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Do you ride step-through bikes (whether you are a man or woman)?

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View Poll Results: Do you ride a step-through bike?
I am a man, and I don't ride step-through bike--that's for women!
30
28.57%
I am a woman, and I don't ride step-through bike.
8
7.62%
I am a man, and I ride a step-through bike--it's not just for women!
42
40.00%
I am a woman, and I ride a step-through bike--it's more convenient.
14
13.33%
I don't know my gender, or what step-through is.
11
10.48%
Voters: 105. You may not vote on this poll

Do you ride step-through bikes (whether you are a man or woman)?

Old 10-24-10, 06:36 AM
  #51  
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Originally Posted by vol View Post
Assuming I know what you mean by "U-frame"... It seems "V-frame" is structurally stronger than U-frame, thus could be lighter (closer to horizontal top tube than U-frame)?

The nice thing about a U-frame (especially an aluminium one) is that they can make it like a "Box Frame" with asymmetrical tubing for extra strength. The "V Frame" (or what I call a drop tube frame) is naturally stronger than a U-frame (I think), but it get's to a point where how much stronger than strong enough does a person need... One of the things I actually do love about a step through type frame is that there are so many different types of them. They are like the "Sport Utility Vehicle" of bicycles.

This is what I'm talking about when I say U-frame... Mine weighs about the same as my steel Mixte, around 28 pounds, with all the accessories on it.

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Old 10-24-10, 08:47 AM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by tatfiend View Post
My big complaint is that most step through bikes have too small a frame. Thinking of building up a VO or Soma mixte with a 56 to 58 cm frame. I also note that the Breezer Uptown does not call their no top tube frames "ladies" but "Low-Step", and offers them in frame sizes upto 21". To me a step through frame makes a lot of sense for a urban transport bike.

Rich Wood
Originally Posted by wahoonc View Post
Bingo! I want to see some 24"/60cm step through! They do make a few mixte in that size range though.

Aaron
I have not been following this thread enough so maybe this was posted. there are atleast two companies making larger Mixte frames but they are about $500

http://www.somafab.com/bvista.html


http://store.velo-orange.com/index.p.../mixte-72.html

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Old 10-24-10, 08:53 AM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by Bionicycle View Post
This is what I'm talking about when I say U-frame... Mine weighs about the same as my steel Mixte, around 28 pounds, with all the accessories on it.
I see. Are there terms to distinguish this type (straight top tube) and this type (top tube slightly bent at the bottom) of step-throughs? The latter seems to be in between the picture you posted and the "V-frame".
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Old 10-24-10, 10:12 AM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by Bianchigirll View Post
I have not been following this thread enough so maybe this was posted. there are atleast two companies making larger Mixte frames but they are about $500

http://www.somafab.com/bvista.html


http://store.velo-orange.com/index.p.../mixte-72.html

Both of those frames are under the magic 60cm size range. FWIW I ride a 64/65cm road frame. I do ride smaller frames on some of my upright bikes, because that is all I can get. I have two bikes that actually are the "correct" size for me. But I have spent most of my life learning how to swap pieces and parts to make things work for me.

Aaron
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Old 09-07-13, 09:02 PM
  #55  
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Bump up for more votes.

P.S. This seems to be designed for men?

Last edited by vol; 09-07-13 at 09:48 PM.
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Old 09-08-13, 12:05 AM
  #56  
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I'm a guy that doesn't ride a mixte, but only because I don't own one.

