Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Surly LHT - How is the handling?

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Surly LHT - How is the handling?

Old 12-02-05, 03:49 AM
  #1  
georgiaboy
Retro-nerd
Thread Starter
 
georgiaboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Morningside - Atlanta
Posts: 1,585

Bikes: 1991 Serotta Colorado II, 1986 Vitus 979, 1971 Juene Classic, 2008 Surly Crosscheck, 1949 Riva Sport

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I will be building a bicycle for light touring/commuting. With a frame like the LHT you can't "ride before you buy." So, I am trying to get a virtual reality test ride through your comments.

I know the LHT frame is strong and well-built. I will not be doing any loaded touring.

I am looking for responses regarding "feel" of the frame.

Is it heavy and slow? Does the frame make for a quick commuter?

Is is nimble and fast?

Could I with the right wheels and gearing build a bicycle with the LHT frame that is not a racing bicycle, but one that is fairly speedy and handles well?

I am not trying to set speed records. But I do want to want a bike where I can turn it up a notch if I want.
__________________
Would you like a dream with that?

Last edited by georgiaboy; 12-02-05 at 03:54 AM.
georgiaboy is offline  
Old 12-02-05, 05:05 AM
  #2  
CdCf
Videre non videri
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Posts: 3,208

Bikes: 1 road bike (simple, light), 1 TT bike (could be more aero, could be lighter), 1 all-weather commuter and winter bike, 1 Monark 828E ergometer indoor bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I found mine to be very nimble but also stable. If I had built it up with light-weight road components, I'm sure I could've brought the weight down to around 22 lbs. I'm not sure how the long chainstays affect the springiness, but I would imagine that a modern road bike with short stays is stiffer.
CdCf is offline  
Old 12-02-05, 05:57 AM
  #3  
michaelnel
Macaws Rock!
 
michaelnel's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 1,513

Bikes: 2005 Soma Doublecross

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The LHT is a cool frame, but doesn't seem to me to be suitable for what you want to do with the bicycle. I mean, it would do it fine, but its strengths are aimed at heavy loaded touring. Personally, I think for your needs as stated you should be looking at a cyclocross frame like the Surly Crosscheck or Soma Doublecross.
__________________
---

San Francisco, California
michaelnel is offline  
Old 12-02-05, 07:46 AM
  #4  
CdCf
Videre non videri
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Posts: 3,208

Bikes: 1 road bike (simple, light), 1 TT bike (could be more aero, could be lighter), 1 all-weather commuter and winter bike, 1 Monark 828E ergometer indoor bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
In reality, I honestly doubt you'd notice much difference.

An unexpected bonus is that my pump fits behind the seatstay!
CdCf is offline  
Old 12-02-05, 07:48 AM
  #5  
Cyclaholic
CRIKEY!!!!!!!
 
Cyclaholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 4,265

Bikes: several

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 795 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by michaelnel
The LHT is a cool frame, but doesn't seem to me to be suitable for what you want to do with the bicycle. I mean, it would do it fine, but its strengths are aimed at heavy loaded touring. Personally, I think for your needs as stated you should be looking at a cyclocross frame like the Surly Crosscheck or Soma Doublecross.
Sorry dude but I couldn't disagree more. I think the LHT is exactly what he needs.

I built my LHT several months ago and I have over two an a half thousand commuting miles on her. In short, if I had to replace her I'd replace her with the exact same bike. The geometry is all about rock steadiness but I can throw her around when I have to, just today I had a fool pedestrian wander out in front of me as I was cruising along at 20mph, I ended up on the grass and had to bunnyhop a 3" step back onto the pavement, nimble enough to execute those sorts of crazy maneouvers when you have to and stable enough to not buck you off when you do end up on rougher terrain.

I didn't build mine with lightness in mind, I'm not sure what the all up weight is with my commuting load but I can tell you that I'm not shy about a bit of street racing with anyone that wants to have a go. I've shamed lots of guys on more exotic (much lighter) machines. I usually amble along at around 20 - 22mph, I can sit on 25 - 27mph for extended periods if I have to, and I have sprinted well up into the high 30's... all with a full commuting load on.

