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Looking for a bike...no idea where to start!

Old 04-09-06, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Digital Gee
I have to respectfully disagree. Less efficiency does not equal less comfortable, at least to me. I returned to cycling last year on a Trek 3900 MTB, a touch over $300. Yes, I was slower than the road bikes out there, but that wasn't important to me. I didn't have to lean way over, my back and neck didn't hurt, and I liked being able to squeeze the brakes easily.

A few months later I replaced the knobbie tires with slicks and got more efficient. Still not like a road bike, but still FAR more comfortable. I've since migrated to a hybrid with road tires, and I'm a lot faster, but still probably no competition for a road biker.

But that's not the point. Sounds like she wants to get from Point A to Point B with comfort, and suggesting a road bike as the best solution seems to be overkill, at least to me. The bike that feels right is the one she'll ride, and when she gets really into it, IF she gets really into it, she can upgrade to a different bike.

I now own five bikes in less than ten months. Other than the Trek, all used. My total investment has been under $750. I now have the knowledge to choose my next bike(s) that I didn't have before.
I agree. But I also warned her away from road bikes (racers). I think some of the suggestions above regarding hybrids, with 700c wheels but a more comfortable riding position, would be the best bet for a newbie. Long-term, the best bets would be along the lines of the Novara touring bike one poster suggested, or perhaps a cyclocross bike.
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Old 04-09-06, 09:27 PM
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You don't need and probably don't want a mountain or road bike. A hybrid is still suboptimal as well.

Road bikes are too aggressive and too hard to fit for someone new who doesn't need to go fast. MTB bikes have unnecessary suspension, heavy frames and knobby tires making them sluggish for city riding. Hybrids often combine the worst of both worlds. So, what to do?

1) Find a used Raleigh three-speed and get it tuned up.
2) Dahon folder. Very practical, go anywhere city bikes at reasonable prices. Models with internally geared hubs are very low maintenance.
3) Despite their reputation for Italian racing bikes, Bianchi has several well-designed bikes for city and commuting at different price ranges. The Boardwalk, the Bergamo and Castro Valley would be worth considering.
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Old 04-09-06, 09:34 PM
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Wow, daniel haden...do you work for those guys? That was a hell of a sales pitch...you almost had me, too!
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Old 04-09-06, 09:36 PM
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I'm not even saying she gets an MTB, in fact, the opposite.

+1 vote for the Raleigh 3-speed type bicycle. Basically, just tell your LBS that you want a "Dutch" utility bike if you decide to go this route.
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Old 04-09-06, 09:52 PM
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Whatever you get, if you do it right and love it, you'll end up like a large number of the people on this board; you'll have a couple or more bikes representing a wide spectrum of styles.

Which, in the end, shows that not only are we indecisive for you, we are for ourselves as well!

I started with one bike that was perfect, and then ended up with a different bike that was (is) perfect.
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Old 04-09-06, 09:53 PM
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By the by, have you been tallying the number of inputs yet? At this point it may be good to start sorting by category.
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Old 04-10-06, 10:56 AM
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Wow! This is a lot of input. For what its worth, I had a Bridgestone road bike from the 80's. I stopped riding bike for the past 15 years. For 2 years I had a wally world brand bike (Murry). I was able to tune fairly good, but if you are serious at all about riding - stay away. Going from a good bike, down to wally world brand, was horrible. At any rate I have been shooping for a good bike for DW and myself. Any bike thats priced around $300 will be a Cadillac compaired to department store brands.

I am surprised that some people think the hybrids are not a good choice, but if you would have asked me 15 years ago (if hybrids Existed) I would have agreed. Back then I would have never bought anything but a road bike. Now that I am older, I think the hybrid is a resonable choice for around town recreational biking.

Good luck on your choices
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Old 04-10-06, 04:35 PM
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Originally Posted by TWMiller

I am surprised that some people think the hybrids are not a good choice, but if you would have asked me 15 years ago (if hybrids Existed) I would have agreed. Back then I would have never bought anything but a road bike. Now that I am older, I think the hybrid is a resonable choice for around town recreational biking.
There are basically two types of hybrids. There are those that are more road inspired and those that are more ATB inspired.

