Kickstand works quite well. Iíve got a few questions to help improve my experience with this new kickstand. It didnít come with instructions or packaging.

Some background: Bike is Ď05 Jamis Coda flat bar bike. Wheels are 700c x 25ís.

1.) There is a faint listing one way when on the kickstand, not totally balanced. Can this be adjusted mechanically or is some tilt to be expected with these?

2.) Are the legs expected to be cut to size for your bike? Itís got markings on it. Presenty, the there is a six inch gap between the bottom of the tire and the floor - the increased upward angle of the bike causes the front wheel to turn one way or the other completely around.

3.) What kind of metal are the legs made out of?

4.) What is considered proper distance between the tire bottom and the floor? (I will always use the 700c size wheels)

5.) My Freddy Fenders bracket prevents me from pushing the kickstand back with enough tolerance to totally clear a derailleur wire, which is being slightly pushed by the kickstand. Is this OK?

Any assistance by experienced Esge owners would be appreciated.
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Old 11-05-05, 12:05 PM
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Keep in mind that the guy who designed your kickstand probably isn't related in any way to the guy who designed the kickstand. You can expect to make some modifications if you want to get everything to align perfectly.

To correct the "list" file a tiny bit off of whichever leg it too tall.

You can shorten the legs to reduce the amount of front-to-back tilt. It's easier to cut a little bit more off than it is to glue it back on.

The legs are probably aluminum die castings.

There's no reason to worry about the shifter cable running across the mounting bracket.
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Old 11-05-05, 05:19 PM
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The really important point is the damage the kickstand may do to the b/b shell area if you do not have the brazed on attachment for use with a kickstand. The pressures required to stop the stand from skewing mean that the tubes are likely to be compressed and distorted.
Again it is not only the length of the legs but the angle of the cut at the bottom of the feet which is important. I found that the addition of rubber sockets on the feet helped stability enormously. Remember that you will require to clip the front wheel to the frame in some way (rubber bungee) to avoid the wheel swinging back and causing the bike to fall.
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Old 11-05-05, 07:25 PM
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I cut mine down to about the 270 mark, i don't know if that's for any 700c bike, but you are supossed to cut them down, yeah. A little file work to fine tune them after the cut.

You might be able to file down the bracket to keep the derailleur cable from touching if it bothers you, or use a little cloth tape for padding otherwise. I filed mine back a skosh for the cable clearance.
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Old 11-05-05, 08:46 PM
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I was wondering, these seem like fine kickstands.. how much do they weigh? I am NOT a weight weenie but i do ride a folder that i need to lift often.. Still i would love a super stable stand like this one, also when working on my bike.
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Old 11-06-05, 06:25 AM
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A kick stand for a weight weenie looks like a tree.

These kick stands are nice and stable. Weight is a good pound, maybe a little more. Don't expect them to fit onto everything.
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Old 11-06-05, 08:51 AM
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Thanks for the reponses. I had put 1/16" thick plumber's rubber in between the mechanically fastened components to try and protect my frame. Rubber was cut to conform to perimeter of the parts and holes drilled where needed. Hope this helps. I have not done any cutting yet, but was farting around with it while waiting for BF responses. An interesting thing came up in the mean time. It seems on my bike, one inch of leg length sort of translates into two inches of distance from front wheel to the floor. Here's how I found out. There was some gaps in my deck, so I took the bike out and dropped the kickstand legs into the gap, so wheels contacted the wood. Taped the kickstand off to mark the legs. Brought the bike back inside to measure where the tape marks were; measuring vertically, not following the leg slopes. It was weird to discover this. Understandably, Esge could not provide rubber caps to put on the bottom of the legs, as they change in width depending upon where you cut them. But it would be great to find caps with a rounded bottom that will fit - this will eliminate having to try and cut the legs at a precise angle so that they lay flush with the ground. In addition, even if the legs were cut flush to the ground, in general, ground surfaces where I might park the bike are uneven, so a rounded bottom will solve this efficiently. Next stop is the hardware store in search of rubber caps. I am estimating somewhere around an inch or so clearance between the front tire bottom and the ground. And I will enlist my reluctant wife to help out, holding a level on bike so that the cuts might address the slight tilt of the bike when on the kickstand. Ordinarily, this might be a waste of time, again considering ground is uneven at times. But when the bike is at home, it will look a lot better being totally upright. It would be cool to invent a little device that clamps onto the bottom tube that securely stays in position, but can be pushed down to engage the wheel and prevent the steering mechanism from turning.
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Old 11-06-05, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Savas
It would be cool to invent a little device that clamps onto the bottom tube that securely stays in position, but can be pushed down to engage the wheel and prevent the steering mechanism from turning.
You're too late. The gizmo that you are referring to is/was called a "flick stand". Unfortunately, I don't know where to get one anymore.
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Old 11-06-05, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Savas
It would be cool to invent a little device that clamps onto the bottom tube that securely stays in position, but can be pushed down to engage the wheel and prevent the steering mechanism from turning.

you could call it a Flikstand or something like that

I wouldn't worry about end caps for your kickstand unless you have slate floors in your garage.
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Old 11-07-05, 04:54 PM
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Well, the job is done and it came out good. Bike is level left to right and the front tire is around one inch off the ground when on the kickstand. Ends of the legs are flush with the ground. It was some job trying to do this with the kickstand on the bike, but I figured it was best so that I could achieve the result I was after. I made three stacks of books, two at one level and one less high. Stood the bike level on the two high stacks with the kickstand legs hanging down in air, with a clamp holding a tire to help steady it (my wife helped for safetyís sake). I pushed the shorter stack of books against the kickstand legs and took one of those tools you use to copy and transfer unusual shapes. Pushed it against the legs and it conformed around the leg on three sides. A carbide scribe was used to trace the horizontal line around the legs. Then it came time for the cutting. Laid the bike down flat. Hack-sawed those suckers off. Filed them slightly for flatness and then did a little to reduce sharpness around the edges. Then, the moment of glory - picked it up and set it down on the kickstand. HOORAY! I did not mangle a costly set of kickstand legs. Did myself proud.
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Old 11-08-05, 12:36 AM
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I don't have an ESGE, but I can tell you the my two-footed stand doesn't lean to either side, despite the fact that the front wheel may turn to a side since it is lifted off the ground.
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Old 11-08-05, 01:28 AM
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I would lock-thread the mounting bolt !

My Trek 520 balances real well with the ESGE. I can set the bike on the front or back tire. Maybe with the rear rack adding weight ?
I didn't trim any off the legs because it helps using it as a work stand.
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Old 11-08-05, 07:31 AM
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Originally Posted by hillyman
I would lock-thread the mounting bolt !

My Trek 520 balances real well with the ESGE. I can set the bike on the front or back tire. Maybe with the rear rack adding weight ?
I didn't trim any off the legs because it helps using it as a work stand.
I might try thread lock. The rubber I put between components to prevent scratches might also have the side benefit of absorbing some jitters that can work screws loose. Yes, if you add weight to the back, bike will want to rest on the rear tire. Mine did the same thing as yours before I loaded her up. Esge makes a good work stand, especially if you stabilize the top tube or seat as an assist. I will be using a hitch-mounted bike automobile rack as a work stand. My chain got way to messy recently ...
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