Judging by your criteria you're thinking exactly as I was when I built mine. First of all don't skimp on the wheels if you want reliability. I have two sets of wheels/tires, the day-to-day regular heavy duty wheels that I built myself which are 36 spoke Deore LX mountain bike hubs, Mavic M319 front rim and M719 rear rim, laced with DT Swiss Alpine III forged spokes on a 4-cross pattern, they're fitted with 28mm Conti Ultra Gatorskins. I ride them with no mercy over anything and everything at crazy speeds and they remain as true as day 1.

My other wheelset is a pair of Shimano 550's with the same tires in 23mm, not bad wheels for the price I just have to remember not to be so rough with them otherwise they need truing up.

She also has a Deore LX groupset with a triple crank and 11 - 34 casette, M520 pedals, Ritchie Pro comp headset, Profile cowhorn bars, Dura-Ace barend shifters, Dia-compe 280V brake levers pulling Deore LX V-brakes... awesome stopping power and control!, Topeak rack and trunk bag, and a pair of Vaude panniers.

This is an early photo when I just finished her. She now has Profile Airwing aerobars, a 20watt light, a different (much nicer) seat, an a few other bits. I'll post a more recent pic if you're interested.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
truck1.jpg (98.9 KB, 192 views)
File Type: jpg
truck2.jpg (99.1 KB, 108 views)
Cyclaholic is offline  
Old 12-02-05, 08:24 AM
  #6  
Bekologist
totally louche
 
Bekologist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: A land that time forgot
Posts: 18,025

Bikes: the ever shifting stable loaded with comfortable road bikes and city and winter bikes

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I think a 'tweener' frame with 132.5 spacing in the back would give you more versatility than the LHT.

At the same time, my LHT is nimble, handles responsively, and so stable I can grab a drink going 40. The crowned fork is a nice touch and may contribute to handling, I don't know.

Speed is a feature of the horsepower though, not the frame.
Bekologist is offline  
Old 12-02-05, 05:05 PM
  #7  
Treespeed
Warning:Mild Peril
 
Treespeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Seattle Refugee in Los Angeles
Posts: 3,171

Bikes: Cilo, Surly Pacer, Kona Fire Mountain w/Bob Trailer, Scattante

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If you're not doing any loaded touring than I would go with the Surly Pacer instead of the LHT. It's a little easier to "turn it up a notch" with a nice set of road wheels instead of the 26" setup on the LHT. But you still have all the eyelets and clearance you need for racks and fenders when you need them.

My Pacer isn't the lightest setup, but it is a seriously smooth ride and I'm so looking forward to knocking out a century on her this spring.
__________________
Non semper erit aestas.
Treespeed is offline  
Old 12-02-05, 05:23 PM
  #8  
late
Senior Member
 
late's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 8,545
Mentioned: 84 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8602 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 18 Times in 18 Posts
There are lots of other steel frames.
Just as an example,I ride a Gunnar Sport, which is a sporty frame
that can do lite touring and commuting.
http://www.gunnarbikes.com/sport.php

I did a 5 day tour on it this summer.
late is offline  
Old 12-02-05, 10:49 PM
  #9  
Cyclaholic
CRIKEY!!!!!!!
 
Cyclaholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 4,265

Bikes: several

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 795 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by Treespeed
If you're not doing any loaded touring than I would go with the Surly Pacer instead of the LHT. It's a little easier to "turn it up a notch" with a nice set of road wheels instead of the 26" setup on the LHT. But you still have all the eyelets and clearance you need for racks and fenders when you need them.

My Pacer isn't the lightest setup, but it is a seriously smooth ride and I'm so looking forward to knocking out a century on her this spring.
The pacer looks like a nice frame but it doen't seem to have brazeons for a rack, only fenders (on the Surly website) does yours have the brazeons for a rack?

I considered the LHT, Pacer, and crosscheck. The LHT won me over because of the greater heel clearance for my panniers, the 3rd bottle cage mount, and the more stable geometry for load carrying.

My LHT is 700c wheel size.

Last edited by Cyclaholic; 12-02-05 at 10:59 PM.
Cyclaholic is offline  
Old 12-03-05, 02:20 AM
  #10  
bokes
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: SF Bay
Posts: 505
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'd say get the X-Check unless you plan on using full size rackpacks (panniers). I'd bet the LHT would ride a bit stiffer when unloaded, but i'm not sure, I haven't ridden a Surly. But I noticed that my touring bike doesn't flex and ride as smooth as my CX bike until it's fully loaded.
bokes is offline  
Old 12-03-05, 12:19 PM
  #11  
georgiaboy
Retro-nerd
Thread Starter
 
georgiaboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Morningside - Atlanta
Posts: 1,585

Bikes: 1991 Serotta Colorado II, 1986 Vitus 979, 1971 Juene Classic, 2008 Surly Crosscheck, 1949 Riva Sport

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Cyclaholic
Sorry dude but I couldn't disagree more. I think the LHT is exactly what he needs.