The ATB inspired ones tend to have superfluous springs and fatter tires than are usually necessary on roads and paved trails. Furthermore, to cover the cost of the suspension, the other components have to be downgraded to reach a given price point. The kicker is that you then have more mechanical components to maintain.

The road styled hybrids tend to have a more stretched out riding position which is probably not ideal for a new leisure cyclist.

Both also tend to have flat bars which I also think are a poor comprimise, especially on the road style hybrids. The hand position can be hard on the wrists over any distance. Bars with more of a back sweep get the hands closer to a neutral position. I also would like to see more of these bikes built with internally geared hubs rather than derailleured drivetrains.

So, IMO, the ultimate commuter/urban/leisure bike would have a lightweight frame, a handful of useful gears, appropriate tires and wheels, reasonable geometry, room for fenders and mounts for racks.
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Old 04-10-06, 06:28 PM
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Even better would be to include racks and fenders together with the bike. Cheaper in the long run for the commuter, and will result in more actual utility usage from the casual rider. You also have to overcome this percieved notion that fenders are well, "gae" to put it simply.
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Old 04-11-06, 07:56 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by halfspeed
A hybrid is still suboptimal as well.

Hybrids often combine the worst of both worlds. So, what to do?
Like someone else said, 12 responses, 10 opinions. Here's the 11th:

I think that the performance (road bike based) hybrids combine the BEST of both worlds. As an example the Norco I purchased has 28mm tires, not razor blade thin but quick enough for me. It has a flat handlebar, so I'm not hunched over and have access to the brakes at all times. My back and neck don't hurt from looking up all the time - this is a big plus for a beginner as why would someone ride a bike that makes their neck hurt?

I do however think that the mtn bike based hybrids are a waste. The suspension forks on them are worthless, yet add quite a bit of weight to the bike. The seat posts are quite heavy as they have a built in suspension system as well and the tires are usually quite wide (35mm). HOWEVER if you're not interested in speed and can get somewhere 2 minutes later than you would on a faster bike this might be the way to go. If you want to simplify things a good LBS will remove the suspension fork for you and replace it with a rigid one and they should give you some credit for it as well

Good luck out there.

Oh, and it's not important WHAT you ride. It's important THAT you ride.

-W.
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Old 04-11-06, 09:45 AM
  #36  
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My wife is also 5'8" and very heavy. She rides with me on the recument saddle on our Counterpoint tandem. She is too "full-figured" to be comfortable even on her old mountain bike. If mobility and flexibility is a bit of an issue find a mixte or ladies framed mountain bike, one where you can step through the frame between the seat and handlebars to get on the bike. Do NOT get one of those extra-wide saddles that look like a tractor seat. I would look for something in the $300 to $600 range as a starter bike. If you like cycling you will know when/if you want to up-grade.
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Old 05-07-13, 08:19 PM
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Holy options and opinions Batman! You all are awesome and helpful and I am an ungrateful wench.

When I posted this I had every intention of going out the next month and buying a bike. This did not happen.

Life, three moves, two states, a divorce and a degree later...NOW I'm back to where I started this post.

This past weekend I went riding with some friends on a rented bike and remembered..Oh yes..THIS...I wanted to start doing THIS again.

I hate to even ask after all your well thought out and timely opinions last time...but most of what was already suggested is no longer currently available...

I do have a few more opinions of my own than I came in with last time, so hopefully I won't waste too much of your time this go round, tho reading through the debate from last time I did learn a lot.

I am absolutely aware that 6 months from now when I've settled into riding regularly and want to have a faster commute I will end up buying a new more efficient bike. I'm ok with that. What I want to start with is more the dutch utility / comfortable upright type bike. I am more likely to enjoy that right away and stay with it, then as I adjust I can move into the more forward leaning traditional bike. I hope that makes sense.

SO, for *that* type of bike...do I hear any suggestions?

-Raina
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Old 05-07-13, 08:54 PM
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Yes, Raina!

