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-   -   Quality tools that I can pack for a ride? (https://www.bikeforums.net/general-cycling-discussion/552434-quality-tools-i-can-pack-ride.html)

w1ljmm 06-16-09 11:24 AM

Quality tools that I can pack for a ride?
 
Hi all,
I am interested in taking longer bike rides with the family (bike paths and trails). I would like to pack some essential tools in case one of us breaks down. Could someone please list what the essential tools should be? I am pretty handy with tools and have learned that quality pays for itself. Could you also recommend what tools you have had the best experience with? Last thing I want to do is be broken down with tools that can get the job done.

Pat 06-16-09 11:59 AM

Some tools are obvious. For flats, you need to carry spare tubes, tire irons, and something to inflate the tubes like a pump or C02 inflator. Once every great while, you will have a flat that is produced by a gash in the sidewall. You could carry something that you can use as a "boot" to put between the tube and the gash in the tire.

A set of allen wrenches can be nice to have. Most of the adjustments on your bike require allen wrenches.

Once every very great while, you will have a chain break and carrying a chain tool would be the thing to do for that. But I don't think the chance is good enough to warrant that precaution.

I used to carry spoke wrenches in case I broke a spoke so I could field true my wheel in case of that. My present wheels are bullet proof enough that I don't need to.

The other thing to carry is a bit of money, a credit card, and a cell phone. This is in case you have a catastrophic unforseen breakdown and have to call for a ride or a taxi.

mijome07 06-16-09 12:14 PM

Park Tool is your friend.

Panthers007 06-16-09 12:47 PM

I carry a Topeak Alien II multi-tool, a patch-kit and a VAR Tire-Tool - like a Kool Stop Tire-Jack, but very lightweight and portable. Unless I'm run over by an idiot, I can probably fix anything that goes south. At least enough to get me home.

Retro Grouch 06-16-09 12:49 PM

If you've got the tools etc. necessary to handle your own flat tires, you're 98% of the way there. A few allen wrenches will take you maybe another 1%.

Personally, I'd rather rely on my cell phone than pack the tools and spares necessary beyond that.

stapfam 06-16-09 01:42 PM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by Retro Grouch (Post 9111684)
If you've got the tools etc. necessary to handle your own flat tires, you're 98% of the way there. A few allen wrenches will take you maybe another 1%.

Personally, I'd rather rely on my cell phone than pack the tools and spares necessary beyond that.

Have to agree- Puncture repair and a multitool is all you need -unless you are taking multi day touring rides.

Only difference for me is if I have just changed something like a cassette and then I take a 5 mile ride to make sure I have fitted it correctly and then check it at home after the 5 mile ride.

Although I do have one bike that breaks things frequently- that is an offroad tandem and the spares and tools necessary to keep this on the trails does mean that I do carry of lot with me.

HandsomeRyan 06-16-09 02:11 PM

From another thread; this is what I bring with me when I ride (I ride a Fixed gear primarily so you don't need a lockring spanner for a freewheeling multi-speed bike)

http://i64.photobucket.com/albums/h1...n/IMG_0827.jpg

This is what I keep at home in addition to some other wrenches, screw drivers, and other non-bike-specific tools:

http://i64.photobucket.com/albums/h1...n/IMG_0828.jpg

Panthers007 06-16-09 04:07 PM

I have an entire repair-shop in my house - but I'm sure not going to haul that around with me. I'd have to be followed by a pick-up truck. And that would defeat my entire purpose in riding a bike! LOL.

w1ljmm 06-17-09 12:30 PM

Great replies ! Thank you very much for you input.

trailfinder41 06-18-09 11:32 AM

Carry "light"
 
The best saddle bag tool to purchase is one that is a light weight multi-tool in one including a chain link remover. A lot of the beginner riders always travel out there on the road as if they are going "camping" out on the road for a few hour road ride. If you are one that likes to carry a lot of things for yourself, I would consider getting a small bike back pack, which can also carry H2O. (I.E. Camelbaks). The only main essentials a rider needs to carry are the following:
1) Spare tube
2) Levers ( a pair is fine) >>>>>These are just the essentials that all riders will ever need in their
3) one-multi tool saddle bag
4) patch kit for flats

Extra's:
Personal items (keys, etc.)

