General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

thinking of building a bike

Old 01-25-09, 09:45 AM
  #1  
daven1986
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 2,324
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
thinking of building a bike

Hi,

I am currently thinking about my next bike, it will be a commuter mainly. I wanted something like this:

frame: carbon fibre
fork: something with a disc brake mount
brakes: front disc brake with inline travel agent, back brake cantilever or something simple and light
gears: 8 on the back, 3 on the front
pedals: crank bros egg beaters
wheels: light and strong, armadillo tyres perhaps some kevlar lining (i hate punctures!)
rack: old man mountain rack

I have a few questions though:
1) what would be the main difference between a cheap carbon frame like this http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=24249 compared with an expensive one like this http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=23138

2) with the wheels I'd need a disc on the front wheel, but I don't see any sets like this, are they easily added to a normal wheel set or do I need a special front wheel / get my LBS to build one?

3) which make is best for gears/crankset/brifters etc? Campagnolo, shimano, or SRAM? And do all components need to be the same make?

4) will the carbon frame be ok with a rack on the back (shouldn't be too heavy).

5) looking for a very light bike - I know the disc brake is heavy but I do prefer them on the front for all year round commuting - will this sort of set up be quite light with normal cranksets or do I have to fork out more for carbon ones if I want light?

6) I also considered internal hub gears purely for the convenience, but I can't see any way to use brifters with them, is there a way, or should I stop looking at them?

more questions likely to come! (not sure if this is the right forum, if not could a mod kindly move it - thanks)

Thanks

Daven
daven1986 is offline  
Old 01-25-09, 10:32 AM
  #2  
mercator
In the wind
 
mercator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Calgary AB
Posts: 1,194

Bikes: Giant TCR Advanced Team, Lemond Buenos Aires, Giant TCX, Miyata 1000LT

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 122 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Sounds like you should check this thread.

Some comments about the frames you linked:
1) The brand x frame is aluminum with carbon bits, the gt is all carbon
2) Putting a rack on a carbon frame is probably not a very good idea, but I have seen it done.


Good luck with your project
mercator is offline  
Old 01-25-09, 10:44 AM
  #3  
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Posts: 29,298

Bikes: Catrike 559 I own some others but they don't get ridden very much.

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1159 Post(s)
Liked 31 Times in 23 Posts
You need a disc specific front hub. There is no easy way to add a disc brake rotor to a hub that isn't designed for one.

While there's work-arounds, it's far better to keep to the same brand for shifters and derailleurs. Discussions of which brand is best should more appropriately take place in the politics and religion forum.

I gotta tell you, a super light year round commuter bike doesn't make a lot of sense to me. If it was my bike I'd be looking more for reliability and EZ maintenance.
Retro Grouch is offline  
Old 01-25-09, 10:50 AM
  #4  
late
Senior Member
 
late's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 8,547
Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8859 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 25 Times in 24 Posts
Commuters take a lot of abuse. Steel is good, Alu is a decent 2nd choice.
Hard to beat the Surly LHT Complete for the money.
late is offline  
Old 01-25-09, 11:41 AM
  #5  
daven1986
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 2,324
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
ye i saw that thread and liked the look of some bikes in there, but I only really need a front disc brake and wouldn't mind the fun of choosing all the bits myself!

I know carbon for a commuter seems a bit silly, and perhaps it is. I know you can get very light aluminium frames but I always thought that carbon made the ride a bit nicer or am I wrong?

The roads on which I ride are pretty bad so I don't want a harsh ride, and I want a light bike as I sometimes have to carry it up and down a lot of stairs!

Why would a light bike require more maintenance and be less reliable?

Would I be correct in saying then that a LBS would be able to build a disc compatible front wheel and normal rear wheel set without too much difficulty then?

I was worried about a rack on carbon, so perhaps I will start to look at aluminium too.

Thanks

Daven
daven1986 is offline  
Old 01-25-09, 12:35 PM
  #6  
stapfam
Time for a change.
 
stapfam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: 6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
Posts: 19,914

Bikes: Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
C.F. is light- gives a good ride- can be expensive- and can be fragile.

If you are thinking of disc brakes- then C.F. cannot take them. Sure you could fit a disc brake to a Disc specific fork fitted to the bike but this would not be standard and will involve the purchase of a new fork. So you are talking extra expense to fit even just a front disc brake.

Aluminium bikes come in all grades and all prices. And in all weights aswell. The lighter Aluminium frames will be expensive and could once again be fragile.

If you want the bike as a commuter- the favoured frame material is Steel. It will take the knocks of continual use- the potholes in the road and a rack.