I have several recommendations for you. They are as follows:

1) www.astreetbikenameddesire.com/pashley_princess_sovereign.html
2) www.astreetbikenameddesire.com/work_cycles_omafiets.html
3) www.bikesdirect.com/products/mercier/elle_city.htm
4)www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/bikes/model/via.2.w/11532/55932/
5)https://www.raleighusa.com/bikes/stee...bman-mixte-13/

You might also enjoy this:

https://lovelybike.blogspot.com/2010/...ella-ciao.html

Last edited by Cfiber; 05-07-13 at 09:06 PM.
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Old 05-08-13, 01:48 PM
  #39  
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You know, you've come to experienced people to gain from their wisdom. That's a good approach.

Why not ask among your circle of contacts if there's someone local to you who is somewhat expert or "fanatical" about bike riding? A few names and networking skills will gain you a "buddY" to go with you on those first few bike shop visits. Finding someone who's your gender can also help to understand certain, um, anatomical concerns that you might have once you begin test riding.

Have at it!
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Old 05-08-13, 05:45 PM
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Thank you!

Why exactly #3 so much cheaper than the others?

It makes sense to me to buy something cheaper if I am likely to upgrade in a few months anyway, but I don't want to regret that choice...

These are all LOVELY btw.

I'm usually fairly close to the opposite of girly...but I opened the second one and went...it's just so..PRETTY...
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Old 05-08-13, 07:08 PM
  #41  
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It's important to consider the kind of landscape upon which you'll be riding. If you live in a mountainous area, you will probably want a pretty light bike and lots of speeds. A single-speed bike would be a nightmare for a beginning rider in a mountainous region, especially if it's heavy.

If you live in a flat area with lots of level ground, then having a lot of speeds isn't as important and a heavier bike won't be so bad. Dutch-style utility bikes are generally very heavy, but Holland is pretty flat.

As lovely as many of the bikes Cfiber recommended are, some of them are incredibly heavy (65 pounds is VERY heavy for a bicycle) and pretty expensive.
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Old 05-08-13, 07:19 PM
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Considered a chat with the nice folks at a proper bike shop? show-tell & testrides can be informative..
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Old 05-08-13, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by ralph12
It's important to consider the kind of landscape upon which you'll be riding. If you live in a mountainous area, you will probably want a pretty light bike and lots of speeds. A single-speed bike would be a nightmare for a beginning rider in a mountainous region, especially if it's heavy.

If you live in a flat area with lots of level ground, then having a lot of speeds isn't as important and a heavier bike won't be so bad. Dutch-style utility bikes are generally very heavy, but Holland is pretty flat.

As lovely as many of the bikes Cfiber recommended are, some of them are incredibly heavy (65 pounds is VERY heavy for a bicycle) and pretty expensive.
+1

This is quite true. If you have serious hills or inclines to climb, you might wanna pass on the traditional "Dutch bike". Many of them have internal gear hubs, chainguards, skirtguards, racks, and fenders. By the time you add lights, reflectors, and a bell, you're up to fifty pounds or more.

OTOH, if you don't have any really challenging hills and you're mostly on flat terrain, then the Omafiet Dutch styled bikes will work just fine, if you really like 'em. Of course, the Giant Via 2 W is an exception to the traditional Dutch Omafiet, in that it weighs much less.

* You don't wanna carry a heavy bike up any stairs either...
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Old 05-08-13, 08:18 PM
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Before you start shopping for a bike, shop for a bike shop. There's more differences among bike shops than there is among the various bike brands. Who will you feel comfortable servicing your new bike? Who do you want working for you if you have a warranty issue? Who do you trust to advise you about accessories and such?

Visit as many bike shops that are convenient to your home as you can. Tell them what you just told us. When you find the one that asks the kind of questions that show they understand YOU, that's it. Buy a model they carry in a price range that you can afford and you'll never go wrong.
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Old 05-08-13, 08:20 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob
Considered a chat with the nice folks at a proper bike shop? show-tell & testrides can be informative..

Honestly I have an aversion to punchlines.

The joke starts like this "So a fat girl walks into a bike shop"

It's ridiculous and counter productive, but there it is.

--

As far as Flat/Hills go, I'm in Salt Lake for the next 3 months and then back in PDX, so honestly flat is pretty much standard. Tho 65lbs to lift it up onto the hook on the Max / up the stairs is more than I'm looking for.

