Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Why did they do away with quill stems?

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Why did they do away with quill stems?

Old 11-28-06, 09:13 AM
  #1  
slowandsteady
Faster but still slow
Thread Starter
 
slowandsteady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Jersey
Posts: 5,979

Bikes: Trek 830 circa 1993 and a Fuji WSD Finest 1.0 2006

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Why did they do away with quill stems?

Okay, so many of the changes in the biking world have been good ones including STI, carbon fiber, aerodynamic improvements and so on. But why did they do away with quill stems? They are more adjustable than the new stems. I can understand the issues with not having an open face plate, but new replacement quill stems now have the open face plate. Can someone please enlighten me as to why quill stems are not standard items on new bikes?
slowandsteady is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 09:39 AM
  #2  
Falkon
The quieter you become...
 
Falkon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Huntsville, AL
Posts: 1,283

Bikes: 1973 Raleigh Superbe, 2006 Trek 4300 with no original parts, 1984 Ciocc, Custom Keith Anderson

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
cutting and threading a threaded fork really really sucks.
__________________
Originally Posted by TechKnowGN
San Jose has to be the most boring place I've ever been. And I live in Ohio.
Falkon is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 09:43 AM
  #3  
slowandsteady
Faster but still slow
Thread Starter
 
slowandsteady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Jersey
Posts: 5,979

Bikes: Trek 830 circa 1993 and a Fuji WSD Finest 1.0 2006

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Falkon
cutting and threading a threaded fork really really sucks.
My MTB has a threaded fork. I have never had to cut nor thread it. Unless you are buying a new fork, no one has to mess with their existing fork. It is a solution to a problem that affects a very small group people and inconveniences the rest of us.
slowandsteady is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 09:44 AM
  #4  
PhattTyre
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 707

Bikes: 07 Fisher Paragon, 00' Lemond Buenos Aries, Specialized Langster, Schwinn World Sport SS townie, 99 SS-Works single speed conversion, early 90s Raleigh roadie rain bike, 07 Fisher Rig, Trek 520, and a home-modified chopper

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Threadless headsets and stems don't flex as much as quills.
PhattTyre is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 09:51 AM
  #5  
MichaelW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: England
Posts: 12,952
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Threadless systems are lighter, stiffer, can be adjusted using lightweight allen keys. You can make steerer tubes out of lighter materials such as Al and carbon.
MichaelW is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 09:52 AM
  #6  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,273

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2405 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 78 Times in 55 Posts
From the stand point of installation, adjustment and maintainence, a threadless headset is head and shoulders above threaded. Lots of people think it's a plot by some bicycle cartel but the threadless really is superior.

Adjusting a threaded headset is a nightmare! You need a minimum of 2 large wrenches and lots of time. First you tighten the upper race by hand to take up slack, then you tighten the lock nut slightly. You want to slightly over tighten because you are going to back the race off against the lock nut. You check to see if the headset is binding or loose, then loosen the locknut (and the race usually), adjust the race, and start again. You have to make sure that the headset isn't binding by turning it from side to side and then check to see if it isn't too loose by rocking the bike against the brake. Trust me, it is a royal pain!

A threadless, on the other hand, requires a single small allen wrench. You put spaces, stem and top cap on after you assemble the headset. Tighten the top cap so that the bearings are tight but don't bind, then tighten the stem bolts. If it takes 5 minutes, you are spending too much time on it

And, in the field, fixing a loose threadless is trivial. Fixing a threaded is next to impossible unless you carry those two big wrenches with you. In my experience, threadless is also less likely to loosen also.
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 10:33 AM
  #7  
slowandsteady
Faster but still slow
Thread Starter
 
slowandsteady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Jersey
Posts: 5,979

Bikes: Trek 830 circa 1993 and a Fuji WSD Finest 1.0 2006

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute
From the stand point of installation, adjustment and maintainence, a threadless headset is head and shoulders above threaded. Lots of people think it's a plot by some bicycle cartel but the threadless really is superior.

Adjusting a threaded headset is a nightmare! You need a minimum of 2 large wrenches and lots of time. First you tighten the upper race by hand to take up slack, then you tighten the lock nut slightly. You want to slightly over tighten because you are going to back the race off against the lock nut. You check to see if the headset is binding or loose, then loosen the locknut (and the race usually), adjust the race, and start again. You have to make sure that the headset isn't binding by turning it from side to side and then check to see if it isn't too loose by rocking the bike against the brake. Trust me, it is a royal pain!

