Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Anyone use a trailer to haul their bikes?

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Anyone use a trailer to haul their bikes?

Old 12-08-05, 05:11 PM
  #1  
AndyGrow
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
AndyGrow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Kodiak, Alaska
Posts: 417
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Anyone use a trailer to haul their bikes?

We have a few bikes in the stable, including a new road tandem. We are trying to figure out what the get to haul them all around...and buying an inexpensive small (4'x8') foldable trailer for about 150 bucks, then adding a few quick-release parts, seem like a good idea.

Anyone done this yet? We are trying to find out what works and what doesn't.

Thanks!
AndyGrow is offline  
Old 12-08-05, 06:59 PM
  #2  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,273

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2405 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 78 Times in 55 Posts
Originally Posted by AndyGrow
We have a few bikes in the stable, including a new road tandem. We are trying to figure out what the get to haul them all around...and buying an inexpensive small (4'x8') foldable trailer for about 150 bucks, then adding a few quick-release parts, seem like a good idea.

Anyone done this yet? We are trying to find out what works and what doesn't.

Thanks!
Yes, I have. The only problem with them is the wheels. Make sure you grease them frequently because there's nothing worse than have to leave your trailer and bikes on the side of the road while you go and get a new axle because the bearings seized up If you can put a larger size tire on it in the first place. A nice 13" works much better than the stock ones. And grease the bearings!

But, over all, a hitch rack works better. Even for a tandem (you might have to take the wheels off the bike). It's easier to park.
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 12-09-05, 08:20 AM
  #3  
Nightshade
Humvee of bikes =Worksman
 
Nightshade's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 5,362
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by AndyGrow
We have a few bikes in the stable, including a new road tandem. We are trying to figure out what the get to haul them all around...and buying an inexpensive small (4'x8') foldable trailer for about 150 bucks, then adding a few quick-release parts, seem like a good idea.

Anyone done this yet? We are trying to find out what works and what doesn't.

Thanks!
These cheapie big box trailers are only good for short haul very light duty once in a while use. They
will not take long all day runs. Trailering your bike can be a very good way to transport them and
some of the other "goodies" that go with day rides. A better quality trailer can be a blessing when
you need real hauling abilties of a truck. So between your car AND a trailer you can do LOTS of jobs.

So yes, trailering your bikes IS a good idea........on a good durable quality trailer.
Nightshade is offline  
Old 12-09-05, 09:30 AM
  #4  
just me
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 88
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The problem with most utility trailers is that fact that they need weight to keep them on the road. Without enough weight the trailer and your bike take a tremendous beating. http://www.sportsrig.com/ trailer meets most of your requirements except inexpensive. I do not have one but if they work as advertised it would be perfect

Jack
just me is offline  
Old 12-09-05, 10:44 AM
  #5  
tom cotter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Cherry Hill,NJ
Posts: 1,173
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
As someone who has lots of trailing experience, the advice to stay away from cheap trailers is rock solid. As is the comment about weight. Look for an enclosed motorcycle carrier type of trailer. These trailers are meant to be driven long distances at highway speeds. Check out Haulmark trailers.

Viable alternative to a trailer might be to consider driving a vehicle that can carry the bikes. Most mini vans eqipped with an after market bicycle load bar can carry several bikes. There are vans that could soak up your tandem and the gas mileage give up isn't as bad as some might think. Crossover vehicles such as the Honda Element really shine in this department. Lastly, a large vehicle such as a full size van or Chevy Suburban will also carry anything you can find to put in them.
tom cotter is offline  
Old 12-09-05, 11:43 AM
  #6  
Padge
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'll second the Suburban as a bike hauler. We can fit mine and my wife's bikes along with 4 kids bikes in the back, simply by removing the 3rd row seat. And even with that, there's room for another bike or two, before having to fold down the 2nd row.

Of course even a used Surburban is going to cost more than a good trailer....
Padge is offline  
Old 12-10-05, 05:22 AM
  #7  
bgrenvil
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: New York
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I use a SPORTSRIG MICOR TRAILER to haul bikes and kayaks. I have used other trailers, but the sportsrig is the best. It folds up for storage. Once you try one you will never look back. The only down side, expensive.

Bill
bgrenvil is offline  
Old 12-10-05, 05:25 AM
  #8  
bgrenvil
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: New York
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
That should have been sportsrig MICRO trailer
bgrenvil is offline  
Old 12-12-05, 11:03 AM
  #9  
Halfstep
married to the bike
 
Halfstep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Grand Ledge
Posts: 95
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Trailering bikes works great, as long as you follow the advice given so far. Definitely spend the money for a nicer trailer and don't pull it without some weight in it. When we bought our trailer, we opted for an open bed design rather than an enclosed trailer. I wanted more versatility.

I believe the utility trailer is the greatest overlooked alternative to the SUV. When I need a half-yard of top soil for the yard, no problem. A yard of mulch for the tree beds, done. All the lumber I need to build a 10x16 shed, go ahead and throw on the shingles, too. I have saved hand over fist on delivery charges and the trailer paid for itself years ago.

We go camping and the inside of the car looks like we're just out for a Sunday drive. Plenty of room for the kids and their "long car ride" stuff. Everything is in the trailer: tent, screen room, rubbermaid totes full of camping gear, tarp, fishing poles and tackle, and the bikes (all four). We did learn to keep the cooler in the car as the trailer does bounce enough to crack eggs even when fully loaded. Stuff we want to make sure is totally and completely dry, we put in the car top carrier which I can put on and take off the car alone, without a ladder.

And, to tie in the "no need for an SUV" issue, we do all this with a Sable station wagon, only 1,600 pounds of towing capacity and every other day of the year I get 20+ mpg. Hold on a sec' let me check . . . yep, still a man, even without a truck.
Halfstep is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.