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Which Hybrid To Get??

Old 09-14-07, 01:28 PM
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scottcxm
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Which Hybrid To Get??

I need advice on which hybrid bike. I just started biking and I want to use this bike for the neighborhood roads, bike paths, occasioanal weekends rides (<20 miles). Please any suggestions will help. I have been looking at Treks 7000 line and the fx.

thanks!
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Old 09-15-07, 02:56 AM
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The 7000 is going to be more comfy for shorter rides (more relaxed position, suspension seat post, comfort seat, slight front suspension and bigger tires), but the FX will be better for the longer rides (from the more aggressive/efficient position mostly).

They are pretty different machines in their design and intended use. Both "hybrids", but the FX is closer to a cross of a mountain and road bike while the 7000 is closer to being a cruiser/road bike cross.

I have an FX 7.3, I wouldn't trade it for the 7000 series on anything over 10 miles (any road riding really), but it doesn't take to gravel bike paths that well IMO. It is fine if they are firm/packed paths, if a bit harsh, but loose stuff the tires really don't like. they just sink down instead of floating.

My buddy bought a Raleigh Passage 4.5, it looks very close to the 7000's design. It feels like I have an anchor attached compared to mine especially on an incline or heading into a breeze...but it is more comfy for short leisure rides.

From the limited info I have of your needs, and depending on your budget, I would look into an FX series with, possibly, bigger tires swapped on. Mine has 32c, maybe something in the 35c range (anyone?)?

If you are riding with others, what are they riding on?

Good luck

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Old 09-15-07, 08:25 AM
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I have had a trek 7300 for about 3 months, and like it alot. i ride 6 to 10 miles after work and have done 30 miles on the weekend. 99% of my riding is on the rails to trails packed lime stone i'm planning in the next week or so to have my wife drop me off about 50 miles up the trail and ride home (i can throw a rock onto the trail from my side yard) after putting 300 miles on the bike i changed the pedals ,(wet shoes slipped off the cheap plastic ones ) and added bar ends, so i could move my hands around to keep them from going to sleep on longer rides( it helped alot) i also bought a pair of baggy cycling shorts and that was the best thing i could have done for longer rides. the only other thing i don't care for is the front fork suspension if i stand up and pedal really hard the front end dives and seems to take away from the power to the rear wheel maybe just my imagination, also the bike seems hard to get rolling from a start. when i need new tires i want to try a 32 instead of the 38 to see if that helps get it rolling any better i'm 48 yo 5ft 9 and 200lb if you are younger going on longer rides and can lean over a little more i think i would try the fx they didn't have one for me to test ride at the lbs when i bought my 7300
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Old 09-15-07, 08:42 AM
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I want to use this bike for the neighborhood roads, bike paths, occasioanal weekends rides (<20 miles). Please any suggestions will help. I have been looking at Treks 7000 line and the fx.
for that type/amount of usage; if it were me, i'd go with the cheapest bike from a mfr (and lbs) known for good service.

if you eventually take up riding more seriously, a comfort-style hybrid like the 7000 will quickly get old. if you go cheap, it won't be a big deal to trade up if that happens.


of the comfort-style hybrids, the cannondale adventure line was the most comfortable to me. i bought a trek 7300 because the cannondales were more expensive. i'm presently in the process of converting my 7300 to be more like the 7.3fx

i have a road bike for the road. my 7300 is my weather bike now. fwiw, before i bought a roadie, 30 miles was about my limit for rides on my 7300. once i bought my roadie, i can only handle rides of 25 miles MAX or so. otoh, i can ride my roadie until my body shuts down. so far, 75 miles is my longest ride. my avg ride went from 20 miles on my hybrid to 40 miles on my road bike.
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Old 09-24-07, 12:29 AM
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I looked at the Trek 7.5/7.6 FX, Specialized Sirrus Comp and the Cannondale Road Warrior 500. I ended up with the C'dale. I typically ride on weedends and do about 20-30 miles when I can get out to MUP.

