General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

New Brooks B-17N, Fit Issues

Old 08-22-07, 10:52 AM
  #1  
fluxgame
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Worcester, MA
Posts: 65

Bikes: Raleigh Record FG conversion, Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
New Brooks B-17N, Fit Issues

I ordered myself a new Brooks B-17N and it came yesterday. Put it on my bike at the end of the day and adjusted it to how I had my old saddle. On my ride home from work I found that if I didn't perch my sit bones on the very back edge of the saddle (pretty much in line with the rivets) that the center of the saddle pushed painfully against my tender bits. I found it very difficult to maintain this position on the saddle, I kept slipping forward and had to pay an unfortunate amount of attention to keeping myself back. It's not that I'm particularly stretched out with my sit bones back there, the saddle just didn't seem to want to cooperate in letting me stay there. Also, if I bent my arms to get in an aero crouch, no matter how far back I got myself, I had some painful pressure going on.

When I got home I spent an hour or so playing with the adjustment, sliding forward and backward and tilting the nose up and down a hair (I had it at dead level). None of these adjustments made anything better and most of them made things worse. I figured I'd give it another chance on my commute this morning, which I did, but the situation hasn't really improved.

I know there's some break-in involved with these saddles, but I wasn't expecting it to be painful right out of the box. I certainly wasn't expecting it to be worse than the saddle I had been using that I pulled out of a free bin. I have my bike set up pretty aggressively (normal hand position ~10cm below the saddle), so I imagine that's contributing to my issues. Am I one of the unfortunate ones for whom a Brooks just isn't a good saddle, or is there something else I should try here? I'm prepping for a charity 200k in September, so I wanted to make a decision on this thing sooner rather than later, seeing as I'm probably pushing it in terms of break-in given my time constraint and light weight (120 lbs).

Geez... sorry for the short novel here. Thanks to anyone who actually bothers to read through and can provide some input!
fluxgame is offline  
Old 08-22-07, 11:06 AM
  #2  
lubes17319
Chronic 1st-timer
 
lubes17319's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Lakehood, CO
Posts: 1,141

Bikes: ...take me places.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've heard this so many times, especially from bantamweight riders.

What I propose is that all new Brooks owners send me their saddles for a clydesdale style break-in.
I could probly soften it up in a month or so, then send it back, soft as a baby's behind.



All for a nominal fee of course.
lubes17319 is offline  
Old 08-22-07, 12:52 PM
  #3  
fluxgame
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Worcester, MA
Posts: 65

Bikes: Raleigh Record FG conversion, Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
So, should I shelve it for now and work on breaking it in when I have a more leisurely schedule? Or is it going to take me thousands of miles of painful riding for me to break this thing? In which case I should probably punt it off and try something else.
fluxgame is offline  
Old 08-22-07, 01:29 PM
  #4  
stokessd
Senior Member
 
stokessd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Posts: 200

Bikes: Stowe(3), Terry(1), Cannondale Tandem (1)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Give it at least 200 miles. The first 100 being the worst. It will continue to feel better until it's fully broken in. But in my experience, there's this brick-like period when pain is the highest (it's still way better than any plastic saddle I've ridden though). Then all of a sudden it starts to improve, and will continue to improve for a while. But when it starts to improve, the pain goes away. I've got a team pro that is about 20 years old and has like 30K miles on it, and it defines comfort on a bike. My newer brooks saddles, while not painful are not in the same league.

To recap, first 100-200 miles are hard, then the improvement begins. After the improvement starts, it keeps getting better until you'll give up a kidney before the saddle.

Caveats: I'm 190 lbs, but I tend to ride light in the saddle.

