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Wouldn't you want to brag about a heavier bike?

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Wouldn't you want to brag about a heavier bike?

Old 09-15-07, 01:25 AM
  #1  
CrimsonEclipse
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Wouldn't you want to brag about a heavier bike?

...

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Old 09-15-07, 01:41 AM
  #2  
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...no one should be "bragging" about their bike...in the end its the rider...

Its kind of on par with the penis forum....
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Old 09-15-07, 02:22 AM
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More expensive bike stuff is lighter. Nobody is dumping money into their bike and making it heavier at the same time. What people don't understand is that it's easier to lose weight on your body than it is on the bike... and cheaper. Bicycle weight is bragging rights for cyclists unless they're racers. Racers need lightness, recreational weekend warriors don't.

Saying I have a 15.7 lbs bike is like saying I own a BMW. I own neither unfortunately.

The only upside to this way of thinking is that it keeps the LBS in business.
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Old 09-15-07, 05:04 AM
  #4  
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My main 2 bikes are 18 and 21lbs. The only shortcomings in my riding are in the fitness department.
Sooooo- I just need to ride lots. Anyway- Id rather obsess over building bikes from the ground up
than replacing parts with the next lighter item.
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Old 09-15-07, 06:13 AM
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Originally Posted by CrimsonEclipse View Post
Wouldn't bragging "hell, I kept pace with a solid tube 55lb bike for 50 miles"
be more impressive than keeping pace with a 15 lb bike?

Except for the car free and commuter sections (who don't seem to care about weight as much
anyway) most riders ride in a big circle because it's the challenge, on or off road. So if it's for
the challenge, why diminish the challenge with a lighter bike?

Did I miss the point somewhere?
Yes, you are missing the point that - not all cyclists have a need/requirement "to keep pace," or ride for "the challenge." You miss the point that not all cyclists have a need or requirement to impress those cyclists who do have such needs.
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Old 09-15-07, 06:19 AM
  #6  
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i have a friend who rides road, and he purposely got a bike weighing about 3x as much as his light one. he goes out for a ride, up some hills and all, then swaps bikes, and i feels like there isnt even a bike there.

having i light bike is great for races, you dont want to be riding a 31lbs bike in a race when everyone else has a 27lbs one.

heavier bikes are great for training, but no one should be bragging about anything
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Old 09-15-07, 06:56 AM
  #7  
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Originally Posted by norco_rider77 View Post
i have a friend who rides road, and he purposely got a bike weighing about 3x as much as his light one. he goes out for a ride, up some hills and all, then swaps bikes, and i feels like there isnt even a bike there.

having i light bike is great for races, you dont want to be riding a 31lbs bike in a race when everyone else has a 27lbs one.

heavier bikes are great for training, but no one should be bragging about anything
Why wouldn't you just fill up a waterbottle with lead shot and use that to weigh down your bike for training instead?
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Old 09-15-07, 07:00 AM
  #8  
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All it is a form of bragging rights/and or envy...gee look at me!. I crack up every time I go to my LBS...all the weight weenies are in there weighing their bikes and comparing parts and weighing them a calculating how many grams they will save. I walk in there with a seat post and saddle off my cruiser that probably weighs about 1/3 the weight of their entire bike I agree the engine is what makes the difference. And besides weight is one helluva an advantage on a long downhill If you are racing at TDF levels and can afford to replace super lightweight parts on a regular basis as they wear out or break go ahead. As for me...I will keep my 30+# Raleigh Sports that I only have to replace tires and brake pads on every few years and in many cases has seem more miles than most of those guys will ever ride.

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Old 09-15-07, 07:33 AM
  #9  
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I recently rode a century on my older and heavier bike. Last 20 miles was a scramble and I was able to keep up with the riders with lighter bikes. It wasn't a race but just a fast pace ride to the end. It was about a 3 lb difference. In the end, its the rider not the bike.
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Old 09-15-07, 12:26 PM
  #10  
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Lighter bikes only make sense for light people, anyway. My bike fully loaded weighs about 45 lbs., and I weigh 220 lbs. Getting a bike that weighed 10 pounds less would be a total waste. However, I am able to keep up with most people I encounter on the road.
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Old 09-15-07, 12:37 PM
  #11  
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I've done several centuries on bicycles weighing 40 lbs.

I also just finished a month-long tour of Europe with a bicycle weighing in at about 70 lbs with the combined weight of the bicycle and gear. LOTS of people do that sort of thing ... go visit the touring forum.

But I will say this ... when you've been riding your heavy bicycle for a while, or your fully loaded touring bicycle, and you switch to your light bicycle or take the panniers off the touring bicycle ...... you feel like you're flying!! You can shoot up hills like they were flat!! It's a great feeling!
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Old 09-15-07, 03:11 PM
  #12  
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Road bikes are built for =efficiency=, i.e. more of the cyclist's power is transferred to forward motion. This comes from low weight, stiffness and aerodynamics. There are compromises to be made among these parameters and the most important of all, comfort. What a bike weighs depends on how all of these things shake out for a particular rider, terrain and bike.

The claim that some parameter that makes a bike more efficient, like low weight, is only important to racers is without merit. Recreational riders that put in many miles will benefit greatly by being able to do the same work with less effort. But again, it comes down to balance and what works for the individual.
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Old 09-15-07, 08:53 PM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by Tapeworm21 View Post
Nobody is dumping money into their bike and making it heavier at the same time.
I've dumped some into mine to make it better for commuting and made it heavier.