I upgraded the wellgo straps to Shimano SPD pedals (M520) and dumped the suspension seat post for a solid Thomson Elite. I also added Cane Creek Ergo II bar ends for more hand positions.

I currently run Continental Gatorskins in 700x25 and find them to be so much faster than the bomb proof Specialized Armadillos (also 700x25). I think the stock tires were 700x28s but I traded them right off the bat for the Armadillos (flat protection). The RW line up also has braze ons for fenders or a rear rack, if you are so inclined.

Just make sure your bike fits. Find an LBS that you like and has a great service dept. Are you sure you don't want a road bike? I bought my RW in Aug 06 and am thinking about getting a road bike (C'dale Six13). A year ago, I could get comfortable on a road bike, today, I feel much more confident and find the riding position, comfortable rather than streched out. Still, I love my RW 500.

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Old 09-25-07, 07:49 PM
  #6  
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I bought a Trek 7500 this spring. I don't like it. It feels sluggish compared to my friend's mountain bike (a $350ish Trek), which I don't understand at all. Also, I don't think it fits me, despite what the salesperson at the LBS says. I'm a total cycling novice, so I don't know what the the root problem is.

I would recommend buying something used from www.craigslist.com. If you love it, great; if you hate it, at least you didn't pay retail.
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Old 09-25-07, 09:10 PM
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I just bought an 08' Trek 7500. Evidently, the 7500 was improved pretty substantially for 08' and should be lighter and more road oriented (integrated front shock, 7.5FX wheels, etc.)

I was really tempted by the FX series, but I ultimately decided on the 7500 for two main reasons:

- I wanted a bike that could handle rail trails, and the FX series is really not designed for it using the stock tires
- If you add the more comfortable seat, tires, and some of the other 7500 features I suspect the weight would be very close

I agree, that everything in life is a compromise, but my old Trek 830 mountain bike was not very good on the road either (even though it spent 75% of the time there). The 7500 will probably be on roads 75% of the time, but should also do well on rail trails, boardwalks, and bike paths. I don't intend to race anybody...just ride alot and get some exercise while having fun. That being said, I hate cheap stuff and decided the upgraded components in the 7500 made it a good value overall.

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Old 09-26-07, 03:59 AM
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I'm going to be on a Trek Soho 4.0 as soon as they are available.
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Old 09-26-07, 05:30 AM
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I got a GF Utopia a couple of months ago and have been pleased. It is my first bike in over 30 years though so I am no expert but I did a lot of looking before I bought. The Utopia has really good running gear and is relatively comfortable (with padded bike shorts ). Made by Trek now but cost a little more. You might want to check them out though. Good luck.
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Old 09-26-07, 06:08 AM
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DrJ,

I also contemplated the GF Utopia. It seems like a nice bike, but unfortunately no one local had any in stock. There are certainly many decent hybrid choices out there and they all vary in their road/dirt/comfort bias. In addition, some use substantially better components than others.

I was frustrated when doing research on hybrids as very few articles seem to be written for them. The magazines seem to focus on the extremes of the industry (mountain or road). I guess they can't imagine anyone wanting just one good bike that can do it all decently well.

I even had one guy at a bike shop tell me there is no way he would buy one and if he was going to buy an "all in one" bike it would be a cyclocross. Well, I researched the cyclocross offerings and they were all geared towards racing (real thin seat and other racing compromises at the expense of comfort and practicality). This same guy went on to tell me sarcasticly, that the 7500 weighs twice as much as the FX 7.5. Well, I called his bluff...I said, "why don't you weigh them?" The Trek 7.5 came in about 24lbs, and the Trek 7500 came in at about 29lbs. Keep in mind the 7500 had a larger seat, a kick stand installed, a seatpost suspension, a front suspension, and heavier tires geared towards the rail trail. IMHO, not that much of a difference. The frame on the FX series and the 7500 are very similar.