Sheldon
stokessd is offline  
Old 08-22-07, 02:40 PM
  #5  
boston blackie
Senior Member
 
boston blackie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 153
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I had the same problem, and the more I broke the saddle in the worse it got. The breaking in makes the sit bones lower in the saddle and the center stays the same, which in effect makes the center higher causing more discomfort. I had my local cobbler cut out a relief hole a la selle anatomica, but that didn't help. I think there is a lot of shilling going on regarding the brookes saddle here. I wouldn't recommend that saddle for anyone.
boston blackie is offline  
Old 08-22-07, 03:02 PM
  #6  
SaiKaiTai
Senior Member
 
SaiKaiTai's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 2,990
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Shilling? No, it's quite bona fide
But as with all things in life, it's not for everyone.
Unfortunately, you have to try to know
SaiKaiTai is offline  
Old 08-22-07, 03:09 PM
  #7  
Portis
Banned.
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Home alone
Posts: 6,020

Bikes: Trek 4300 X 2. Trek 1000, Trek 6000

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Brooks saddles tend to "push you forward." I just have B-17's, but i remember that being my first observation years ago. Also, it often seems that it is hard to push a B17 back far enough, to wear your sit bones are not on the rail.

Push the saddle back as far as possible and make sure you have as large of a bike frame as you can ride.
Portis is offline  
Old 08-22-07, 03:12 PM
  #8  
fluxgame
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Worcester, MA
Posts: 65

Bikes: Raleigh Record FG conversion, Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Well, I guess this was my try. The fit is definitely far worse than any saddle I've ever perched myself on top of. Including the bare plastic thing that was originally on my 70's Raleigh Record. The freebie I've been using isn't what I'd call comfy after 50+ miles, but it's just fine up until then and after that not as bad as this new Brooks. I'll give it another couple days but it looks like I'm back to the drawing board. Anyone want a B-17N when I decide to get rid of it?

boston blackie: What saddle are you using now? Sounds like your experience might be a good indicator for me.
fluxgame is offline  
Old 08-22-07, 09:54 PM
  #9  
boston blackie
Senior Member
 
boston blackie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 153
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have a Selle Italia Oktavia that I bought from someone here on the forums that is fairly comfortble. I just sent back a Selle Italia SLC Carbonia that was a beautiful saddle, but a little hard on my sit bones, and I ordered a Terry Fly Tri Gel due to arrive fri. and to be used sat. on a metric century ride. In other words, I'm still searching. I'll let you know how the Terry works out.
boston blackie is offline  
Old 08-22-07, 10:02 PM
  #10  
alanbikehouston
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 5,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Try this: raise your bars so that the section of the bars next to the stem is dead level with the top of the saddle. Then, verify that the saddle is itself dead level from front to back.

Most "saddle" problems are not actually saddle problems. They are "bars too low" problems, which rotate the pelvis forward, off the widest portion of the sitbones, forward onto the soft bits.

And, it may take time for the saddle to get used to you, and vice versa. Try riding it for at least two or three weeks with the bars level with the saddle, and things are likely to be much better.
alanbikehouston is offline  
Old 08-22-07, 10:41 PM
  #11  
fluxgame
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Worcester, MA
Posts: 65

Bikes: Raleigh Record FG conversion, Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
So, forgive me for being obtuse, but I think your suggestion is based on the assumption that I'm using road drops, when I'm actually using a pair of bullhorns with an 8cm drop to them (Syntace Stratos 800). So the tops of my bars are nearly level with the saddle, but I normally ride with my hands on the horns, which are a good bit lower. Perhaps it's just that a Brooks isn't the proper saddle for riders with aggressive positioning? It seems a little silly to suggest that I need to increase my bar height so that I'm comfortable with this saddle. I find my positioning quite comfortable and my old saddle accommodated it just fine. The only reason I even considered swapping out was to gain some long distance comfort. From what I'd read, Brooks was the way to go for that, but perhaps that's only assuming an upright posture. Maybe I need to look into a Tri style saddle?
fluxgame is offline  
Old 08-22-07, 11:24 PM
  #12  
Ziemas
Senior Member
 
Ziemas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 10,082
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by boston blackie View Post
I think there is a lot of shilling going on regarding the brookes saddle here.


Laughing at you, not with you.
Ziemas is offline  
Old 08-23-07, 02:13 AM
  #13  
mhifoe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Wiltshire, UK
Posts: 208

Bikes: Genesis Equlibrium, Salsa Vaya, Claud Butler Urban 100

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
When I bought a brooks earlier this year I found I had to have the nose up really quite far. Brooks are slippery, so if you have them completely level you slide forward which causes perenium pain.