I built my LHT several months ago and I have over two an a half thousand commuting miles on her. In short, if I had to replace her I'd replace her with the exact same bike. The geometry is all about rock steadiness but I can throw her around when I have to, just today I had a fool pedestrian wander out in front of me as I was cruising along at 20mph, I ended up on the grass and had to bunnyhop a 3" step back onto the pavement, nimble enough to execute those sorts of crazy maneouvers when you have to and stable enough to not buck you off when you do end up on rougher terrain.

I didn't build mine with lightness in mind, I'm not sure what the all up weight is with my commuting load but I can tell you that I'm not shy about a bit of street racing with anyone that wants to have a go. I've shamed lots of guys on more exotic (much lighter) machines. I usually amble along at around 20 - 22mph, I can sit on 25 - 27mph for extended periods if I have to, and I have sprinted well up into the high 30's... all with a full commuting load on.

Judging by your criteria you're thinking exactly as I was when I built mine. First of all don't skimp on the wheels if you want reliability. I have two sets of wheels/tires, the day-to-day regular heavy duty wheels that I built myself which are 36 spoke Deore LX mountain bike hubs, Mavic M319 front rim and M719 rear rim, laced with DT Swiss Alpine III forged spokes on a 4-cross pattern, they're fitted with 28mm Conti Ultra Gatorskins. I ride them with no mercy over anything and everything at crazy speeds and they remain as true as day 1.

My other wheelset is a pair of Shimano 550's with the same tires in 23mm, not bad wheels for the price I just have to remember not to be so rough with them otherwise they need truing up.

She also has a Deore LX groupset with a triple crank and 11 - 34 casette, M520 pedals, Ritchie Pro comp headset, Profile cowhorn bars, Dura-Ace barend shifters, Dia-compe 280V brake levers pulling Deore LX V-brakes... awesome stopping power and control!, Topeak rack and trunk bag, and a pair of Vaude panniers.

This is an early photo when I just finished her. She now has Profile Airwing aerobars, a 20watt light, a different (much nicer) seat, an a few other bits. I'll post a more recent pic if you're interested.
Thanks for taking the time for such a good answer. I also enjoyed the component listing as well. I wish I knew how to build my on wheels. I am a strong rider. If I could get the weight of this bike at about 22lbs I would be happy.
__________________
Would you like a dream with that?
georgiaboy is offline  
Old 12-03-05, 01:11 PM
  #12  
chipcom 
Infamous Member
 
chipcom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 24,365

Bikes: Surly Big Dummy, Fuji World, 80ish Bianchi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by georgiaboy
Thanks for taking the time for such a good answer. I also enjoyed the component listing as well. I wish I knew how to build my on wheels. I am a strong rider. If I could get the weight of this bike at about 22lbs I would be happy.
Just to put the weight of the bicycle into perspective. My Fuji came stock at 24lbs. I added probably 6 pounds by adding fenders, Brooks saddle, Barley saddlebag w/contents, lights, handlebar bag, etc. I weigh 230lbs and I probably tote another 10lbs for my commute. Thats 270lbs total that I am pushing up and down the road.

Everything else remaining the same, if the bike weighed 2 lbs less (22lbs) that would be an overall decrease in weight of what - .7 percent? If I needed an edge in a competition that might be meaningful, but for commuting and touring, it's not worth worrying about. If I were a fat slob I'd worry more about losing weight off my body, than off my bike. Granted, you probably weigh less than I do (that's a compliment, BTW), so the corresponding percentages would be a little higher, but still not much of a factor to your performance and enjoyment of the bike for your stated purposes. Indeed, if you did want to hang with the club riders, the weight decrease you'd get from just stripping down the commuting/touring specific gear would be more significant, as well as the fact that you may well be a stronger rider anyway because you do slog all that extra weight around on a regular basis.