A threadless, on the other hand, requires a single small allen wrench. You put spaces, stem and top cap on after you assemble the headset. Tighten the top cap so that the bearings are tight but don't bind, then tighten the stem bolts. If it takes 5 minutes, you are spending too much time on it

And, in the field, fixing a loose threadless is trivial. Fixing a threaded is next to impossible unless you carry those two big wrenches with you. In my experience, threadless is also less likely to loosen also.
Okay, so it certainly sounds like a pain, but how often and under what circumstances does one have to adjust a threaded headset? I have an MTB with a threaded headset(Trek 830) and have never had to do anything to it in close to 15 years. Maybe I have just been neglecting my bike and I am an idiot(a distinct possibility!), but it certainly performs like near new condition after all those years.

I do see how a threadless set up is much lighter, that is fairly obvious.
slowandsteady is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 10:47 AM
  #8  
Treespeed
Warning:Mild Peril
 
Treespeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Seattle Refugee in Los Angeles
Posts: 3,171

Bikes: Cilo, Surly Pacer, Kona Fire Mountain w/Bob Trailer, Scattante

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by slowandsteady
Okay, so it certainly sounds like a pain, but how often and under what circumstances does one have to adjust a threaded headset? I have an MTB with a threaded headset(Trek 830) and have never had to do anything to it in close to 15 years. Maybe I have just been neglecting my bike and I am an idiot(a distinct possibility!), but it certainly performs like near new condition after all those years.

I do see how a threadless set up is much lighter, that is fairly obvious.
You are not an idiot, but it would be hard to believe that there is any grease left in that headset after 15 year or that the races aren't shot.
__________________
Non semper erit aestas.
Treespeed is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 11:01 AM
  #9  
Mariner Fan
59'er
 
Mariner Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Alexandria, IN
Posts: 3,308

Bikes: LeMond Maillot Jaune, Vintage Trek 520 (1985), 1976 Schwinn Voyageur 2, Miyata 1000 (1985)

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Your point about Threadless stems are well taken. I still like the classic looks of a quill stem.
__________________
Mariner Fan is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 11:16 AM
  #10  
ajay677
Senior Member
 
ajay677's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: For the record, I am not now, nor have I ever been, an idiot.
Posts: 500
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Threadless headsets are easier/cheaper for manufacturers.
ajay677 is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 11:37 AM
  #11  
digger
Senior Member
 
digger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Likely North of you.
Posts: 2,162
Mentioned: 123 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 802 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 69 Times in 69 Posts
Originally Posted by slowandsteady
Okay, so it certainly sounds like a pain, but how often and under what circumstances does one have to adjust a threaded headset? I have an MTB with a threaded headset(Trek 830) and have never had to do anything to it in close to 15 years. Maybe I have just been neglecting my bike and I am an idiot(a distinct possibility!), but it certainly performs like near new condition after all those years.

I do see how a threadless set up is much lighter, that is fairly obvious.
You should service your headset once per year (new grease at least). As for threaded Vs threadless, threadless is less maintenance and easier to adjust as stated and somewhat lighter.

ALL my bikes have threaded quill stems...except for my 1 year old MTB bike. I've been adjusting threaded for so long now I don't think twice about it.
digger is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 12:25 PM
  #12  
bbattle
.
 
bbattle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Rocket City, No'ala
Posts: 12,733

Bikes: 2014 Trek Domane 5.2, 1985 Pinarello Trevisio, 1991 Colnago Master, '06 Bianchi San Jose, 1987 Moulton Fuso, 1990 Gardin Shred, '82 John Howard(Dave Tesch)

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Who says they did away with quill stems?


Kalloy mtb quill stem


Nitto road quill stem




Try Here for lots of quill stems
__________________
Bicycle Pictures
bbattle is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 12:54 PM
  #13  
TMB
Permanent Refugee .......
 
TMB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Okanagan Valley, BC.
Posts: 1,256

Bikes: Steel

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ajay677
Threadless headsets are easier/cheaper for manufacturers.
+2

And in addition, they do not have to bear the cost in time, equipment and money to thread the steer tubes.

Straight gauge tube welded or bonded to the fork, stick it in a box and out the door. No "down time" to thread the tube.
TMB is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 01:14 PM
  #14  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,273

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2405 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 78 Times in 55 Posts
Originally Posted by slowandsteady
Okay, so it certainly sounds like a pain, but how often and under what circumstances does one have to adjust a threaded headset? I have an MTB with a threaded headset(Trek 830) and have never had to do anything to it in close to 15 years. Maybe I have just been neglecting my bike and I am an idiot(a distinct possibility!), but it certainly performs like near new condition after all those years.