Try putting the nose up a few ticks so that the back part of the saddle is flat and the nose points up slightly.
mhifoe is offline  
Old 08-23-07, 03:06 AM
  #14  
jcm
Gemutlichkeit
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,424
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by fluxgame View Post
So, forgive me for being obtuse, but I think your suggestion is based on the assumption that I'm using road drops, when I'm actually using a pair of bullhorns with an 8cm drop to them (Syntace Stratos 800). So the tops of my bars are nearly level with the saddle, but I normally ride with my hands on the horns, which are a good bit lower. Perhaps it's just that a Brooks isn't the proper saddle for riders with aggressive positioning? It seems a little silly to suggest that I need to increase my bar height so that I'm comfortable with this saddle. I find my positioning quite comfortable and my old saddle accommodated it just fine. The only reason I even considered swapping out was to gain some long distance comfort. From what I'd read, Brooks was the way to go for that, but perhaps that's only assuming an upright posture. Maybe I need to look into a Tri style saddle?
You might look at a Tri saddle, but it seems to me that you have a very aggressive setup, and are trying to make a touring saddle fit the bill. Like the 17Standard, the 17N is not a saddle to lay over, or stretch over. They are designed to have the tops of dropbars at or above the peak, which itself should be tilted up. Alanbikehouston is correct. The pelvis should be rotated nearly upright with just the lower spine arched forward. That rolls the perineum up and back, away from the peak. Stretching out over a 17 in an aggressive posture lifts the ischials off the saddle and puts the body weight forward, onto the perineum. The results are predictable.

Developing a light-in-the-saddle style helps, but it is impractical for long rides, as it is hard to maintain and requires alot of tweaking of the whole bike/rider synergy. If you want to keep trying with this saddle, I would: move it forward to get the seat portion under you and the peak away from you (don't worry about formulas like KOP, unless it bothers you). Raise the peak so only the seat is level with the ground. Raise the bars a tad above the peak - say, half the diameter of the bars. Shorten the stem if you can, lessening the stretch.
jcm is offline  
Old 08-23-07, 03:18 AM
  #15  
cs1
Senior Member
 
cs1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Clev Oh
Posts: 6,922

Bikes: Specialized, Schwinn

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 138 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
A couple of things I didn't see mentioned: First, Brooks are kind of slippery out of the box. I slid around on the 2 I own until they broke in. They also have a tendancy to be a little slick when you first apply Proofride. After a few rides you won't slide around so much.

Second, You got a N model. That is narrow. Even though you are only 120 lbs, it might be too narrow to support your sit bones. That's why you are putting all your weight on the saddle horn. You might want to try the standard width B-17. Good luck

Tim
cs1 is offline  
Old 08-23-07, 05:06 AM
  #16  
Longfemur
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,936
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
That saddle design originated back in the days when not even pro racers rode with handlebars that low. They just are not designed for that kind of riding. I don't use a leather saddle now, but I rode for years on them. I always found that they needed to have the nose up, but that's just me. It seems to me, based on my probably failing memory, that almost everybody used to ride with the nose up a bit with leather saddles in the past. A new one in particular is very slippery. It's almost impossible not to slide forward on it. I also always found that for me at least, these saddles also need to be a little more forward on the seatpost, because you have to sit further back on them. Before giving up, I would try saddle a little more forward plus nose up a bit. As it breaks in over hundreds of miles, it will hammock a bit, it will indent from the sit bones a bit, and it may need to be adjusted as you go along.
Longfemur is offline  
Old 08-23-07, 05:30 AM
  #17  
montana_cyclist
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Miles City, MT
Posts: 54

Bikes: Holdsworth Record, Bianchi San Remo, DeSalvo

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hi, You might want to visit with the fellow at Wallingford bicycles in New Orleans. He is very knowledgeable and helpful relative to fitting models of Brooks saddles to styles of riding. You may better off with a team pro or swift than the B17N. I did not like the B17N that I rode for awhile, but really liked the team pro, however, my riding position is not nearly as agressive as yours.
montana_cyclist is offline  
Old 08-23-07, 08:46 AM
  #18  
boston blackie
Senior Member
 
boston blackie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 153
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Ziemas View Post


Laughing at you, not with you.
Laugh all you want, you can't deny that the number of posts about Brooks is anomaly to to these forums.