Of course, once I bought the bike, the owner suggested a helmet, gloves, water bottle & holder, computer, a seat pack, an extra tube, a patch kit, and 2 Co2 cartridges for pumping up a flat. I will also need to add a lock and cable. So much for watching every ounce in the real world...

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Old 09-26-07, 06:48 AM
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Originally Posted by yatesd View Post
I was frustrated when doing research on hybrids as very few articles seem to be written for them. The magazines seem to focus on the extremes of the industry (mountain or road).
I've noticed the same thing. I believe the reason is largely that people who buy hybrids are not generally "enthusiasts", and it is enthusiasts who tend to frequent forums, buy magazines, visit biking-oriented weblogs regularly, spend more than they should, etc. I could be wrong, but that's my theory. Similarly, the way that your bike shop salesman treated you is probably a reflection of his being a biking enthusiast. It's unfortunate that he was sarcastic with you about your choice of bike. You are the customer. You're putting food on his table. You deserved better.

I used to have a hybrid, btw, similar in concept to the one that you just bought. It was a surprisingly capable bike, and saw far more singletrack action than it's designers probably ever imagined that it would. I only recently got rid of it, passing it on to a neighbor kid who went off to college this fall.
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Old 09-26-07, 07:57 AM
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Originally Posted by yatesd View Post
DrJ,

I also contemplated the GF Utopia. It seems like a nice bike, but unfortunately no one local had any in stock. There are certainly many decent hybrid choices out there and they all vary in their road/dirt/comfort bias. In addition, some use substantially better components than others.

I was frustrated when doing research on hybrids as very few articles seem to be written for them. The magazines seem to focus on the extremes of the industry (mountain or road). I guess they can't imagine anyone wanting just one good bike that can do it all decently well.

I even had one guy at a bike shop tell me there is no way he would buy one and if he was going to buy an "all in one" bike it would be a cyclocross. Well, I researched the cyclocross offerings and they were all geared towards racing (real thin seat and other racing compromises at the expense of comfort and practicality). This same guy went on to tell me sarcasticly, that the 7500 weighs twice as much as the FX 7.5. Well, I called his bluff...I said, "why don't you weigh them?" The Trek 7.5 came in about 24lbs, and the Trek 7500 came in at about 29lbs. Keep in mind the 7500 had a larger seat, a kick stand installed, a seatpost suspension, a front suspension, and heavier tires geared towards the rail trail. IMHO, not that much of a difference. The frame on the FX series and the 7500 are very similar.

Of course, once I bought the bike, the owner suggested a helmet, gloves, water bottle & holder, computer, a seat pack, an extra tube, a patch kit, and 2 Co2 cartridges for pumping up a flat. I will also need to add a lock and cable. So much for watching every ounce in the real world...

--
Doug
don't sound so bitter doug!

if you're casually riding on mup's or with the family or even commuting....a hybrid or comfort bike is not a bad way to go. with that in mind, most people who stick with a hybrid aren't putting many miles (i.e. 20 miles per ride, 4 days per week) on the bike. a totally upright position IS comfortable for that use. also, you get the versatility of being able to use the bike on all kinds of surfaces.

however, if one starts to put more miles on their bike, you'll discover the upright position on a hybrid is extremely uncomfortable and inefficient. my longest ride on my 7300 was 32 miles. and that was a killer! my longest ride on my road bike is 75 miles. my avg ride on my 7300 was about 20 miles (and that's a generous estimate). unless i'm short on time, i rarely ride fewer than 38 miles on my roadie....and my avg ride is probably over 40.

before i went with a roadie, i was convinced that there was no way those hard, narrow saddles with the bent over riding position, skinny tires and no suspension could EVER be as comfortable as my hybrid. i was soooo wrong.