So might be time to rethink what you want.
__________________
How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


Spike Milligan
stapfam is offline  
Old 01-25-09, 01:13 PM
  #7  
daven1986
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 2,324
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
well i was thinking a carbon fibre frame with an aluminium fork to take the disc brake.

do you have some suggestions for a light steel frame, how about salsa la cruz (that is quite light) or any other salsa models with disc brakes? I really don't want a heavy bike, I know it may not be sensible but to be honest I'm often not sensible! I do want it to take the potholes and continuous use though.

Thanks

Last edited by daven1986; 01-25-09 at 01:19 PM.
daven1986 is offline  
Old 01-25-09, 01:30 PM
  #8  
stapfam
Time for a change.
 
stapfam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: 6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
Posts: 19,914

Bikes: Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by daven1986 View Post
well i was thinking a carbon fibre frame with an aluminium fork to take the disc brake.

do you have some suggestions for a light steel frame, how about salsa la cruz (that is quite light) or any other salsa models with disc brakes? I really don't want a heavy bike, I know it may not be sensible but to be honest I'm often not sensible! I do want it to take the potholes and continuous use though.

Thanks
Steel is still your best bet for durability and compliant ride. Not certain about the disc brake versions but Surly is a favourite frame but Salsa is a name that even I rate.
__________________
How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


Spike Milligan
stapfam is offline  
Old 01-25-09, 01:55 PM
  #9  
daven1986
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 2,324
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
ye the salsa is very nice, just wondering if i would need travel agents for both the front and rear brakes...

mm very tempted by the salsa la cruz!

am not going to build it for a while, so am just throwing ideas around at the moment
daven1986 is offline  
Old 01-25-09, 02:51 PM
  #10  
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Posts: 29,298

Bikes: Catrike 559 I own some others but they don't get ridden very much.

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1159 Post(s)
Liked 31 Times in 23 Posts
Originally Posted by daven1986 View Post
Why would a light bike require more maintenance and be less reliable?
The way to design a light bike is to start with a heavy one and gradually shave away material until something breaks. Then you add a little more material back. The result will be light but at the sacrifice of reilability bcause you have shaved away your safety factor.
Retro Grouch is offline  
Old 01-25-09, 04:02 PM
  #11  
late
Senior Member
 
late's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 8,547
Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8859 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 25 Times in 24 Posts
If you want a cushy ride get a big tire. You can do that with a Surly LHT.
Most carbon bikes are roadies and won't take a big tire. If you have big potholes, you want a big tire, IMHO. I hit one the size of a car in Boston once.
I was doing close to 30 and thought I was going to die. It was a Mtn bike with big tires, just knocked some spokes out of true.
late is offline  
Old 01-26-09, 01:16 AM
  #12  
mlts22 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 998
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
One disavantage of CF is that a gouge that a metal frame would shrug off would result in the CF frame possibly failing catastrophically on down the road. I second (third) the nomination for a steel frame first, second would be an Al frame.

Also, if you buy a frame and fork that is designed for a commuter, you can usually get one that has built in places to install your rack and fenders without having to improvise.
mlts22 is offline  
Old 01-26-09, 03:17 AM
  #13  
daven1986
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 2,324
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
mm but the problem with those is that often they are quite bulky and heavy. The la cruz is fairly light, and will build up to a roughly 10kg bike which is fine. Don't want a fat tyre as although they are more comfy they are too heavy, I ride a road bike at the moment and find that almost perfect - apart from the lack of a disc brake.
daven1986 is offline  
Old 01-26-09, 05:09 AM
  #14  
xenologer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,592
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 237 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by daven1986 View Post
...carbon fibre frame... ...potholes and continuous use...
LOL



So you ask for a commuter
then turn down all the suggestions people have for making a good commuter.
are you sure you want a commuter?
Sounds like you want a road bike.
xenologer is offline  
Old 01-26-09, 06:03 AM
  #15  
daven1986
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 2,324
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
well I haven't turned down the suggestion of a steel frame. really I guess I want a road bike that is suitable for commuting.

Perhaps something like a cyclocross bike...

either way the suggestions so far have been helpful in eliminating carbon fibre, and considering steel. so keep the suggestions coming!

thanks
daven1986 is offline  
Old 01-26-09, 06:26 AM
  #16  
jgedwa
surly old man
 
jgedwa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Carlisle, PA
Posts: 3,369

Bikes: IRO Mark V, Karate Monkey half fat, Trek 620 IGH, Cannondale 26/24 MTB, Amp Research B3, and more.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
No way to use brifters and any model IGH. Plus, as much as I love IGH, they are not light. Seems silly to shave a few grams off elsewhere only to put an anchor on the rear of the bike.