If not shilling, then perhaps crowd psychology. Brooks saddles are described here as panacea by many. Others it seems - having been influenced by the crowd - refuse to admit, even to themselves that they have been duped.

I have attached jpg's of the modification I made in an failed attempt to make this saddle usable.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
P1030037.jpg (16.8 KB, 23 views)
File Type: jpg
P1030038.jpg (21.5 KB, 30 views)

Last edited by boston blackie; 08-23-07 at 01:23 PM.
boston blackie is offline  
Old 08-23-07, 09:08 AM
  #19  
Ziemas
Senior Member
 
Ziemas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 10,082
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by boston blackie View Post
Laugh all you want, you can't deny that the number of posts about Brookes is anomaly to to these forums.

If not shilling, then perhaps crowd psychology. Brookes saddles are described here as panacea by many. Others it seems - having been influenced by the crowd - refuse to admit, even to themselves that they have been duped.

I have attached jpg's of the modification I made in an failed attempt to make this saddle usable.
It's because they are great saddles. Many folks here, myself included, have used them for many years, even before bikeforums.net existed. Just because you don't happen to like them doesn't mean that everyone who uses one is some sort of fool who can't admit their butt hurts.
Ziemas is offline  
Old 08-23-07, 09:30 AM
  #20  
BetweenRides
Dog Chaser
 
BetweenRides's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 520

Bikes: Trek Emonda, Seven Evergreen, Merlin Cyrene, Trek TCT 5000, Trek Checkpoint

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Longfemur View Post
That saddle design originated back in the days when not even pro racers rode with handlebars that low. They just are not designed for that kind of riding. I don't use a leather saddle now, but I rode for years on them. I always found that they needed to have the nose up, but that's just me. It seems to me, based on my probably failing memory, that almost everybody used to ride with the nose up a bit with leather saddles in the past. A new one in particular is very slippery. It's almost impossible not to slide forward on it. I also always found that for me at least, these saddles also need to be a little more forward on the seatpost, because you have to sit further back on them. Before giving up, I would try saddle a little more forward plus nose up a bit. As it breaks in over hundreds of miles, it will hammock a bit, it will indent from the sit bones a bit, and it may need to be adjusted as you go along.
You speak the truth. Bikes are built quite differently from years past in terms of saddle to bar drop. I've been riding almost 20 years and have seen quite a change over that time, particularly after the advent of the integrated head set. It's funny but most people you see riding with a large drop to the handle bars seem to spend most of their time riding on the hoods versus in the drops. By having a higher bar position, I am able to ride comfortably in any position on the bike, and it is particularly comfy in the drops.

Attached are some pics showing position on my three rodies, as well as the condition of the saddles (B-17 Champion Specials). The Merlin & saddle have almost 9,000 miles and the saddle took +1000 miles before it was truly comfortable. The Lemond has only 4,000 miles, but the saddle has around 20,000 miles on it - this one only took 200 miles or so to break in, and is by far the most comfortable I've ever used. Finally, the Pocket Rocket has around 3,000 miles, but the saddle is relatively new, with only 300 miles on it. That one is starting to break in - not uncomfortable, but still hard. It has not yet acquired the 'hammock'.

The new, shiny and slippery feel goes away after a few sweaty rides start to rub off the finish. My older saddles have a dull finish that is quite grippy. I apply Proofide every few months, more if I ride in the rain. Note that the saddles are tilted up slightly at the nose. I rarely adjust the tension, maybe every two years or so. Another tip on setup, as Longfemur notes - Brooks saddles are slightly taller and longer in the seating area than most saddles, so you may need to lower your seatpost and slide the saddle forward a bit. Try using the measurement from the back of the old saddle to the stem when you set it up, not from the nose.

