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Trek 460: Road or Fixie/SS Conversion?

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Trek 460: Road or Fixie/SS Conversion?

Old 01-08-07, 03:37 PM
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axelfox
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Trek 460: Road or Fixie/SS Conversion?

I picked up an old Trek 460 (mid 80's 7 speed with downtube shifters) a couple of months ago on CL. I wanted to get into road cycling and, at the same time, wanted a sweet single speed or SS. Right now, I do about12-24 miles a week on my Specialized Hardrock "city" bike (basically put slicks on), riding around hilly neigborhoods for exercise. One thing I find is that I lose alot of power uphills with the front suspension.

I had started to clean up the Trek 460, as it had been through alot and still had pretty much of the original parts. I replaced the tires and tubes, but kept the other major parts. I actually want to turn this into a road/touring bike so I can take it on my weekly neighborhood rides and do some beach runs, but I'm not sure if the bike is too old to do want it to do. The drop bars are actually slighty bent inwards on the left side and for some reason, the front wheel/headset/handlebars pulls left, and I have to fight to keep it straight. I may have to replace the rear derailleur, and I don't know how easy I will be able to find a Shimano 600 RD for a 7 speed. In other words, more wrench work (and more $) to get it into a lean road machine vs. a SS/Fixie.

In essence, I'm wondering if making this into a road bike will make it into an unpleasant riding experience.

http://www.vintage-trek.com/TrekBrochure1984Racing.htm
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Old 01-08-07, 04:11 PM
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Depends. Possibly the most expensive option might be fixed because that would require a new rear hub. I think the cheapest option would be SS, but if you look around, I'm sure you'll be able to find a cheap 600 derailleur. As for the headset and bars, sounds like you'll need to get them fixed/adjusted regardless ESPECIALLY if you're actually planning to tour with the bike.
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Old 01-08-07, 09:58 PM
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It's getting harder and harder to find parts for older road bikes like that (thanks, Shimano you jerks). Fixing it up to make it a decent touring bike or road ride would not be cost effective. I couldn't tell from the pictures, but if it has a "semi-horizontal" rear dropout then it would make a nice fixed gear bike ( a vertical dropout won't allow you to adjust chain tension). An inexpensive rear wheel from IRO (www.irocycle.com) for $105 plus a Surly cog and lockring would take care of most of the conversion. IRO has both 120mm hubs and 126mm hubs - I think 7 speed is 126, but all you need to do is measure the spacing of the frame at the dropouts to be sure. If the dropouts are vertical, you can still make it a single speed (but not fixed without an eccentric rear hub from White Industries) by using the rear derailleur as a chain tensioner.

But first, have a bike shop fix that left pulling problem before you drop another dollar on the bike.
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Old 01-09-07, 11:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Thor29
It's getting harder and harder to find parts for older road bikes like that (thanks, Shimano you jerks). Fixing it up to make it a decent touring bike or road ride would not be cost effective. I couldn't tell from the pictures, but if it has a "semi-horizontal" rear dropout then it would make a nice fixed gear bike ( a vertical dropout won't allow you to adjust chain tension). An inexpensive rear wheel from IRO (www.irocycle.com) for $105 plus a Surly cog and lockring would take care of most of the conversion. IRO has both 120mm hubs and 126mm hubs - I think 7 speed is 126, but all you need to do is measure the spacing of the frame at the dropouts to be sure. If the dropouts are vertical, you can still make it a single speed (but not fixed without an eccentric rear hub from White Industries) by using the rear derailleur as a chain tensioner.

But first, have a bike shop fix that left pulling problem before you drop another dollar on the bike.
Thanks for the insight. Looking at the bike, I think it has semi-horizontal dropouts (not quite perfectly horizontal, slightly downward angle).
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Old 01-10-07, 10:57 PM
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I fixed the handlebar swaying left. Apparently, it was because of the flat front tire

With reading the sub 700 road bike thread, I'm thinking I might turn this machine into a SS/Fixie because, in the end, I'll have spend about half as much converting it into a roadie with about 1/4 of quality and/or performance.
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Old 01-10-07, 11:03 PM
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That bike sounds like a pretty decent bike. I'd leave it geared and find another candidate for a ss/fixed conversion.

If the bike is in good working order as it is, there is really no reason to upgrade parts. Just oil it, repack the bearings with grease, change brake pads, handlebar tape and new cables/housing. These are all pretty simple things to do, so you can learn how to do it yourself.
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