Originally Posted by Tapeworm21 View Post
What people don't understand is that it's easier to lose weight on your body than it is on the bike...
I have lost 25 pounds so far. If I lose another 15 pounds, it will be like I am riding a zero pound bike.
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Old 09-16-07, 12:22 AM
  #14  
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Originally Posted by Tapeworm21 View Post
More expensive bike stuff is lighter. Nobody is dumping money into their bike and making it heavier at the same time.
You're not into touring are you?

Cycletourists are constantly dumping money into their bicycles and bicycle-related gear, and it always seems to get heavier and heavier.
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Old 09-16-07, 12:23 AM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by CrimsonEclipse View Post
A heavy is not necessarily "rickety".

CE
+1

My heavier bicycles are SOLID! They're like tanks.
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Old 09-16-07, 09:56 AM
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Chances are that the 50 lb. bike doesn't handle well either. Its not as much fun to ride. It takes longer to stop. The fenders require constant cleaning to get all the dirt and mud off the inside. The kickstand requires adjustment from time to time. The wheels are not quick release, etc.
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Old 09-16-07, 12:10 PM
  #17  
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All a heavy bike will do is give you an excuse for getting up the hill last- or even walking the damn thing. Heavier bikes may give you bragging rights- But I want a bike I can climb mountains on- keep riding all day and get some respectable distance on and not feel like throwing over a cliff so I never have to ride it again.

And I have done unsupported 5 day offroad rides doing 100 miles a day with my 21lb mountain bike loaded to 40 lbs so there are bikes for different uses- But If I want to do a 100miler on the road in under 6 hours- I am doing it on the 15lb bike. Or the 55lb Tandem with 2 sets of legs.
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Old 09-16-07, 12:18 PM
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Arent fatter people more aero dynamic to a point? I mean, round instead of flat? haha.

So much for having 1 nanometer smaller tires to get that extra slick air flow. tards.
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Old 09-16-07, 12:23 PM
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Originally Posted by halfspeed View Post
Road bikes are built for =efficiency=, i.e. more of the cyclist's power is transferred to forward motion. This comes from low weight, stiffness and aerodynamics. There are compromises to be made among these parameters and the most important of all, comfort. What a bike weighs depends on how all of these things shake out for a particular rider, terrain and bike.

The claim that some parameter that makes a bike more efficient, like low weight, is only important to racers is without merit. Recreational riders that put in many miles will benefit greatly by being able to do the same work with less effort. But again, it comes down to balance and what works for the individual.
No the most important sacrafice is from my wallet. Being a college student and supporting someone while they recover from medical problems isnt really allowing for a $600-2200 bike. Sorry. I'll keep riding my huffy omni-10 with broken brakes as I cant afford nor find a bike to replace them with. The drivetrain however runs wicked smooth and I can keep up with my friend who has a Giant OCR-2.

If I'm going to travel more than 75 miles I'm going to tour, and yes it'd be nice to ride that far and be able to run laps around my house when I'm done as I'm not tired, I would rather have a bike that holds up to the elements. And carry my camping crap.

Not like I dont want a Trek 1000 (I'm poor, so shush) to upgrade and play with, but that wont happen.

This is more like segrigation of who can afford carbon fiber everything is apperently sad. Moo.
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Old 09-16-07, 12:30 PM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by Zumba View Post
No, they're not.

There's nothing you can do on a heavy bike that you can't do on a light bike in a higher gear or on a steeper hill. In fact, riding a heavy, rickety bike can screw up your technique.

Your imaginary friend, unfortunately, doesn't know what he's talking about.

That's how Ned does it and he's one of the winningest MTB racers ever....
Trained on a brick of an old Swinn on the hills around his house.
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Old 09-16-07, 01:12 PM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
Yes, you are missing the point that - not all cyclists have a need/requirement "to keep pace," or ride for "the challenge." You miss the point that not all cyclists have a need or requirement to impress those cyclists who do have such needs.
But then again, as this thread indicates, there are some cyclist jack-o's who think that ALL cyclists DO have a Need for Speed.
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Old 09-16-07, 01:20 PM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by stapfam View Post
All a heavy bike will do is give you an excuse for getting up the hill last
Heh. I used that one today...
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Old 09-16-07, 01:26 PM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by TRaffic Jammer View Post
That's how Ned does it and he's one of the winningest MTB racers ever....
Trained on a brick of an old Swinn on the hills around his house.
I think the word is victorious

I'd gladly take a heavier bike on a big hill. Going down of course.
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Old 09-16-07, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Garfield Cat View Post
Chances are that the 50 lb. bike doesn't handle well either. Its not as much fun to ride. It takes longer to stop. The fenders require constant cleaning to get all the dirt and mud off the inside. The kickstand requires adjustment from time to time. The wheels are not quick release, etc.
You obviously don't tour with your bicycle either.

A relatively heavy bicycle (mine is a sport touring bicycle which weighs in at 27 lbs, and I carry about 40 lbs of gear with me) is very stable. It won't corner particularly briskly, and it does take a little bit longer to stop, but it feels smooth.

A touring bicycle is a lot of fun to ride because you're exploring new places, meeting new people, seeing the sights!

On my most recent tour, I rode without my rear fender, but left my front fender on. I have only had to clear my fenders out once, and that was on a snowy/slushy ride. Where would we get "all the dirt and mud" from? Roads are usually quite free of that sort of thing.

What kickstand?

And my wheels definitely are quick release. But even if they weren't that would be no big deal.
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Old 09-16-07, 03:03 PM
  #25  
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It's counterproductive to ride a bike for fitness, and then buy the most effortless possible bike to ride.
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