i don't slam hybrids. personally, i think they're a good 1st bike because it gives you the chance to see what/where/how you really prefer riding. with that being said, i think its silly to spend a lot of $ on one. expensive components are overkill on them (imo). i got my 7300 for $387 plus tax. thats about all i'd be willing to spend on a hybrid.

as far as a go anywhere/do anything bike, i agree, a cx bike is something to look at (i'm going to build one up for myself this fall). that is...if you're putting the miles on your bike. then, i think its important to spend the $$$ on a good frame with a groupset that will last a few thousand miles.....i wore out the bb on my 7300 within a few months. i wore just about everything out on my db wildwood within 4 months. i was putting too much $ into the bikes and i knew i liked long road rides....so i went roadie......i don't regret it for a second.

well, i take that back, i sort of regret that, now that i'm into it, i want a separate bike that is dedicated to every type of riding i do.

happy riding.





p.s. after my cx build.....i'm shopping for a 'bent.
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Old 09-26-07, 08:05 AM
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Originally Posted by JonathanGennick View Post
I've noticed the same thing. I believe the reason is largely that people who buy hybrids are not generally "enthusiasts", and it is enthusiasts who tend to frequent forums, buy magazines, visit biking-oriented weblogs regularly, spend more than they should, etc. I could be wrong, but that's my theory. Similarly, the way that your bike shop salesman treated you is probably a reflection of his being a biking enthusiast. It's unfortunate that he was sarcastic with you about your choice of bike. You are the customer. You're putting food on his table. You deserved better.

I used to have a hybrid, btw, similar in concept to the one that you just bought. It was a surprisingly capable bike, and saw far more singletrack action than it's designers probably ever imagined that it would. I only recently got rid of it, passing it on to a neighbor kid who went off to college this fall.
A knowledgeable 'enthusiast' would jump all over a hybrid bike. The roadie/cross/mtb sheeple is truly the niche market. The thing is, the ad men and LBS sales dogs can only think binary. You either have to buy a MTB or a roadie, there is no middle ground.

A bike buyer who uses their bike as daily transportation, with forays to either end of the spectrum, armed with correct information and at least two brain cells will always buy a hybrid.

I'm currently riding a Schwinn Sierra 700GS, I've done long rides (my yard sick) of 20+ miles, I've had it crawling thru rocky & rooty single track, and I even inadvertently plowed a thru about 100' of swamp with the BB submerged.

I love my hybrid for 9/10ths of my riding, the other 10% I take my MTB for the rougher stuff.
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Old 09-26-07, 08:56 AM
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Originally Posted by scottcxm View Post
I need advice on which hybrid bike. I just started biking and I want to use this bike for the neighborhood roads, bike paths, occasioanal weekends rides (<20 miles). Please any suggestions will help. I have been looking at Treks 7000 line and the fx. thanks!
Hi scottcxm!

Check out the Kona Dew. One of the best hybrids on the market at a bargain price in my opinion.

Another fine bike that you should at least visit before deciding is the Electra Townie. I don't know if you can actually call it a "hybrid," but it can certainly handle both pavement and light dirt use. Most folks either love or hate the riding position, but the majority come to the first conclusion.

Happy shopping!
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Old 09-26-07, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Stacey View Post
A knowledgeable 'enthusiast' would jump all over a hybrid bike. The roadie/cross/mtb sheeple is truly the niche market. The thing is, the ad men and LBS sales dogs can only think binary. You either have to buy a MTB or a roadie, there is no middle ground.

A bike buyer who uses their bike as daily transportation, with forays to either end of the spectrum, armed with correct information and at least two brain cells will always buy a hybrid.

I'm currently riding a Schwinn Sierra 700GS, I've done long rides (my yard sick) of 20+ miles, I've had it crawling thru rocky & rooty single track, and I even inadvertently plowed a thru about 100' of swamp with the BB submerged.

