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Dangers of riding a frame size too big?

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Dangers of riding a frame size too big?

Old 09-06-08, 10:02 PM
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itsthewoo
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Dangers of riding a frame size too big?

I ordered my Surly Crosscheck online, and I stupidly used an approximation with a yardstick to measure my inseam in cm.

It turns out that my bike is about 2 cm or so too big for me according to the standardized train of thought. I didn't discover this until a month or so after I've had/ridden it.

I haven't really had any problems with the bike though, other than hurting my crotchsticles once with a bad dismount.

So, the title is the question; what kind of dangers/drawbacks are there to continuing to ride on this bike?
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Old 09-06-08, 10:42 PM
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What you do mean it's too big? The stand over height or the top tube or what?

I have a LHT in 56cm. I am 6' but have relatively short legs with a 32in inseam, which is the stand over height on the 56cm frame. Other than the fact that I can't comfortably straddle the top tube with both feet on the ground, the bike is otherwise a great fit. As long as you can mount/dismount comfortably, and ride comfortably, what's the problem? If it's a little too long in the top, then you can try a shorter system. Otherwise, just enjoy the ride and ignore the "standardized train of thought" because none of us have standardized body proportions.
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Old 09-06-08, 11:19 PM
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Sounds like the bike is a great fit except for using your nads as landing gear. Unless you're planning on reproducing in the very immediate future, it doesn't seem that there are too many "dangers" of a frame that is less than 3/4" too big.
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Old 09-07-08, 12:36 AM
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Well, from around 1885 when the safety bicycle (essentially the modern bicycle) was invented until the 1980's - 100 years give or take - nobody worried too much about being able to stand over the top tube with clearance and there didn't seem to be any issues. There are many old cyclists with large families Having lot's of clearance between you and the top tube is a fairly modern thing. It's probably more important on mountain bikes since you might be forced to make an unexpected dismount on uneven ground. For a cross bike I guess it depends. You say it's 2cm too big but compared to what? Can you stand over the top tube at all with any clearance? I've ridden for nearly 40 years now on frames that by modern standards would be considered too big (no clearance between me and the top tube) and never had a problem.
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Old 09-07-08, 01:04 AM
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I ride bikes from 18" to 22".

The system is no linger as "reliable" as it used to be (like shoe sizes) The real comfusion came with the MTB`s.
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Old 09-07-08, 07:20 AM
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Personally I prefer a little too large "by some standards". If it's too small and I need to jack the seat way up then raise the stem, overall performance suffers. The bike itself has been adjusted to fit, but unless I'm casually riding.. it's unfitting to seriously consider such a bicycle for extended periods of time.

The "Large clown riding the little bicycle" look is quickly becoming old-school and is more likely to encourage laughter & jeers from passing vehicles.
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Old 09-07-08, 01:12 PM
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Originally Posted by AdrianFly View Post
Personally I prefer a little too large "by some standards". If it's too small and I need to jack the seat way up then raise the stem, overall performance suffers. The bike itself has been adjusted to fit, but unless I'm casually riding.. it's unfitting to seriously consider such a bicycle for extended periods of time.
I would question that performance suffers unless you are talking really small frames where the rider is not stretched out enough due to a short TT. This is not all that likely to be the case for performance oriented riders who ride with the bars well below the saddle. Looks to me like the people least likely to tolerate poor performance (pro racers) tend to ride small frames. Most of the big frame proponents are the folks who like their bars pretty high. Nothing wrong with either approach if you are comfortable and happy with your choices.

My personal preference is frame about three sizes smaller than what Rivendell would recommend and bars maybe 4" below the saddle on the touring bike and possibly a bit more on the road bike. I found that OK for "casually riding" a short 4244 mile 73 day coast to coast ride last year. Since "it's unfitting to seriously consider such a bicycle for extended periods of time" I guess I better stick to such short rides.

Originally Posted by AdrianFly View Post
The "Large clown riding the little bicycle" look is quickly becoming old-school and is more likely to encourage laughter & jeers from passing vehicles.
So that is why everyone is laughing and jeering at me, and I thought those were waves and thumbs ups I guess the likes of Rivendell are new school
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Old 09-07-08, 02:19 PM
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I'm 6' and I ride a 58cm. When i went to the LBS I rode both a 56 and 58. The 56 just seemed a little to small. I have about a 32 inseam and don't have any top tube issues on dismount.
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Old 09-07-08, 03:41 PM
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Originally Posted by itsthewoo View Post
It turns out that my bike is about 2 cm or so too big for me according to the standardized train of thought.
If you can just stand over the top tube (not counting a bad dismount), it would probably be worth trying a slightly shorter stem.

Pay close attention to where your hands want to naturally rest regardless of where they end up on the handlebars. When you find that spot, change stuff around to bring your bars to your hands.
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Old 09-07-08, 04:43 PM
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Dangers? Hitting hard enough to need stitches.
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