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Anybody ever chop a B72 Brooks Saddle?

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Anybody ever chop a B72 Brooks Saddle?

Old 11-01-06, 12:50 PM
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Anybody ever chop a B72 Brooks Saddle?

Anyone, anyone? I have a B72 Brooks saddle which is humongous and heavy. But then again so I my rear end, hence the saddle. I have seen tons of B17s chopped, split, laced etc...but never one of the wider saddles. I just can't tell if chopping it will ruin it. I don't want it to become a saggy mess.

It is just getting to be so broken in and I don't want to ruin this one and have to start over with a new saddle. The reason for the chopping desire is to remove the skirt which occasionally presses into my legs when I am in the drops on or the aerobars, asthetics, and weight.

http://www.wallbike.com/B66B72.html
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Old 11-01-06, 04:12 PM
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Originally Posted by slowandsteady
Anyone, anyone? I have a B72 Brooks saddle which is humongous and heavy. But then again so I my rear end, hence the saddle. I have seen tons of B17s chopped, split, laced etc...but never one of the wider saddles. I just can't tell if chopping it will ruin it. I don't want it to become a saggy mess.

It is just getting to be so broken in and I don't want to ruin this one and have to start over with a new saddle. The reason for the chopping desire is to remove the skirt which occasionally presses into my legs when I am in the drops on or the aerobars, asthetics, and weight.
Don't muck with a good B72!! Dump the drops instead! All that "chopped, split, laced etc..." B17 asthetics baloney is for those who can't get enough OCP through carbon fixes.

Worn and still good after 35 years.
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Old 11-02-06, 07:51 AM
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Actually, I'd like to see one chopped. Sounds cool.
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Old 11-02-06, 11:47 AM
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IMO, you have the wrong saddle for your riding style and setup. They are for 3-speeds, and other setups that imitate 3-speeds. I agree with I-Like-To-Bike, don't ruin a good B72. If you insist on going ahead as an experiment, you will likely find that the wider/flatter cross section of the 72 will not support you once the skirts are removed.

B17's are much narrower and have a fairly high arch in the cross section which tends to add stiffness. However, for most applications, given the limited time spent in the drops, I wouldn't slice up a good 17 either. If you ride in the drops alot, you may consider a Pro. They are a race type with lots of thigh clearance. Very thick leather and will support a rider of medium weight fairly well after trimming.
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Old 11-02-06, 12:55 PM
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IMO, you have the wrong saddle for your riding style and setup.
Well this is my dilema. I would have loved to stay with my B17 or other narrow saddle suited for road biking. But alas I am a woman with birthing hips and even on my B17 I suffered a tail bone soft tissue area injury that was just excrutiating. It was because my pelvis was too wide for the saddle and because my one sit bone was not supported by the saddle I basically sprained that part of rear end. It actually started before the B17 on an even narrower cut out saddle. I was hoping the B17 would be wide enough, but my tail bone area never healed. And this was a pain that I don't care to ever experience again.

Even the B72 is just barely wide enough. My tail bone area has since healed about 80% with this saddle. The B72 is by far the widest saddle I can find, unless you count those god awful gel monstrocities.

The B72 is extremely comfortable, it just isn't perfect. Hence my desire to chop, but I most likely won't touch it.
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Old 11-02-06, 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by slowandsteady
Well this is my dilema. I would have loved to stay with my B17 or other narrow saddle suited for road biking. But alas I am a woman with birthing hips and even on my B17 I suffered a tail bone soft tissue area injury that was just excrutiating. It was because my pelvis was too wide for the saddle and because my one sit bone was not supported by the saddle I basically sprained that part of rear end. It actually started before the B17 on an even narrower cut out saddle. I was hoping the B17 would be wide enough, but my tail bone area never healed. And this was a pain that I don't care to ever experience again.

Even the B72 is just barely wide enough. My tail bone area has since healed about 80% with this saddle. The B72 is by far the widest saddle I can find, unless you count those god awful gel monstrocities.

