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Diamondback Outlook MTB 2004 model

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Diamondback Outlook MTB 2004 model

Old 09-23-04, 11:17 AM
  #1  
trickdog
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Diamondback Outlook MTB 2004 model

A LBS has these bikes on clearance for a real good price. I was thinking of gettting one for light riding around the local trails as my new road bike is not quite able to tackle this type of riding. Also I thought it The diamondback would make a good rainy/winter commuter bike (approx 20ks per day).

Does anyone have any experience with these bikes. I know they are not a high quality bike/components, however as I stated above, the price seems right, also I have read some reviews on the net and they seem fairly positive overall.
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Old 09-23-04, 11:31 AM
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catatonic
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Great bike for the price. I have one I put between 3-4 thousand road miles on and with exception of the suspension fork besing screwed up (not clydesdale friendly, I was 260 when I got it, 230 when I stopped using it), the bike is in good enough shape to do at least another four thousand.

I highly reccomend swapping the revos**t shifters for some rapidfires though, and getting some long grips. I use pedro dice grips on mine...very comfy, and cheap.
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Old 09-23-04, 12:06 PM
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I gpt one of these this past spring for $200. It's the first bike I've ridden in about nine years, so I can't compare it to more expensive bikes. I ride it without any modifications (except having added toe clip pedals from Wellgo) on the rodes, rails to trails, and some mountain biking. So far no problems, except that there's one gear combo that is a little noisy for some reason (not cross chaining - it's the middle gear front and back), but I think that's partly to do with the front derailler never having been properly set-up (I got the bike at Dick's Sporting Goods). I usually do 18 miles on it, with 50 to 60 once a week.

It's great on the roads, great on the rails to trails, good on fire roads (is that what's meant by "double track"?), and ok on mountain biking trails. (I've only been on the latter twice, but it seems the Outlook's suspension has a hard time on rough trails, and it also seems like the BB is too low or something . . .)

Grips are a bit short. Brake pads seem like they lack stopping power, so the rims need to be cleaned often. I want to change the break pads soon. Saddle is great - for me anyway.

Bottom line is it's the best $200 I've spent in a long time.

Hey Catatonic, how come you think rapid fire shifters are better? (I've never used them and don't actually know how they work.)
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Old 09-23-04, 04:09 PM
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Well, I found the twist shifters were very easy to misshift if your doing any hard riding, and I was slightly dubious of their quality.

Once I got rapidfire, I was able to shift without compromising control in any way, the shifts were precise and fast, and the quality seems to be far better.

Plus which would you rather do, release the grip and twist a "knob", or just pull a trigger or push a thumb lever?

Plus 90% of the higher-end bikes will have rapid-fire style shifters, so it's good to already be comfortable with it. I think the combo shifters (integrated v-brake lever) was about $40 if I'm not mistaken.


Yeah the grips are short as part of your shifter layout. twist-shifts use shorter grips since the shifter is also part of your grip. As far as center-center drivetrain noise...I have it too, it's pretty much normal for that bike.

The brakes are plenty powerful, if yours arent, take it back to the LBS and have them, re-adjust the cables. Cable stretch can seriously screw you up. Usually after two weeks, three tops, take the bike back for a cable tightening, since htey will stretch. I can usually stop violently enough when I have to that i could endo even if I was behind hte saddle putting my weight directly above the rear axle....the only weakness with those brakes is they won't take doing somehting like that very often...but to stop a guy as heavy as me, and bike, at the speeds I move (about 18mph) is pretty heavy. My roadbike's di-compe brakes dont even come close in stopping power.

BUT....be weary if you plan on using panniers, I had lots of heel clearance issues, so keep that in mind if you wnat to go the rack+panniers commuter route. i ended up mostly using a messenger bag for commuting, and still do.

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Old 09-23-04, 06:04 PM
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Did you ever change the brake pads to something other than what the bike came with? I actually tightened up the brake cables a couple of weeks ago. But it almost seems like I would need to turn the barrel adjuster a little every couple of weeks in order to keep it as tight as I like.
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Old 09-23-04, 07:34 PM
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Nope, stock parts on the entiore braking setup with exception to those levers that were part of my rapid-fire shifters. It takes a few hundred miles before they really shine. You might also have glazed over pads if your still having issues, consider taking a bastard file to the sruface of the pad to rub the glazed over rubber off...be sure to keep the braking surface at the same angle though.
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Old 09-23-04, 08:29 PM
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I have a 2001 Diamondback Sorrento, which is a notch higher up from the Outlook, and it's held up great. I've had to replace the drivetrain twice and upgraded to rapid fire, but I've ridden the hell out of it. Just make sure your LBS cares for a $200 Outlook like it does for a $2000 DBR.
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