Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Why did they do away with quill stems?

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Why did they do away with quill stems?

Old 11-29-06, 08:51 AM
  #26  
well biked 
biked well
 
well biked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 7,266
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
My thinking is that threadless forks/stems/headsets became the norm because of the increase in popularity of suspension forks. These items(threadless and front suspension) hit the mainstream about the same time and I don't think it's a coincidence. Suspension forks changed a lot of things, one of them being that the aftermarket fork business became a lot bigger than it ever was before. The idea of all these aftermarket forks having pre-determined steerer lengths would be a nightmare for both manufacturer and consumer. And it so happened that the threadless design is somewhat less fussy and can be made stiffer than a threaded setup, also an advantage on mountain bikes. I suspect this is one of those things that started with mountain bikes, suspension forks, and soon became the industry standard on pretty much all bikes-

Last edited by well biked; 11-29-06 at 03:08 PM.
well biked is offline  
Old 11-29-06, 08:45 PM
  #27  
slowandsteady
Faster but still slow
Thread Starter
 
slowandsteady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Jersey
Posts: 5,979

Bikes: Trek 830 circa 1993 and a Fuji WSD Finest 1.0 2006

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
That is a good point.
slowandsteady is offline  
Old 11-29-06, 09:33 PM
  #28  
dobber
Perineal Pressurized
 
dobber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: In Ebritated
Posts: 6,555
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
There is also the compatability factor. The same fork can be employed on your 14" or your 22" MTB, it's simply a matter of cutting the steerer to length. So now the manufacturer only has to stock one size versus multiple.
__________________
This is Africa, 1943. War spits out its violence overhead and the sandy graveyard swallows it up. Her name is King Nine, B-25, medium bomber, Twelfth Air Force. On a hot, still morning she took off from Tunisia to bomb the southern tip of Italy. An errant piece of flak tore a hole in a wing tank and, like a wounded bird, this is where she landed, not to return on this day, or any other day.
dobber is offline  
Old 11-29-06, 10:17 PM
  #29  
bmclaughlin807
Crankenstein
 
bmclaughlin807's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Spokane
Posts: 4,038

Bikes: Novara Randonee (TankerBelle)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by The Fixer
I use both systems and I will continue to build bikes using both threaded and threadless headsets. But strictly from a tinkerer's point of view, the threaded system is a bit more of a pain in the A to work with........especially if you're hunting for a new or used threaded fork with the correct steerer length.
...

I just replaced the threaded fork on my commuter. Bent the previous fork. Took me one stop, and I had to wait a couple minutes while they cut it to the proper length. Oh, and they charged me an extra $5 for cutting and cleaning it up. If you have a decent shop that specializes in older parts, you should have no issue at all finding a threaded fork to fit a certain application.
__________________
"There is no greater wonder than the way the face and character of a woman fit so perfectly in a man's mind, and stay there, and he could never tell you why. It just seems it was the thing he most wanted." Robert Louis Stevenson
bmclaughlin807 is offline  
Old 11-30-06, 09:10 AM
  #30  
ajay677
Senior Member
 
ajay677's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: For the record, I am not now, nor have I ever been, an idiot.
Posts: 500
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dobber
There is also the compatability factor. The same fork can be employed on your 14" or your 22" MTB, it's simply a matter of cutting the steerer to length. So now the manufacturer only has to stock one size versus multiple.
Exactly. Easier, cheaper for the manufacturer. Let's them sell the bike at the same price point and make a larger profit or lower their price point in order to be more competitive.
ajay677 is offline  
Old 11-30-06, 09:23 AM
  #31  
DannoXYZ 
Senior Member
 
DannoXYZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Saratoga, CA
Posts: 11,739
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
There are advantages to the user as well; everyone wins (except for the guy selling the fork-treading dies).
DannoXYZ is offline  
Old 11-30-06, 03:27 PM
  #32  
CdCf
Videre non videri
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Posts: 3,208

Bikes: 1 road bike (simple, light), 1 TT bike (could be more aero, could be lighter), 1 all-weather commuter and winter bike, 1 Monark 828E ergometer indoor bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Adjusting threadless stems vertically can be very easy, if you're prepared to sacrifice some aesthetics. Just leave the tube as it is (don't cut it) and insert spacers both above and (if required) below the stem. Moving the stem takes no more than a couple minutes.
CdCf is offline  
Old 11-30-06, 03:39 PM
  #33  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,346

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2463 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 102 Times in 69 Posts
Originally Posted by CdCf
Adjusting threadless stems vertically can be very easy, if you're prepared to sacrifice some aesthetics. Just leave the tube as it is (don't cut it) and insert spacers both above and (if required) below the stem. Moving the stem takes no more than a couple minutes.
Yep. And, if you have a bike with cantilever brakes, the cable stop will hold the bearings in adjustment so that you don't even have to mess with resetting the bearing load.
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 11-30-06, 04:15 PM
  #34  
merlinextraligh
pan y agua
 
merlinextraligh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Jacksonville
Posts: 30,336

Bikes: Wilier Zero 7; Merlin Extralight; Co-Motion Robusta; Schwinn Paramount; Motobecane Phantom Cross; Cervelo P2; Motebecane Ti Fly 29er; Calfee Dragonfly Tandem

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 870 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
I changed my merlin from a threaded headset, cf fork with steel steerer tube, to a threadless headset, CF fork with a CF steerer tube. The change reduced the bike weight by well over a pound, significant even if you're not a weight weenie.

Obviously most of that weight savings was the CF steerer tube, but you can't do a CF steerer tube with a threaded headset.
merlinextraligh is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
PeregrineA1
Classic & Vintage
21
02-26-17 06:08 PM
Kommisar89
Classic & Vintage
6
05-25-13 08:09 AM
Kommisar89
Classic & Vintage
0
05-24-13 09:43 PM
Kommisar89
Classic & Vintage
0
05-24-13 09:27 PM
greaterbrown
Northeast
0
04-12-13 05:28 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.