Do you currently have a bike? Are your requirements built up out of experience with that bike? If not, you might consider going with a basic bike for a bit so you can get some sense of what you really want or need. I don't mean this sound antagonistic, but I think you can tell from the tone of most of the responses, that the list of requirements you started with seemed ill-conceived.

jim
__________________
Cross Check Nexus7, IRO Mark V, Trek 620 Nexus7, Karate Monkey half fat, IRO Model 19 fixed, Amp Research B3, Surly 1x1 half fat fixed, and more...
--------------------------
SB forever
jgedwa is offline  
Old 01-26-09, 06:56 AM
  #17  
daven1986
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 2,324
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
bah, I expected as much (RE the IGH) oh well, it isn't a big deal.

I have 2 bikes currently, Specialized globe sport disc hybrid (1st bike) and then a Giant SCR1 (2nd bike). I got the Giant as the hybrid made me too upright and was a bit heavy, the giant is very nice but the brakes are a bit underpowered in the wet. Which leads me to my requirements.

The requirements don't seem ill conceived to me, except for perhaps getting a carbon fibre frame.

Thanks for the IGH info.
daven1986 is offline  
Old 01-26-09, 07:38 AM
  #18  
jgedwa
surly old man
 
jgedwa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Carlisle, PA
Posts: 3,369

Bikes: IRO Mark V, Karate Monkey half fat, Trek 620 IGH, Cannondale 26/24 MTB, Amp Research B3, and more.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If the main problem with the Giant is simply the braking performance, I might suggest trying to solve that problem specifically. New/better pads? Right pads for the type of rim? Are they adjusted the best they can be? Cable/housing need to be replaced? Road caliper brakes will never have the power of canti/v-brake/discs, but if they are not stopping well, they can certainly be improved.

I apologize for calling the list of requirements ill-conceived. But, the problem, in short, that I saw was that there seemed to be competing meta-desires:

-for a bike to be super-light.
-for a bike that is tough enough to commute on, a triple crankset, IGH, disc brakes, tough (heavy) tires.

The reason one does not usually find a CF bike set up like this is that the fairly modest weight saving of CF over aluminum or good steel would be completely obscured by the increased weight required for those other things.

I keep a bike at work for various errands during the day, and I need to be able to haul it up one flight of stairs. So, I appreciate what is motivating you. I would hate to have to horse my steel CrossCheck with a Nexus rear end up the stairs every day. In fact, for me it is size more than weight that would be the problem; holding doors open and getting the bike through a couple of bottlenecks is a chore.

jim
__________________
Cross Check Nexus7, IRO Mark V, Trek 620 Nexus7, Karate Monkey half fat, IRO Model 19 fixed, Amp Research B3, Surly 1x1 half fat fixed, and more...
--------------------------
SB forever
jgedwa is offline  
Old 01-26-09, 07:54 AM
  #19  
daven1986
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 2,324
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I agree that my list was a bit contradictory. Might not get a triple crankset as I have decided to go SRAM (pending test rides) so that will be a double crankset instead. I only really wanted 1 disc brake (at the front) but I am very taken by the la cruz frame!

Well if the lift is broken at the river underpass I have to haul my bike up and down 88 steps each side, which is why I want light weight!!

The Giant doesn't really have awful braking performance, but I do appreciate the extra power disc brakes have in the wet. Also I always like an excuse for a new bike, plus would quite like a proper all weather commuter with drop handlebars!
daven1986 is offline  
Old 01-26-09, 08:31 AM
  #20  
jgedwa
surly old man
 
jgedwa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Carlisle, PA
Posts: 3,369

Bikes: IRO Mark V, Karate Monkey half fat, Trek 620 IGH, Cannondale 26/24 MTB, Amp Research B3, and more.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
[QUOTE=daven1986;8249218] Also I always like an excuse for a new bikeQUOTE]

Aha! Now I get it. And if you have the money to burn, I fully endorse this as a reason. Building up a Frankenbike is loads of fun.

Okay, so with that in mind, back to the real questions here. Ride quality is partly a matter of frame materials. But also a matter of frame geometry. And don't overlook the fact that tires (specifically, tire size and pressure) make a huge difference in this matter. I would guess that unless you really want the Gee-whiz factor of CF, then aluminum is the way to go. Do they make CF forks with disc mounts? If so, then that might be the way to go to dampen the ride a bit. If not, then how about going with v-brakes on front? Maybe a cross or touring fork. Nothing brakes as well as disc, but v-brakes have plenty of power to throw you over the bars, even in the wet.

