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Need Advice on Clip in shoes and pedals!

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Need Advice on Clip in shoes and pedals!

Old 07-28-06, 11:39 AM
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PossumPower
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Need Advice on Clip in shoes and pedals!

Dear Folks,
I am new to cycling and recently got clip in pedals and shoes. I am been rather successful at clippig in and out on my right side but have had a much harder time on the left. Does anyone have any advice? I could use any and all I can get about how to clip in and out faster, safter ect. I could also use advice on how to fall so I don't hurt myself if I can't clip out in time (just in case, ya know). Anything would be much appreciated.
Sincerly,
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Old 07-28-06, 11:43 AM
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Just twist your foot, it should pop right out. If its too tight, check to see if its adjustable and adjust.
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Old 07-28-06, 02:22 PM
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gear
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everyone worries about unclipping but clipping in is more of an issue especially with some types of cleats; spd cleats for instance are small so they tend to be harder to clip in till you get used to them. I'm a total clutz but in the nine years that I've been using clipless, Ive never fallen because I couldn't get my shoe unclipped. you should begin changing your pedaling from push-push to a constant whirlit will get more muscles involved and make it easier to ride longer distances, you also might want to shift down to a gear that seems too easy and then pedal much faster.
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Old 07-28-06, 02:23 PM
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I meant whirl not whirlit
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Old 07-29-06, 07:28 AM
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Advice: Adjust the clip tension on the pedal. Also check cleat alignment on the shoe.

Advice: Fall off. You will eventually, so think about it and practice it. When you go over from unability to unclip, you will have little or no forward motion. So to practice, just get on your bike in some nice soft grass and fall over. Don't try to catch yourself with your hand or elbow - that way lies broken bones. Don't try to protect your head. Try a variation of the tuck-and-roll where with your arm at your side you pull in your shoulder and impact behind the point of the shoulder. The arm will take a lot of the impact. You should hit with the shoulder/arm and hip at the same time. Head will quickly follow so wear a helmet. The idea is to spread the impact so no one spot gets hurt. I've fallen off several times from not being able to unclip, but the worst I've gotten is a scraped knee.
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Old 07-29-06, 07:45 AM
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I would not advise an adult newbie cyclist to use clipless pedals.
Many older clipless fans were experienced and skilled riders when they converted to clipless.
Young riders have often been riding BMX or whatever for many years before starting clipless in their mid teens. They are quick to learn and hard to hurt.

Adult newbie riders do not have an "autopilot" to take control of the bike when something unexpected happens, that is why they come off more than other riders. I find that even with my 40yrs experience my brain can only cope with 3 simultaneous hazards before taking a rare fall.

Make sure that you are skilled enough to hold a track stand, ride very slowly, and make an emergency brake without coming off the bike.
The best way to take a fall is to keep your hands on the bars and take the impact with your upper arm, rolling onto your back. The most dangerous part of this is avoiding cars and curbs. A skilled rider would try to select a safe runout for a crash but you need your brain working overtime to consider this.
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Old 07-29-06, 07:51 AM
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Originally Posted by MichaelW
I would not advise an adult newbie cyclist to use clipless pedals.
I have to agree. Get comfortable with the bike, shifting, braking, etc. It's ok to put the shoes and pedals on the shelf until then. After you've been riding a while, then consider clipless.

Since you've already made the plunge, what shoes and pedals do you have?
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Old 07-31-06, 01:46 PM
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Doin' good!

I have purchased shimano pedels and specialized ladies Taho mountain bike shoes. Since I posted this I have been practicing with much success. I went out into a field and road around for several hours. I fell lots of times. Then I went into a deserted parking lot and road some more. Since then I been on two 20 mile rides without falling at all. I have taken your advice though and I am going to practice falling onto my arm to distribute the wieght. But so far so good!
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Old 07-31-06, 01:55 PM
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My right foot is always easier to unclip than my left. Most riders have dominant leg that the put down when unclipping at a stop. I think you may just be experiencing that. Good on you for getting a little practice with the left, though. The only time I almost went over on my clipless shoes is when (for whatever reason), I leaned left rather than right at a stop. I had a near panic fall when i couldn't get my left foot out.
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Old 08-02-06, 10:02 PM
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I have experienced exactly what you are talking about. But I am trying to train myself to unclip and lean to the left because my derailer is on the right. But for now it will continue to be the right side until I get more dexterity.
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Old 08-03-06, 06:03 AM
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I went with Shimano shoes and Performance Campus pedals (SPD). I love the combo. Even on a cheapo comfort bike, they made a huge improvement in my riding. I went for about 3 months of riding after a 15 hiatus from the bike before I got mine. I love them. Clipping in and out is not a problem at all. Just takes a little practice.
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Old 08-03-06, 06:14 AM
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While learning to clip out on your left side is important, it would be immensely helpful to also learn how to trackstand.

Reduce cleat wear, look cool and pick up chicks.
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