I like the look of the Giant Via 2 quite a bit. Alternately how does anyone feel about the Novora Mia or Jaunt bikes at REI, the C-7 from publicbikes or the T300 from Torker?
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Old 05-08-13, 08:35 PM
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Originally Posted by JustRaina
The joke starts like this "So a fat girl walks into a bike shop"

It's ridiculous and counter productive, but there it is. i
My point exactly.

There really are bike shops that understand that they earn their money by making you happy. Try to find one of those.

No internet supplier is going to be very good at helping you to get the fit right.
No internet supplier is going to know the local conditions where you're going to be riding and what kind of bike will suit you best.
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Old 05-08-13, 10:29 PM
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This is a big one: What's the weather like, and how flat is where you live? What condition are the roads in?

Also, you might stop a few people at bike racks in your area and ask for their advice on what they recommend for the neighborhood.
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Old 05-08-13, 11:20 PM
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Originally Posted by JustRaina
Honestly I have an aversion to punchlines.

The joke starts like this "So a fat girl walks into a bike shop"

It's ridiculous and counter productive, but there it is.

--

As far as Flat/Hills go, I'm in Salt Lake for the next 3 months and then back in PDX, so honestly flat is pretty much standard. Tho 65lbs to lift it up onto the hook on the Max / up the stairs is more than I'm looking for.

I like the look of the Giant Via 2 quite a bit. Alternately how does anyone feel about the Novora Mia or Jaunt bikes at REI, the C-7 from publicbikes or the T300 from Torker?
Both REI bikes are really low tiered bikes. The C-7 is made of hi-tensile steel not chromoly. The Torker website seems to be reluctant to give too much spec info on the T300.

* Hi-tensile steel is not as strong as chromoly and tubes generally run thicker. Thicker means more weight for you to carry.

IMHO your best bet would be one of the following:

1) The Giant Via 2 W
local bike shop
2) The Schwinn City Bike IG8
www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_557421_-1__202396
3) The Schwinn City Bike IG3
www.rei.com/product/854939/schwinn-city-ig3-bike-2012-closeout
4) Windsor-Oxford City Town Bike
www.bikesdirect.com/products/windsor/oxford.htm

If you order from Nashbar, make sure that you talk to customer service about frame size, before you order. Try to let them tell you what size to order.

1 & 2 should perform better than 3 & 4. However, 3 is the best cash value deal at 50% the MSRP. 2 is just about 60% the MSRP.

3 is the male's Schwinn City IG3 model...

Last edited by Cfiber; 05-09-13 at 09:18 AM.
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Old 05-09-13, 08:08 PM
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Okok...so bike shop shopping today after work.

The problem I have is that the LBSs I went to were all brand specific...meaning of course each pointed me towards their brand's version of what they thought I wanted.

So now I bring it to you.

One sold Specialized, and suggested the Expedition Sport LE
The next sold Trek and suggested the Verve
The third sold Giant and suggested the Via 2 or the Cypress DX

How do they stack up quality wise? I know the Cypress was aluminium vs steel on the via, how much does that matter? Meep!

(You're all lovely, thank you)
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Old 05-10-13, 01:02 AM
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Originally Posted by JustRaina
Okok...so bike shop shopping today after work.

The problem I have is that the LBSs I went to were all brand specific...meaning of course each pointed me towards their brand's version of what they thought I wanted.

So now I bring it to you.

One sold Specialized, and suggested the Expedition Sport LE
The next sold Trek and suggested the Verve
The third sold Giant and suggested the Via 2 or the Cypress DX

How do they stack up quality wise? I know the Cypress was aluminium vs steel on the via, how much does that matter? Meep!

(You're all lovely, thank you)
Most of your short list consists of lower tiered hybrid with inexpensive suspended forks. Stock suspension forks installed on entry level hybrid bikes are usually not worthwhile. You'd be better off with just a nice set of tires. Suspended forks absorb forward energy, thus slowing you down. Therefore, IMO, rigid forks are best!

That said, the Via 2 W wins hands down!
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