Brooks are not for everyone, and I would agree that larger, heavier riders seem to like them best (I am 6'2" and 230 lbs.). +1 for Wallingford Bikes to purchase, as you can return a model if it doesn't suit you, and maybe try out another. You might also consider buying a pre-aged saddle, although I suspect you just may be paying more for the privilege of riding someone else's returned mistake.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
IMG_2519.JPG (89.1 KB, 23 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_2520.JPG (85.2 KB, 16 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_2521.JPG (85.8 KB, 15 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_2522.JPG (87.3 KB, 12 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_2523.JPG (99.7 KB, 16 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_2524.JPG (98.8 KB, 10 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_2525.JPG (90.1 KB, 8 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_2526.JPG (92.3 KB, 10 views)
File Type: jpg
PR1.jpg (96.4 KB, 14 views)
File Type: jpg
PR 4.jpg (90.0 KB, 9 views)
BetweenRides is offline  
Old 08-23-07, 10:41 AM
  #21  
SaiKaiTai
Senior Member
 
SaiKaiTai's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 2,990
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by boston blackie View Post
Laugh all you want, you can't deny that the number of posts about Brookes is anomaly to to these forums.

If not shilling, then perhaps crowd psychology. Brookes saddles are described here as panacea by many. Others it seems - having been influenced by the crowd - refuse to admit, even to themselves that they have been duped.

I have attached jpg's of the modification I made in an failed attempt to make this saddle usable.
Well, I guess if you can't even spell the name right, your opinion might be a little tainted, no? It's "Brooks", no "e". But, seriously, as I -and many others- have said, they're not for everyone. Just like everything else in life. One man's meat is another man's poison, and all that rot. But, for some reason, those for whom it is not a fit just HAVE to tell us what fools and idiots we are for buying into the myth. Oh well...

I found my B-17N (and yes, the Narrow model fits my sit bones just fine. Even at 5'10" 193 lbs) to be slicker'n snot and hard as a rock on day one. Got the nose up a bit, leveling out the actual saddle where my butt goes and from there it was fine. It ain't perfect yet by any means -I only have ~150 miles on it- but it's definitely better everytime out and FAR superior to the Bontrager Race Lux that came with my bike. BTW, betweenrides, nice to see another Brooks-equipped LeMond out there. Sweet.
SaiKaiTai is offline  
Old 08-23-07, 10:53 AM
  #22  
JPMacG
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Bucks County, PA
Posts: 400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I too suspect there may be Brooks shilling taking place on this forum. It may just be pack mentality, I don't know. In any case, I am pleased with my B17.
JPMacG is offline  
Old 08-23-07, 11:02 AM
  #23  
mud
Lurker
 
mud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: So IL
Posts: 268

Bikes: 07 Fuji Professional 2.0, Specialized Roubaix SL4 Elite

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My bike had no character until I installed a B-17.

Mud
mud is offline  
Old 08-23-07, 12:03 PM
  #24  
sgray
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 16
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Brooks saddle

Sorry to read of your problem with the Brooks. Based on my experience (am 5' 10" 180 lbs), the issue of your not landing properly on your sit bones has nothing to do with breaking in the saddle. With your bars set as low as they are, it might be you'd need the most narrow of the racing-style Brooks models rather than a B17n. For curiosity's sake, you might try raising your bars to the height of the saddle just to see what happens. The fellow at Wallbike.com sells a lot of Brooks and can offer some useful advice. He also will take back a saddle if it won't work for you. Check out his site. Handlebar height vs. saddle model is very important. With Brooks, generally, I believe the more upright your riding position, the wider the saddle should be and vice versa. The fact that they saddle is slippery for a long time or hasn't adapted to your tailbones has more to do with tilt angle and break-in and less to do with initial fit if you are getting pressure in the wrong places.
sgray is offline  
Old 08-23-07, 01:24 PM
  #25  
Ziemas
Senior Member
 
Ziemas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 10,082
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by JPMacG View Post
I too suspect there may be Brooks shilling taking place on this forum. It may just be pack mentality, I don't know. In any case, I am pleased with my B17.
Do you really think there are people from the Brooks company trying to flog saddles on this forum?
Ziemas is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.