Do you have go with brifters? They are nice and all, but there are a couple of options to get the shifting controls of an IGH up on dropbars. I have a Nexus7 thumb shifter that I simply tweaked the steel clamp a bit to get on my dropbars. As such, the controls are right next to the brake levers and just as simple to use as brifters. If not more so. But still, remember that any IGH is heavy as a pig. I love them, but weight is not their strong-suit.

Getting disc brakes on the front of most any bike is simple (if expensive): get a fork with mounts, get a hub that takes rotors. The availability of disc hubs on premade 700's is fairly limited. But there is no reason whatsoever why they could not be built up. And there are 29er wheels (same rim diameter as 700, but usually wider and tougher rims) that are sold that way. All but the most exotic front hub spacing and requirements are the same, so you can mix and match easily. I built up a disc front using Shimano LX mtb hubs laced to WTB cyclocross rims. It was not terribly expensive and made for a tough wheel. Not the lightest thing out there, but then to go down significantly in weight, I would have had to go up significantly in price. If you have more money to go with, then you can really save a lot of weight with the hub.

With lots of money, you can save lots of weight on the frame and wheels. But remember, if you need tough tires, much of that expensive diminishing return on weight will get soaked up with tough tires. A light bike with heavy tires is still lighter than a heavy bike with heavy tires, but as you approach the envelope of weight savings, you really start jacking up the price. I am all for being creative and trying things out, but at the same time keep in mind why one so seldom sees bikes like that for sale or being used.

jim
__________________
Cross Check Nexus7, IRO Mark V, Trek 620 Nexus7, Karate Monkey half fat, IRO Model 19 fixed, Amp Research B3, Surly 1x1 half fat fixed, and more...
--------------------------
SB forever
jgedwa is offline  
Old 01-26-09, 12:12 PM
  #21  
daven1986
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 2,324
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
thanks that was a very informative post. I do really like brifters and I can do without a IGH so that isn't a problem.

Looking around, there aren't that many carbon fibre disc brake compatible forks, and I don't mind going with steel as long as I can get it fairly light weight (2kg or less) - a lot of people say it is more hard wearing than aluminium and a bit more comfortable. As for tyres I run 23mm ones at the moment and although the ride is a little harsh they are nice and quick so I think I will go with these again.

I don't really want to fork out a LOT of cash, around 1500 will be my maximum as this bike will be with me for a long time - which is why I want to get it perfect. I don't need it to be the lightest thing out there, around 10kg is perfect.
At the moment I'm thinking:

la cruz frame and fork
bb7 disc brakes
SRAM Force groupset (without brakes)
not sure what saddle, will have to test them out. I really want to see what a brooks is like!

As you can probably see now, I am trying to get a light frame with the features I want (e.g. a decent length chainstay for panniers - might try to see if I can fit everything in one of those carradice saddle bags - disc mounts etc.) so that I can get more comfortable components (e.g. saddle), and cheaper components (e.g. force rather than red SRAM) while not tipping the weight scale too much.

Is it possible to put proper mud guards on the la cruz frame/fork?
Do you have any recommendations for frame makes? So far only salsa do what I want!

Thanks for the great post

Daven
daven1986 is offline  
Old 01-26-09, 06:02 PM
  #22  
jgedwa
surly old man
 
jgedwa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Carlisle, PA
Posts: 3,369

Bikes: IRO Mark V, Karate Monkey half fat, Trek 620 IGH, Cannondale 26/24 MTB, Amp Research B3, and more.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I don't know the specifics, so I can't directly answer the questions you asked.

But, generally, you want fairly longish chainstays for panniers. You can get a rack and fenders onto any bike. But generally, at least one set of attachment points on front and rear. Usually not a problem to double them up with both fenders and a rack in each.

Throw a Brooks on there, and you are really are no longer looking at a lightweight bike. I love Brooks saddles, but they are HEAVY.

I have a soft spot of Surly CrossChecks. Objectively they are not all that special or light a frame, but they are tough and they can be set up in lots of different ways. Surly Long Haul Trucker is another one (it is a real touring bike) you should glance at.

jim
__________________
Cross Check Nexus7, IRO Mark V, Trek 620 Nexus7, Karate Monkey half fat, IRO Model 19 fixed, Amp Research B3, Surly 1x1 half fat fixed, and more...
--------------------------
SB forever
jgedwa is offline  
Old 01-26-09, 07:47 PM
  #23  
pwdeegan
smitten by саша
 
pwdeegan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Eugene, OR
Posts: 523

Bikes: Salsa La Cruz with Rohloff; mutt parts

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by daven1986 View Post
la cruz frame and fork
bb7 disc brakes
SRAM Force groupset (without brakes)
not sure what saddle, will have to test them out. I really want to see what a brooks is like!