The B72 is extremely comfortable, it just isn't perfect. Hence my desire to chop, but I most likely won't touch it.
Maybe it the solution to your problem does not involve the saddle as much as your cycling posture.The width and weight of the saddle may be irrelevant in your case except for self image.

I'd still recommend that you reconsider riding in the drops, unless the "efficiency" is so important that it over rides the associated pain and discomfort for you.
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Old 11-02-06, 02:40 PM
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Maybe it the solution to your problem does not involve the saddle as much as your cycling posture.The width and weight of the saddle may be irrelevant in your case except for self image.

I'd still recommend that you reconsider riding in the drops, unless the "efficiency" is so important that it over rides the associated pain and discomfort for you.
Well, I actually changed out my stem from a 6 degree to a 40 degree stem. So my posture is pretty darn upright for a road bike. I typically use the hoods, but since losing some weight having gone to riding in the drops sometimes. It is mostly for a change in hand position or for fighting a headwind which is common around here, especially in winter time. I also use aerobars for the same reason. I gain a good 2-3 mph on the aerobars.

Since the saddle has gotten to be much softer with the breaking in period it is bothering me less and less. I mostly noticed the problem when I only had the saddle for two weeks before embarking on a 159 mile ride over two days! Mostly I was just curious to see if anyone else had done it and what the results were. There is no way I will chop it without seeing other success stories.
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Old 11-02-06, 02:43 PM
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Again, I agree with I-Like-To-Bike. I also have some understanding of the sitbone width issue. That's why I almost always ride on a B67, which is very similar to your 72, except with springs. I suggest changing the setup to match your saddle, if you like it. Go more upright by changing the bars/height.

I think drops are over-rated except for racing or very fast club riders. As far as I'm concerned, I could cut the hooks off and never miss 'em. Caveat: Unless they can be raised high enough that the drop section clears the top tube on the frame. I usually choose one of my bikes with NorthRoad bars. Like a 3-speed. Remember those? Probably the most comfortable design ever to fall victim to 'style marketing.' There are perhaps billions out there. I keep the grips about even with the saddle height.

There's a reason for the boom in hybrid, comfort bikes and less-than-race road bikes. In other words, designs having in mind the fact that cyclists are older, with all that entails as far as physical issues, and have money - just like in other market niches.
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Old 11-02-06, 02:49 PM
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Originally Posted by slowandsteady
Well, I actually changed out my stem from a 6 degree to a 40 degree stem. So my posture is pretty darn upright for a road bike. I typically use the hoods, but since losing some weight having gone to riding in the drops sometimes. It is mostly for a change in hand position or for fighting a headwind which is common around here, especially in winter time. I also use aerobars for the same reason. I gain a good 2-3 mph on the aerobars.

Since the saddle has gotten to be much softer with the breaking in period it is bothering me less and less. I mostly noticed the problem when I only had the saddle for two weeks before embarking on a 159 mile ride over two days! Mostly I was just curious to see if anyone else had done it and what the results were. There is no way I will chop it without seeing other success stories.
Ahhh... I see. I was typing my last as you were posting yours. Well, that stem should help. It's what I might try if I was intent on keeping the drop bars. In fact, I have a Sequoia that I modified in a similar fashion, but it has a B17 that seems to work fine. Your saddle should continue to improve, too. Don't 'condition' it in an attempt to hurry things along, just ride it.
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Old 11-02-06, 06:03 PM
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Originally Posted by slowandsteady
Even the B72 is just barely wide enough. My tail bone area has since healed about 80% with this saddle. The B72 is by far the widest saddle I can find, unless you count those god awful gel monstrocities.

