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Newbie needs rack help....

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Newbie needs rack help....

Old 03-02-06, 11:54 PM
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here and there
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Hey there. After swearing I would fix my old mountain bike the last 3 years, I finally did it and am really glad I did. I've been bitten by the cycling bug!

I'm now doing longer rides and want to start using the bike for running light errands and whatnot. I want to attach a rack but need a little help. On the bottom I have this:

I assume I can attach a rack there, and use p clips or something similar to attach the rack to the seatstays as there are no eyelets on the seatstays.

If I can do so I am thinking of getting this rack https://www.performancebike.com/shop/...tegory_ID=2325

Anybody have any experience with this rack/other recommendations? I'm not planning on carrying much, lunch on longer/family rides and maybe light groceries. Thanks!
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Old 03-03-06, 12:51 AM
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MattP.
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I can't comment on that rack, but I posted almost the same question a while ago. Most people said that most racks actually come w/ p clips to attach to the seatstay. If not, just pick them up at the local hardware store.
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Old 03-03-06, 01:17 PM
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ken cummings
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Looks good to me. That strip of sheet metal down the middle of the rack is an MTB design. Something to keep mud off. The tiny sets of holes near the front of the sheet support some hardware that is not shown.
I suspect marketing types leave it out of this "beauty" shot. The "hardware" is two metal strips that bolt to the rack at those holes and extend forward of the rack body to where they can attach to the frame. I used someting like that for years with heavy bags for commuting in Denver. I have done well with Performance gear. If the two strps are missing it would be easy to make your own.
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Old 03-03-06, 01:53 PM
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No, no, no! What you need is nothing less than the Jandd Expedition rack:
https://www.jandd.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=FREXP
I bought one for my mountain bike and love it. On standard racks your heels will hit your basket or pannier and annoy you. This rack has extra length to slide the load back. It is worth the price. I got mine from Performance, but neither they nor BikeNashbar seem to have them anymore.

I paired it with the mesh fabric pannier/basket to carry groceries:
https://www.jandd.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=FGBP
or
https://www.jandd.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=FCHGP
and the oyster bucket is always fun:
https://www.cobbworks.com/

Carried a 25 pound bookbag in one basket and a sack of groceries in the other. No more sweaty back and aching wrists!

-Clay
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Old 03-03-06, 03:28 PM
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Don't have H&T spending too much money, Oxy. After all, this is an old dept store bike. That Jandd rack costs more than the bike did new and is way beefier than the job requires. Yes, the TransIt rack will have the hardware needed to attach it to the seat stays. You may need to get the eyelets on your dropouts tapped, but don't worry about that unless you know for sure.
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Old 03-03-06, 04:11 PM
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here and there
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Originally Posted by BlazingPedals
Don't have H&T spending too much money, Oxy. After all, this is an old dept store bike. That Jandd rack costs more than the bike did new and is way beefier than the job requires. Yes, the TransIt rack will have the hardware needed to attach it to the seat stays. You may need to get the eyelets on your dropouts tapped, but don't worry about that unless you know for sure.
Those Jandd racks are way too expensive...and yes, they do cost more than what the old beater bike cost back in the mid-90s. I can't complain though, the bike has held up well and is comfortable.

Thanks for the info everyone.

Last edited by here and there; 03-03-06 at 04:30 PM.
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Old 03-04-06, 05:28 AM
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From the look of the bike, the chainstays are tacked onto the rear dropouts. It will do for commuting but there is no need to spend a fortune on racks.
I use a cheap copy of a Blackburn rack (with 3 legs) and it works as well as the genuine article for commuter loads. The key feature is that the rearmost set of legs are angled inwards at an angle for enhanced stiffness. Some racks have a solid top plate to deflect mud. If you already have fenders, avoid these as they interfere with securing over-sized loads. You can strap all kinds of things to the top of a rack with bunji cords.
The issue of heel interference can be avoided if your panniers have an angled heel cutout rather than a square profile from the side.
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Old 03-04-06, 05:37 AM
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It doesn't look like your dropout eyes are threaded so you'll have to use thru-bolts. Use flat headed bolts to avoid interference with your chain on the smallest cog. Run the bolts through from the inside (you'll probably have to remove your rear wheel) when you mount the rack. Be sure to use either nylock nuts or locktite so the nuts won't vibrate off.
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