Just my two-cents on the weight issue.
__________________
"Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey
chipcom is offline  
Old 12-03-05, 01:28 PM
  #13  
georgiaboy
Retro-nerd
Thread Starter
 
georgiaboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Morningside - Atlanta
Posts: 1,585

Bikes: 1991 Serotta Colorado II, 1986 Vitus 979, 1971 Juene Classic, 2008 Surly Crosscheck, 1949 Riva Sport

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by chipcom
Just to put the weight of the bicycle into perspective. My Fuji came stock at 24lbs. I added probably 6 pounds by adding fenders, Brooks saddle, Barley saddlebag w/contents, lights, handlebar bag, etc. I weigh 230lbs and I probably tote another 10lbs for my commute. Thats 270lbs total that I am pushing up and down the road.

Everything else remaining the same, if the bike weighed 2 lbs less (22lbs) that would be an overall decrease in weight of what - .7 percent? If I needed an edge in a competition that might be meaningful, but for commuting and touring, it's not worth worrying about. If I were a fat slob I'd worry more about losing weight off my body, than off my bike. Granted, you probably weigh less than I do (that's a compliment, BTW), so the corresponding percentages would be a little higher, but still not much of a factor to your performance and enjoyment of the bike for your stated purposes. Indeed, if you did want to hang with the club riders, the weight decrease you'd get from just stripping down the commuting/touring specific gear would be more significant, as well as the fact that you may well be a stronger rider anyway because you do slog all that extra weight around on a regular basis.

Just my two-cents on the weight issue.
I am a commuter. I ride 95% of the time by myself. I should be focused on the quality of the bicycle rather than trimming a couple pounds off. Thanks for the wakeup call.
__________________
Would you like a dream with that?
georgiaboy is offline  
Old 12-03-05, 01:39 PM
  #14  
georgiaboy
Retro-nerd
Thread Starter
 
georgiaboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Morningside - Atlanta
Posts: 1,585

Bikes: 1991 Serotta Colorado II, 1986 Vitus 979, 1971 Juene Classic, 2008 Surly Crosscheck, 1949 Riva Sport

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Cyclaholic
Sorry dude but I couldn't disagree more. I think the LHT is exactly what he needs.

I built my LHT several months ago and I have over two an a half thousand commuting miles on her. In short, if I had to replace her I'd replace her with the exact same bike. The geometry is all about rock steadiness but I can throw her around when I have to, just today I had a fool pedestrian wander out in front of me as I was cruising along at 20mph, I ended up on the grass and had to bunnyhop a 3" step back onto the pavement, nimble enough to execute those sorts of crazy maneouvers when you have to and stable enough to not buck you off when you do end up on rougher terrain.

I didn't build mine with lightness in mind, I'm not sure what the all up weight is with my commuting load but I can tell you that I'm not shy about a bit of street racing with anyone that wants to have a go. I've shamed lots of guys on more exotic (much lighter) machines. I usually amble along at around 20 - 22mph, I can sit on 25 - 27mph for extended periods if I have to, and I have sprinted well up into the high 30's... all with a full commuting load on.

Judging by your criteria you're thinking exactly as I was when I built mine. First of all don't skimp on the wheels if you want reliability. I have two sets of wheels/tires, the day-to-day regular heavy duty wheels that I built myself which are 36 spoke Deore LX mountain bike hubs, Mavic M319 front rim and M719 rear rim, laced with DT Swiss Alpine III forged spokes on a 4-cross pattern, they're fitted with 28mm Conti Ultra Gatorskins. I ride them with no mercy over anything and everything at crazy speeds and they remain as true as day 1.

My other wheelset is a pair of Shimano 550's with the same tires in 23mm, not bad wheels for the price I just have to remember not to be so rough with them otherwise they need truing up.

She also has a Deore LX groupset with a triple crank and 11 - 34 casette, M520 pedals, Ritchie Pro comp headset, Profile cowhorn bars, Dura-Ace barend shifters, Dia-compe 280V brake levers pulling Deore LX V-brakes... awesome stopping power and control!, Topeak rack and trunk bag, and a pair of Vaude panniers.