The B72 is extremely comfortable, it just isn't perfect. Hence my desire to chop, but I most likely won't touch it.
The B33 is the widest they make (about an inch wider than the 72). It's intended for upright riding though and has large skirts. It would be a unique looking chop job.
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Old 11-03-06, 04:09 AM
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If the only issue you have with the saddle is chaffing, then try lacing. It will pull the skirts in a bit and hopefully eliminate all the chaffing. Good luck

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Old 11-03-06, 08:26 AM
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Originally Posted by AllenG
The B33 is the widest they make (about an inch wider than the 72). It's intended for upright riding though and has large skirts. It would be a unique looking chop job.
Oh god, the B33 just awful looking. Where the heck are people riding where they need that many springs??? That thing is practically a mattress.

http://www.wallbike.com/B33.html
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Old 11-03-06, 08:35 AM
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Originally Posted by slowandsteady
Oh god, the B33 just awful looking. Where the heck are people riding where they need that many springs???
Originally cobblestones. Actually, quite a few riders of 'sit-up-&-beg' bikes like the look of springs under their saddles (different strokes, etc), rather than for practical reasons. I understand that Brooks sell lots to the Dutch, Germans and Italians...
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Old 11-03-06, 08:35 AM
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Originally Posted by slowandsteady
Oh god, the B33 just awful looking. Where the heck are people riding where they need that many springs??? That thing is practically a mattress.

http://www.wallbike.com/B33.html
Believe it or not, some people prefer comfort over speed.
How's the sore butt? Still more concerned about OCP-approved aesthetics?
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Old 11-05-06, 11:34 PM
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Originally Posted by slowandsteady
Oh god, the B33 just awful looking. Where the heck are people riding where they need that many springs??? That thing is practically a mattress.

http://www.wallbike.com/B33.html
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I see the B33 as a beautifully made tool. But, it is definitely not a supple riding saddle. Those springs are very stiff and made to last a life time in the third world. A B73 is the most luxurious of the Brooks saddles as far as ride quality goes. It has about the same top as the B72.

And, I agree with the other poster on lacing the saddle to bring the skirts in if you are chafing, a rare problem with Brooks saddles. Chafing (a reddening of the contact area due to rubbing while moistened with sweat), when using a Brooks, is more usually associated with improper clothing or an out-of-adjustment of the saddle/bike fit. Rather, hide leather is noted for curing chafing problems.
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Old 11-06-06, 10:42 AM
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Believe it or not, some people prefer comfort over speed.
How's the sore butt? Still more concerned about OCP-approved aesthetics?

Hah! If you saw my bike you would be quite sure that I do not suffer from OCP! From the massive frame pump to the high rise stem(40 degrees baby!), to the flashlights strapped to the handlebars, to the one water bottle that doesn't quite fit right, to the yellow saddle bag on a blue bike, to the mismatched tires, and the MTB pedals on a road bike, a big round mirror, pepper spray held on by velcro, and of course the dork disk, it is an anti-OCP machine!!! Then of course, there is how I look....

The sore butt(tail bone) has nothing to do with OCP. And having 45 springs under my rear would have done nothing to prevent or cure an injury that had to do with using a too narrow saddle(a women's model) when I didn't know just how wide my ischial tuberoscities were. My previous riding had been on a MTB where I just didn't sit nearly as much as I do on my road bike, so for the first 33 years of my life, it was not an issue. I had no reason to believe it would be an issue on the road.


I am all about comfort. And my speeds are not very speedy. I ride on some nasty roads and at no point was I ever thinking I would need THAT many springs or any springs for that matter. And unless you ride on cobble stones bolt upright, I see no need for a B33. But hey that's just me. If you have a B33, and enjoy it, I think that's great.
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Old 11-06-06, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by jcm
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I see the B33 as a beautifully made tool. But, it is definitely not a supple riding saddle. Those springs are very stiff and made to last a life time in the third world. A B73 is the most luxurious of the Brooks saddles as far as ride quality goes. It has about the same top as the B72.

And, I agree with the other poster on lacing the saddle to bring the skirts in if you are chafing, a rare problem with Brooks saddles. Chafing (a reddening of the contact area due to rubbing while moistened with sweat), when using a Brooks, is more usually associated with improper clothing or an out-of-adjustment of the saddle/bike fit. Rather, hide leather is noted for curing chafing problems.
Actually the B33 is a very supple ride. The springs look like they belong on farm equipment but they have noticeably more give than the single springs on my B66. You can feel the B33 rock underneath as one pedals. A full suspension saddle.