I do see how a threadless set up is much lighter, that is fairly obvious.
Back when I had threaded headsets on mountain bikes, they used to come loose all the time, especially when used for rugged off-road riding. Fast, rocky downhills with rigid forks pounds the headset pretty hard. Suspension forks help since the force isn't driven directly to the headset.

15 years is way too long a maintainence interval for any bearing. Do it every year is probably a little bit of overkill but pick a happy median like 2 or 3 years. Your grease has probably polymerized by now and resembles teflon more than grease
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 01:29 PM
  #15  
roadfix
hello
 
roadfix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 18,601
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 139 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
I use both systems and I will continue to build bikes using both threaded and threadless headsets. But strictly from a tinkerer's point of view, the threaded system is a bit more of a pain in the A to work with........especially if you're hunting for a new or used threaded fork with the correct steerer length.

Last edited by roadfix; 11-28-06 at 03:38 PM.
roadfix is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 02:55 PM
  #16  
slowandsteady
Faster but still slow
Thread Starter
 
slowandsteady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Jersey
Posts: 5,979

Bikes: Trek 830 circa 1993 and a Fuji WSD Finest 1.0 2006

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bbattle
Who says they did away with quill stems?


Kalloy mtb quill stem


Nitto road quill stem




Try Here for lots of quill stems

I meant on new bikes.
slowandsteady is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 03:13 PM
  #17  
catatonic
Chairman of the Bored
 
catatonic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: St. Petersburg, FL
Posts: 5,825

Bikes: 2004 Raleigh Talus, 2001 Motobecane Vent Noir (Custom build for heavy riders)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Because they aren't as easy to wrk with?

Remove handlebar from threaded: remove bartape, brifters, and all other accessories, pull bar though stem.

Remove handlebar from threadless: Remove cables from brifters, remove two bolts...don't let the bars fall and hit your toes.

One fork does it all, none of this "We have size x and size z, bu none of the size y you need".

Less tools needed for a job is always a great thing.

If you want a new bike with a quill stem, there is always Rivendell.
catatonic is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 03:25 PM
  #18  
operator
cab horn
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Toronto
Posts: 28,321

Bikes: 1987 Bianchi Campione

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute
Adjusting a threaded headset is a nightmare! You need a minimum of 2 large wrenches and lots of time. First you tighten the upper race by hand to take up slack, then you tighten the lock nut slightly. You want to slightly over tighten because you are going to back the race off against the lock nut. You check to see if the headset is binding or loose, then loosen the locknut (and the race usually), adjust the race, and start again. You have to make sure that the headset isn't binding by turning it from side to side and then check to see if it isn't too loose by rocking the bike against the brake. Trust me, it is a royal pain!
The only reason you have all this guessing and checking is because you're not using the other wrench to hold the element in place. This is why you are using TWO headset wrenches.

Seriously, it takes about 2 minutes to adjust a threaded system. All this fear mongering for no reason.

Originally Posted by catatonic
Because they aren't as easy to wrk with?

Remove handlebar from threaded: remove bartape, brifters, and all other accessories, pull bar though stem.
Oh please. They make quill stems with removeable face plates. The other option is getting a threaded/threadless adapter. More fear mongering.
operator is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 03:48 PM
  #19  
MKahrl
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 1,092

Bikes: Rivendell A.Homer Hilsen, Paramount P13, (4) Falcon bicycles, Mondia Special, Rodriguez Tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I've not had a threaded headset loosen for several decades. And setting them up is not very difficult for anyone who has experience working on their own bike. Manufacturers created the threadless headset for their own convenience and are not ashamed to admit it. The removable faceplate is certainly a convenience especially now that there are so many cables up on the handlebars these days. We lost the handy vertical adjustment but that wouldn't have registered with new bike buyers anyway.

I used to think that threadless stems were just about the ugliest thing ever put on a bike but they match modern bikes quite well now.
MKahrl is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 04:10 PM
  #20  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,273

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2405 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 78 Times in 55 Posts
Originally Posted by operator
The only reason you have all this guessing and checking is because you're not using the other wrench to hold the element in place. This is why you are using TWO headset wrenches.

Seriously, it takes about 2 minutes to adjust a threaded system. All this fear mongering for no reason.
Not fear mongering, just reality. A threadless is much easier to adjust than threaded. As for the adjustment, I do (or did) use two wrenches. It's always a game of trial and error with a threaded headset. If you get the bearings right when the race and locknut are loose, tightening them against each other would throw the headset out of adjustment. I

Threadless just doesn't have the same level of futzyness. Take the play out of the bearings and keep them from binding and tighten the stem bolts. Done and on the road. It takes longer to find a 5mm allen wrench then to adjust the headset...and my allen wrenches are right on the repair stand
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 04:20 PM
  #21  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,273

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2405 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 78 Times in 55 Posts
Originally Posted by MKahrl
I've not had a threaded headset loosen for several decades. And setting them up is not very difficult for anyone who has experience working on their own bike. Manufacturers created the threadless headset for their own convenience and are not ashamed to admit it. The removable faceplate is certainly a convenience especially now that there are so many cables up on the handlebars these days. We lost the handy vertical adjustment but that wouldn't have registered with new bike buyers anyway.