This is an early photo when I just finished her. She now has Profile Airwing aerobars, a 20watt light, a different (much nicer) seat, an a few other bits. I'll post a more recent pic if you're interested.
What are the chain rings sizes on your crank?
__________________
Would you like a dream with that?
georgiaboy is offline  
Old 12-04-05, 02:39 PM
  #15  
2mtr
18 dog baby
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Honolulu
Posts: 400

Bikes: 2008 crosscheck complete, 1984 Pugeot fixed conversion

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I like my Trucker's strength, stability, and ability to take hit after hit. I use it as my all purpose vehicle: everything from going to school, to riding around the island, to working my day job as a messenger.
It's just fine for all these. In fact, I'd say any bike is just fine so long as it doesn't fall apart on you... and the Trucker will not be falling apart any time soon. Someone posted about the rear spacing. I agree with them. If you want to replace your wheel later on, or if you find yourself stuck after a crash or mishap, then the 135mm spacing could be troublesome. I tried to replace my wheel, only to find out that there's only three or four bonnafied touring wheels out there that is, 135 spacing and 700cc rims. And all of those are rather expensive. I ended up having to build a new wheel, cause it would have been cheaper that way.
Also, think about the pedal strike issue. I get that occasionally, even when I'm careful and don't take corners too fast.
I'd say, go for the CrossCheck.
2mtr is offline  
Old 12-04-05, 02:56 PM
  #16  
georgiaboy
Retro-nerd
Thread Starter
 
georgiaboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Morningside - Atlanta
Posts: 1,585

Bikes: 1991 Serotta Colorado II, 1986 Vitus 979, 1971 Juene Classic, 2008 Surly Crosscheck, 1949 Riva Sport

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by 2mtr
I like my Trucker's strength, stability, and ability to take hit after hit. I use it as my all purpose vehicle: everything from going to school, to riding around the island, to working my day job as a messenger.
It's just fine for all these. In fact, I'd say any bike is just fine so long as it doesn't fall apart on you... and the Trucker will not be falling apart any time soon. Someone posted about the rear spacing. I agree with them. If you want to replace your wheel later on, or if you find yourself stuck after a crash or mishap, then the 135mm spacing could be troublesome. I tried to replace my wheel, only to find out that there's only three or four bonnafied touring wheels out there that is, 135 spacing and 700cc rims. And all of those are rather expensive. I ended up having to build a new wheel, cause it would have been cheaper that way.
Also, think about the pedal strike issue. I get that occasionally, even when I'm careful and don't take corners too fast.
I'd say, go for the CrossCheck.
I will be using 26" wheels due to my short stature. That's makes my hubs Deore. So, the 135mm spacing is easy for me at least. Sounds like the LHT frame has the right characteristics for everyday commuting.
__________________
Would you like a dream with that?
georgiaboy is offline  
Old 12-04-05, 03:17 PM
  #17  
CdCf
Videre non videri
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Posts: 3,208

Bikes: 1 road bike (simple, light), 1 TT bike (could be more aero, could be lighter), 1 all-weather commuter and winter bike, 1 Monark 828E ergometer indoor bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Go for it! I'm sure you'll love it!
CdCf is offline  
Old 12-04-05, 03:27 PM
  #18  
Bekologist
totally louche
 
Bekologist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: A land that time forgot
Posts: 18,025

Bikes: the ever shifting stable loaded with comfortable road bikes and city and winter bikes

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
if tis all going to be 26" just take the plunge! LHTs are GREAT bikes!
Bekologist is offline  
Old 12-04-05, 03:32 PM
  #19  
Alekhine
1. e4 Nf6
 
Alekhine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: 7844`W, 4246`N
Posts: 872

Bikes: Mercian KoM with Rohloff, Bike Friday NWT, Pogliaghi Italcorse (1979)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
LHTs are going to save the world. Even though I bought a different frame for myself, I think they're just about the neatest things going for the price these days.
Alekhine is offline  
Old 12-04-05, 04:24 PM
  #20  
DamianM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Cyclaholic, where did you buy your frame ? From Phantom ?
I'm currently toying with the idea of a Cross Check.
DamianM is offline  
Old 12-04-05, 05:05 PM
  #21  
Cyclaholic
CRIKEY!!!!!!!
 
Cyclaholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 4,265

Bikes: several

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 795 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by DamianM
Cyclaholic, where did you buy your frame ? From Phantom ?
I'm currently toying with the idea of a Cross Check.
I got my frame ordered in by ABC Bikes in Liverpool. Best price I could find, better than Phantom by about $50.