The best size I would recommend for a bike saddle bag is around the smallest at least 32 ci. (cubic Inches of cargo space) Hope this was helpful> Happy Riding.-From San Diego:roflmao2:

alhedges 06-18-09 12:01 PM

The minimum for most people would be:

Patch kit
Tire levers
Pump

But, in addition, I always carry:

Spare tube (quicker than patching)
15mm stubby wrench (my rear tire bolts on)
Allen wrench multi tool (for seat or other adjustments)
Allen bolts (I have lost some from my rack)
Zip ties (lightweight and easy way to fix a lot of things)

HandsomeRyan 06-18-09 01:05 PM

More important than just carrying a pump/co2 and a patch kit is making sure you know how to use them. Patching tubes isn't hard but many people seem to struggle with it. You have to scuff the area well and let the glue dry before applying the patch.

Billy Bones 06-18-09 02:16 PM

Good thread. I'll add that you should FORCE yourself to use your 'on-the-road' kit to perform pre-ride adjustments and as much bike repair duty as you can, NOT your home toolkit.

1. This will quickly let you know exactly what OTHER tools you need to pack. [Like that bigger allen wrench you'll need to adjust saddles that prolly' isn't on your multi-tool.]

2. This will give you a 'feel' for the tools that you'll need on the road.

bagel007 06-18-09 02:29 PM


Originally Posted by alhedges (Post 9124697)
The minimum for most people would be:

Zip ties (lightweight and easy way to fix a lot of things)

Excellent idea! But how do you shorten/cut long ends of zip ties? With clippers it's easy, but you don't carry them with you, I assume. Is there a trick to it I'm not aware of?

HandsomeRyan 06-18-09 03:46 PM


Originally Posted by bagel007 (Post 9125863)
Excellent idea! But how do you shorten/cut long ends of zip ties? With clippers it's easy, but you don't carry them with you, I assume. Is there a trick to it I'm not aware of?

bite em off.

http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g9...eek/Pacman.gif <nom nom nom

StephenH 06-18-09 09:00 PM

Just go over your bike and see what all it takes to adjust everything that might need adjusting and fix flats and that should cover it.

bagel007 06-18-09 09:23 PM

I'm surprised that no one mentioned duct tape, postal packaging tape or something similar. Or they are just to bulky to carry around.

cyclocommuter 06-19-09 05:56 AM

I have a piece of duct tape wrapped around my air pump... comes handy as a boot in case the tire suffers a gash. I try to limit the stuff I carry to a minimum on solo training and group rides: tube, pump (with some duct tape wrapped around it), a pair of tire levers, 4 allen keys (adjust derailleurs, seat, headset), self adhesive patches, dollar bills, and cell phone. For century/longer rides, I add a patch kit and maybe another tube.

enine 06-19-09 07:40 AM

I bought this
http://www.parktool.com/products/det...=17&item=BTR-1
seems to have about everything.
Already used the pump on someone elses bike during the last ride.

alhedges 06-19-09 10:39 AM


Originally Posted by bagel007 (Post 9125863)
Excellent idea! But how do you shorten/cut long ends of zip ties? With clippers it's easy, but you don't carry them with you, I assume. Is there a trick to it I'm not aware of?

I've just left the end hanging out until I got home. Admittedly, that's not as aero...:)

w1ljmm 06-22-09 08:54 AM

Great ideas. Thanks for the new add-ons.

AndrewP 06-22-09 10:56 AM

If any member of your family has a bike without quick release hubs you will also need an adjustable wrench to fit the axle nuts. A spoke wrench is also useful to make a wheel rideable after hitting the rim on a major pothole or spoke breakage.

neilfein 06-22-09 11:12 AM


Originally Posted by AndrewP (Post 9145402)
If any member of your family has a bike without quick release hubs you will also need an adjustable wrench to fit the axle nuts.

I carry a 5/8" mini ratcheting wrench with my folding bike, which doesn't have QR hubs. It takes a little more elbow grease, but is so convenient! I no longer carry an adjustable wrench.

Allen wrenches are without a doubt the tool I carry that gets used the most. You really only need a few sizes for most bikes - no need to carry the entire set.

Here's a gratuitous shot of my Acorn Bags tool roll I keep on my touring bike:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3323/...1aface3bb2.jpg

In order of what gets used the most:

Allen wrenches
Needlenose pliers (these will also snip extra plastic off the end of a zip tie )
Zip ties wrapped around a rag
Assorted screws, nuts, and bolts
Screwdrivers
Tire levers
Duct tape wrapped around a stubby pencil
Rubber gloves (which I've never used)

With this loaded up, I toss a pump and some tubes in my trunk bag and I have everything I need.

GeoLes 06-22-09 11:44 AM

I gotta go with keep it simple. A multi-tool, a set of tire levers, a patch kit, replacement inner tube and a small frame pump are about all you need. Just make sure the allen wrench set included in the multi-tool fits the nuts on your bike. Just get a small under-the-saddle bag, keep them there and forget about them. They will always be there when you need them.


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