--A

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Old 11-06-06, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by slowandsteady
I am all about comfort. And my speeds are not very speedy. I ride on some nasty roads and at no point was I ever thinking I would need THAT many springs or any springs for that matter. And unless you ride on cobble stones bolt upright, I see no need for a B33. But hey that's just me. If you have a B33, and enjoy it, I think that's great.
Actually, I'm a B66, B72, B73 type of guy who does ride bolt upright. Dang comfortable too!
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Old 11-06-06, 01:09 PM
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Originally Posted by AllenG
Actually the B33 is a very supple ride. The springs look like they belong on farm equipment but they have noticeably more give than the single springs on my B66. You can feel the B33 rock underneath as one pedals. A full suspension saddle.



--A
I agree that the B33 rides softer than a B66/67. But I think it has to do with the larger top mostly. I have two 67's and they are sprung pretty stiff. I replaced the springs with B73 rear coils. These are .084" while the 66/67 coils are .092". Only .008" difference but alot more supple with no real discernable rocking. Mo betta on long rides.

The one B33 I rode on was incredibly rigid, but still very comfortable. I would definitely use it on a Farm-All
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Old 11-06-06, 02:33 PM
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Originally Posted by jcm
I agree that the B33 rides softer than a B66/67. But I think it has to do with the larger top mostly. I have two 67's and they are sprung pretty stiff. I replaced the springs with B73 rear coils. These are .084" while the 66/67 coils are .092". Only .008" difference but alot more supple with no real discernable rocking. Mo betta on long rides.

The one B33 I rode on was incredibly rigid, but still very comfortable. I would definitely use it on a Farm-All

One thing I noticed immediately with my B72 is that the leather was much harder than that on my B17. It looks like the same thickness, but it took much longer to break in and was like a rock in the beginning. The springs on the B72 do nothing. But that is fine with me. The leather itself has suspension properties that plastic saddles do not. I like to spin at 90-110 rpms so having a bunch of soft springs would be kind of annoying. I really wish I could use my B17(actually I have it on my MTB). It is like wearing an expensive leather glove. You completely forget about it. Truly wonderful.
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Old 11-08-06, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by slowandsteady
One thing I noticed immediately with my B72 is that the leather was much harder than that on my B17. It looks like the same thickness, but it took much longer to break in and was like a rock in the beginning. The springs on the B72 do nothing. But that is fine with me. The leather itself has suspension properties that plastic saddles do not. I like to spin at 90-110 rpms so having a bunch of soft springs would be kind of annoying. I really wish I could use my B17(actually I have it on my MTB). It is like wearing an expensive leather glove. You completely forget about it. Truly wonderful.
Trust me. The coils on a B66/67 are not soft and do not rob spinning effort. Since you are a woman, I assume you weigh significantly less that me - at 230lbs. There is no discernable rocking with stock 66 springs. You will only feel them working over the roughest road shock. We ain't talkin' Huffy here.

I'm surprised that you found the 72 to be harder than the 17 to break-in. The wider/flatter seat area of the 72 should have provided more 'give' right from the start - just like my 67's. Whereas the 17's are arched down the spine, they tend to be a little less giving til ridden awhile.

The Lore of The Leather is Transcendant.
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Old 11-08-06, 03:52 PM
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My B66 Champ's leather is of the thicker harder variety. It has a smooth surface while the regular B66 and the B33 have a textured surface. Neither of the 66's have noticeable movement to me, while the B33 feels like grandma's land yacht. The B33 would not be the most suitable for aggressive cycling, but for bouncing around the dirt roads around here, nothing is more comfortable.

--A
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Old 11-08-06, 08:19 PM
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Originally Posted by jcm
Trust me. The coils on a B66/67 are not soft and do not rob spinning effort. Since you are a woman, I assume you weigh significantly less that me - at 230lbs. There is no discernable rocking with stock 66 springs. You will only feel them working over the roughest road shock. We ain't talkin' Huffy here.
+1

At 185ish lbs I don't notice the springs on my B67 until I hit something rough.
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