Originally Posted by georgiaboy
What are the chain rings sizes on your crank?
48-36-26

Just to give you an idea how good the handling is on this frame, I had a pinch flat at 50mph going down a steep descent, on the aerobars, with a weekend touring load in the rear panniers. The road wasn't as smooth as I remembered it I should have only been doing half that speed at most. Anyhow, I did a bit of damage to the rear rim as it bounced through potholes and cracks while slowing down (I'm 220lb, plus maybe 30lb in the panniers) but the handling was solid, never felt like I was about to go down. Once i stopped I thanked the cycling gods that it wasn't the front that flatted.

I managed to get home on that rim, 100 wobbly miles
Cyclaholic is offline  
Old 12-04-05, 05:32 PM
  #22  
georgiaboy
Retro-nerd
Thread Starter
 
georgiaboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Morningside - Atlanta
Posts: 1,585

Bikes: 1991 Serotta Colorado II, 1986 Vitus 979, 1971 Juene Classic, 2008 Surly Crosscheck, 1949 Riva Sport

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Cyclaholic
I got my frame ordered in by ABC Bikes in Liverpool. Best price I could find, better than Phantom by about $50.




48-36-26

Just to give you an idea how good the handling is on this frame, I had a pinch flat at 50mph going down a steep descent, on the aerobars, with a weekend touring load in the rear panniers. The road wasn't as smooth as I remembered it I should have only been doing half that speed at most. Anyhow, I did a bit of damage to the rear rim as it bounced through potholes and cracks while slowing down (I'm 220lb, plus maybe 30lb in the panniers) but the handling was solid, never felt like I was about to go down. Once i stopped I thanked the cycling gods that it wasn't the front that flatted.



I managed to get home on that rim, 100 wobbly miles
Amazing story it shows the the LHT is a well-made balanced frame epecially when piloted by the right rider. Value-wise I can't see anything better to use for commuting. Frame material, price, and design are all at the right level for a utilitarian bike used on a daily basis. I had read many posts about the strenth of the frame. I just wasn't sure about the frame being somewhat fun to ride as well.

Spicer Cylcles has the LHT frame for $348.00 in the U.S.

http://parts.spicercycles.com/site/p...and=405&type=T

As far as the crank goes my decision is between a 48-36-26 or a Ritchey compact 50-34

http://aebike.com/site/page.cfm?PageID=30&SKU=CR3253

I am pretty much convinced the LHT is the frame I want.
__________________
Would you like a dream with that?

Last edited by georgiaboy; 12-04-05 at 05:52 PM.
georgiaboy is offline  
Old 12-04-05, 05:53 PM
  #23  
neaolin
Senior Member
 
neaolin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 44
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Treespeed
If you're not doing any loaded touring than I would go with the Surly Pacer instead of the LHT. It's a little easier to "turn it up a notch" with a nice set of road wheels instead of the 26" setup on the LHT. But you still have all the eyelets and clearance you need for racks and fenders when you need them.

My Pacer isn't the lightest setup, but it is a seriously smooth ride and I'm so looking forward to knocking out a century on her this spring.
I agree 100%. I also have a Pacer. I finished a century with the Pacer and I couldn't have been more pleased. The Pacer is the bomb. All hail the Pacer.
neaolin is offline  
Old 12-04-05, 05:59 PM
  #24  
georgiaboy
Retro-nerd
Thread Starter
 
georgiaboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Morningside - Atlanta
Posts: 1,585

Bikes: 1991 Serotta Colorado II, 1986 Vitus 979, 1971 Juene Classic, 2008 Surly Crosscheck, 1949 Riva Sport

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by neaolin
I agree 100%. I also have a Pacer. I finished a century with the Pacer and I couldn't have been more pleased. The Pacer is the bomb. All hail the Pacer.
The Pacer is a great frame. One of my friends has one built up with bullhorns and it's a solid ride. I checked the geometry and I will need a smaller frame. I would prefer a frame that supports 26" wheels.
If I were taller I think my choices would have been between the LHT, Cross Check and the Pacer. If someone was looking for a complete bike for commuting the Crosscheck is an awesome deal.
__________________
Would you like a dream with that?
georgiaboy is offline  
Old 12-04-05, 06:53 PM
  #25  
Bekologist
totally louche
 
Bekologist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: A land that time forgot
Posts: 18,025

Bikes: the ever shifting stable loaded with comfortable road bikes and city and winter bikes

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Alekhine
LHTs are going to save the world.

That is beautiful, Alekhine. Now I know what I'm going to say to all the people who ask what in the heck I'm doing riding my bike way out hinter,

"Just trying to save the world, ma'am."
Bekologist is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.