I used to think that threadless stems were just about the ugliest thing ever put on a bike but they match modern bikes quite well now.
There used to be a whole cottage industry for making locking mechanisms for mountain bike headsets. Shaft collars, special locking locknuts, special keyed races were just some of the attempts made to keep the headset from loosening. This wasn't too much of a problem with road bikes but it certainly was with mountain bikes. I've seen, and had, many headsets ruined in the course of a day's worth of riding because you couldn't tighten the headset in the field.

The threadless headset might have been created for convenience (although I have my doubts) but it certainly is easier to adjust and install for the consumer. All of my bikes are, finally, threadless and I wouldn't go back. Changing a fork is trivial now, as is adjusting one out on a ride...if it happens to come loose, which they just don't now.
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 05:56 PM
  #22  
catatonic
Chairman of the Bored
 
catatonic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: St. Petersburg, FL
Posts: 5,825

Bikes: 2004 Raleigh Talus, 2001 Motobecane Vent Noir (Custom build for heavy riders)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by operator
The only reason you have all this guessing and checking is because you're not using the other wrench to hold the element in place. This is why you are using TWO headset wrenches.

Seriously, it takes about 2 minutes to adjust a threaded system. All this fear mongering for no reason.



Oh please. They make quill stems with removeable face plates. The other option is getting a threaded/threadless adapter. More fear mongering.
Adaptors are not a solution, it's a bandaid. As for removable faceplates...I have yet to see one that looked nice enough to use on a "new" bike like the OP was asking about.

Seriously, it's not fear mongering...I have one, and know how to adjust it....it's a far bigger pain in the rump than using a threadless setup.
catatonic is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 08:09 PM
  #23  
KnhoJ
Mister Goody Two Shoes
 
KnhoJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 417
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by waytoomanybikes
+2

And in addition, they do not have to bear the cost in time, equipment and money to thread the steer tubes.

Straight gauge tube welded or bonded to the fork, stick it in a box and out the door. No "down time" to thread the tube.
+some more.
It's lean. Threadless eliminates manufacturing process steps and the need for a special set of skills. Any idiot can put together a threadless set at the bicycle mill, preferably for minimum wage while pressing the buttons on the automated Fork-o-Matic.
Manufacturers can generally be trusted to not make production decisions based on servicability over years of service.
KnhoJ is offline  
Old 11-28-06, 09:15 PM
  #24  
pmseattle
Senior Member
 
pmseattle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 451
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute
There used to be a whole cottage industry for making locking mechanisms for mountain bike headsets. Shaft collars, special locking locknuts, special keyed races were just some of the attempts made to keep the headset from loosening. This wasn't too much of a problem with road bikes but it certainly was with mountain bikes. I've seen, and had, many headsets ruined in the course of a day's worth of riding because you couldn't tighten the headset in the field.

The threadless headset might have been created for convenience (although I have my doubts) but it certainly is easier to adjust and install for the consumer. All of my bikes are, finally, threadless and I wouldn't go back. Changing a fork is trivial now, as is adjusting one out on a ride...if it happens to come loose, which they just don't now.
I agree 100%, even though I disagree 100% with your often-stated views on disc brakes.
pmseattle is offline  
Old 11-29-06, 07:53 AM
  #25  
pigmode
works for truffles
 
pigmode's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 2,038
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Its true that threaded headsets take a little more time, dexterity, and concentration to adjust properly. You need to be able to tighten the locknut sufficiently without having the upper race budge from its new adjustment. I've found some headsets to be a little easier to fine tune than others--it may or may not have something to do with tighter tolerances or quality of materials. Seems like they can get indexed in a certain position, and become a little harder to adjustment from that position. One thing that can make the task more difficult is crappy HS wrenches. The Park wrenches from the early 90's had terrible tolerances. The old Campy wrenches were much tighter, and made the job much, much simpler.

I did have a MTB in the early 90's, a rigid Cannondale/w rigid pepperoni fork that was hard-ridden exclusively for 4 years. The cheapy OEM Ritchey 1-1/4" threaded HS never lost adjustment on the trail, and lasted the life or the bike.

Last edited by pigmode; 11-29-06 at 07:59 AM.
pigmode is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.