I love my hybrid for 9/10ths of my riding, the other 10% I take my MTB for the rougher stuff.
I completely agree and it's the main reason I decided to buy a higher end hybrid. I don't race, so it doesn't need to be the fastest, but I do want reasonably light and well made components.

After all, I still need to attach a water bottle because I don't have anyone handing me paper cups filled with water, and I still need to carry some basice tools because I don't have a race team following me...
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Old 09-26-07, 10:19 AM
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Originally Posted by FarHorizon View Post
Hi scottcxm!

Check out the Kona Dew. One of the best hybrids on the market at a bargain price in my opinion.



Happy shopping!
Nice bike. Would be great with an internal geared rear hub.
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Old 09-26-07, 03:00 PM
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Originally Posted by JonathanGennick View Post
I've noticed the same thing. I believe the reason is largely that people who buy hybrids are not generally "enthusiasts", and it is enthusiasts who tend to frequent forums, buy magazines, visit biking-oriented weblogs regularly, spend more than they should, etc. I could be wrong, but that's my theory.
I would agree totally with your theory. But, we are having a pretty good discussion of hybrids on this forum and I would certainly subscribe to a magazine devoted to this sort of riding. I would love it. So much talk about "centuries" and such...admirable goals but goals I personally have no interest in. Maybe the administrators will see this discussion and give us a forum section of our own.
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Old 09-27-07, 06:02 PM
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Hybrids can be great fun

Hi Scottcxm: I think you are making a wise choice to consider the hybrid. I got back into cycling earlier this decade on a Giant Pegasus - a flat bar hybrid that looks like most of the so-called fitness bikes they are touting today. It was/is light (Aluxx SL), can handle most anything with stability at decent speed, has bigger tires than my road bike (28mm IRC Red Storms sitting on some hardy Formula Xero 3 rims - note that I'm still happily using the stock tires and rims and have well over 2k miles on the machine), and can take a pothole or dirt road on without hesitation (not that I recommend this, of course). I road this regularly for about two years until I was back in shape for longer distance cycling on my roadie. I still take it out when the conditions aren't right for a road bike and I'm not planning on doing trails on the Mtn bike. I say good for you and stick to your guns when visiting your LBS. I know mine still sells quite a few hybrids on an annual basis and there is a reason they have staying power.
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Old 09-27-07, 08:30 PM
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I have two hybrids--a Trek 7.2fx and a Giant Cypress. The FX is my every day bike. 30 mile rides, no problem on that bike. I only ride on paved roads and paths, so I have 700x23 road tires on it. There's plenty of clearance for fatter tires, but the 700x35's that came on the bike are fine for trails, jumping off curbs, riding on grass (but I am small, so ymmv). I also have used Planet Bike fenders on it, plenty of room for those too. I was torn between the 7.2 and the next one up that was available as wsd (7.5 i think?). I knew I'd be riding it every day and the better components and wheels might have been a good investment. So far, no problems with the lower-end stuff. I ride about 5-10 miles every day, with a few 15-20 mile rides each week. But I've only had it since the beginning of this summer, so we'll see how everything holds up.

The Giant was nice for leisurely trail riding, and I outfitted it with a rack and fenders it was also my rain bike, hauling bike. The upright riding made for a sore butt after more than a few miles, and the suspension fork is the WORST. IDEA. EVER. for a bike that will be ridden on the road, at all. I could not handle a ride more than 10 or so miles on this bike. Maybe less. All that said, for short trail rides, cruising around campus, hauling groceries and loads of laundry, that bike was awesome. I put many miles on it in the couple years I rode it. I broke the frame a few weeks ago (my fault, not the bike's) so I'm using the wheels and deraillers from it to build up a replacement.

That's my story, but I say ride them all. You won't choose the bike, the bike will choose you.
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Old 10-27-07, 08:17 PM
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I like hybrids, unfortunately it seems they put suspension forks on most of them these days. A GOOD suspension fork on a MTB makes sense. A cheap suspension fork on any bike doesn't make sense.
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