As you can probably see now, I am trying to get a light frame with the features I want (e.g. a decent length chainstay for panniers - might try to see if I can fit everything in one of those carradice saddle bags - disc mounts etc.) so that I can get more comfortable components (e.g. saddle), and cheaper components (e.g. force rather than red SRAM) while not tipping the weight scale too much.

Is it possible to put proper mud guards on the la cruz frame/fork?
Daven1986:
I have this very bike (salsa la cruz, bb7s, running deore xt and ultegra brifters on a 9x1 setup), and i love it. originally i wanted a frame with a disc front and canti rear brake, but i can tell you that all disc is no problem at all. the steel frame is lovely; better than my old aluminum trek, far more resilient to life than carbon, and cheaper than a good Ti frame.

There are some considerations, however. The disc brakes make front racks nearly impossible, and rear racks for panniers slightly more difficult. I use an Axiom Streamliner rack for my rear, although Tubus makes a much hardier version; the Axiom is more than enough more my sub-50# load max, and normal 20# loads.

The disc brakes also interfere with dual-stay fenders. This is an easy fix: buy full fenders that are single stay (e.g., Honjo, VO, and at least one model of Planet Bike fenders). I run full 40mm aluminum fenders from Velo Orange (VO) at the moment, which accommodate my 35mm Nokian studded tyres. In the summer i run a thinner fender over 28mm tyres.

All in all, this is the most perfect bike for me. It may not be the most ridiculous spandex TdF machine, but it brings me pure riding JOY, across the road, and over the trails. There are some other frames like the La Cruz that may also be worth checking out. But i'm one very satisfied rider.
pwdeegan is offline  
Old 01-27-09, 07:32 AM
  #24  
daven1986
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 2,324
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
cool, glad to hear someone has something similar.

not bothered really about front racks, and i use the topeak super tourist disc rear rack on my hybrid and it is very solid, with decent clearance for the brakes, I also have the non-disc version on my giant.

Not too worried about single stay fenders as long as they are secure enough, but mud guards are definitely necessary!

What is the ride quality like one the thinner tyres when compared to aluminium frames? Also did you need travel agents for the brifters and brakes, or did the brakes provide enough pull?

jgedwa I know they are heavy, which is why I'm trying to lighten the rest of the bike, do you think a 10kg bike is possible with a brooks, and a steel frame? I may not even like the saddle, but it is a consideration.

It is so hard, when you want everything in a bike!
daven1986 is offline  
Old 01-27-09, 07:54 AM
  #25  
jgedwa
surly old man
 
jgedwa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Carlisle, PA
Posts: 3,369

Bikes: IRO Mark V, Karate Monkey half fat, Trek 620 IGH, Cannondale 26/24 MTB, Amp Research B3, and more.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Avid, at least, makes disc brakes for both road/canti levers as well as v-brake levers. So you do not need a work-around on cable pull.

Some people do not like Brooks saddles. Many (myself included) love them. It very much seems to be a personal preference thing. I think, generally, that people that want to be down low in an aero position tend not to like them. Maybe the super-expensive Swallow or Swift work for them, however.

Here is my crazy recommendation: can you find a nice old aluminum rigid MTB to base this thing around? Maybe a Klein? It would be hard to find a bike that is much lighter than that without ratcheting up in price significantly. And, since you need to be able to carry your bike up stairs, you will really appreciate the shorter wheelbase of a MTB. The only problem would be a rear rack, since the stays are so short. Smaller frame and smaller wheels mean it is easier (and cheaper) to keep the weight down. I lug a light aluminum-framed Miyata rigid MTB up and down stairs, and through doorways, and around other foot traffic in hallways every day. I have found that the small size of the bike is at least as important as the low weight for this. I can hardly imagine doing the same with my CrossCheck with fenders and rack and dropbars.

jim

p.s, its not hard; its fun building a bike
__________________
Cross Check Nexus7, IRO Mark V, Trek 620 Nexus7, Karate Monkey half fat, IRO Model 19 fixed, Amp Research B3, Surly 1x1 half fat fixed, and more...
--------------------------
SB forever
jgedwa is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.