My current visual health means that my speed demon days are a thing of the past, and I've been contemplating something with a bit more relaxed geometry that can also be used for utility purposes- a mixte frame would be ideal for my needs.
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Old 09-08-13, 03:53 AM
  #57  
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Do "compact" frames count? I never had a step-through, as I was too tall from about age 14 on. North American bike shops only seemed to have mixtes and step-throughs in small sizes back then. However, now I have a hybrid with a very sloped top tube and if I roll it up to a curb, I can bring my leg over the top tube as if it's a step-through. I've even ridden to work in a dress once or twice, although it's not a good idea in a windy prairie city.
For years I've been told (mainly by young male bike shop employees) that mixtes are to flexible, but it seems to me a compact frame should be even more whippy, since it doesn't have that third seat stay at the back. Yet, it's not the case, so mixtes must not be all that whippy either.
Every year on the MS Bike Tour down at Watrous, we've seen a man in his 80s riding a step-through. He does the whole thing, just not the challenge loops. Step-throughs and mixtes might become more common in the next 20 years as large numbers of baby boomers hit their 80s and beyond.
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Old 09-08-13, 07:24 AM
  #58  
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I find the usage of the term 'gender' in this discussion fascinating. I suspect most are using it synonymously with sex, which I suppose is a very modern usage, although the discussion could really be much more sophisticated if gender were used within the Feminist and social science context, or even if it were used in the more traditional sense of masculinity and femininity. I mean, we dig that a transgendered person can ride a bike, right?
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Old 09-08-13, 08:04 AM
  #59  
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Yes, and if said tranny is say, MTF, she would count as a woman for the purposes of this poll. No need to overcomplicate things.
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Old 09-08-13, 08:46 AM
  #60  
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no, because i just don't like the look of them. i'm short, at 5'5", but i will still always prefer a bike with a horizontal top tube.

when i'm old and can't swing my leg over, then maybe i'll reconsider
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Old 09-09-13, 05:55 AM
  #61  
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Many years ago, I bought my then-wife a Motobecane mixtie, as it fit her (she was short). I raised the seat and rode it a few times myself, and liked it. I think the lateral tubes make for better bracing and more stiffness in the horizontal plane, giving the bike better pedal response. The lack of a top tube allows for more flex in the vertical plane, giving the rider better comfort. I thought it was the best of both worlds - a nice mix of speed and comfort. If only they came in 531!

More recently, I bought wife #2 a Peugeot mixtie (yeah, short again), and it now resides with my daughter. I have a scheme to swap my Schwinn with her for the mixtie, and move all the components from my PX-10 over to the mixtie. Go ahead, call me crazy...
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Old 09-09-13, 04:44 PM
  #62  
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Radagast the Beige-and-Black does not have breasts. Neither Orion nor The Black Pearl has testicles. They are all owned by a female, and are therefore a woman's bikes.
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Old 09-09-13, 06:08 PM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by Lazarus Short View Post
Many years ago, I bought my then-wife a Motobecane mixtie, as it fit her (she was short). I raised the seat and rode it a few times myself, and liked it. I think the lateral tubes make for better bracing and more stiffness in the horizontal plane, giving the bike better pedal response. The lack of a top tube allows for more flex in the vertical plane, giving the rider better comfort. I thought it was the best of both worlds - a nice mix of speed and comfort. If only they came in 531!

More recently, I bought wife #2 a Peugeot mixtie (yeah, short again), and it now resides with my daughter. I have a scheme to swap my Schwinn with her for the mixtie, and move all the components from my PX-10 over to the mixtie. Go ahead, call me crazy...
Somebody did make mixtes with Reynolds 531... British maker, possibly Mercian or Bob Jackson. They both still make a "step through" frame that resembles the mixte, and out of high quality tubing too.

Aaron
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Old 09-09-13, 08:09 PM
  #64  
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That's nice, but for my purposes, it has to be French. You know, funny threadings, odd sizes, and all that.
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Old 09-09-13, 08:18 PM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by wahoonc View Post
Somebody did make mixtes with Reynolds 531... British maker, possibly Mercian or Bob Jackson. They both still make a "step through" frame that resembles the mixte, and out of high quality tubing too.

Aaron
Kuwahara also made a top end mixte with lightweight Ishiwata tubes in the eighties... these were comparable to the 531 framed models and equally well built.
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Old 09-10-13, 03:45 AM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by Lazarus Short View Post
That's nice, but for my purposes, it has to be French. You know, funny threadings, odd sizes, and all that.
Peugeot made plenty of mixtes as did Gitane and Motobecane, but I have no clue which tubing sets they used.

Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver View Post
Kuwahara also made a top end mixte with lightweight Ishiwata tubes in the eighties... these were comparable to the 531 framed models and equally well built.
Always forget about the Japanese manufacturers....

Aaron
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Old 12-22-16, 09:26 PM
  #67  
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step-through downhill

step through Freespirit dinasty
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Old 12-22-16, 10:20 PM
  #68  
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ZOMBIEEEEE!

But since I'm responding anyhow, I've got no issue with step thrus, I've ridden a few in the past. Don't own any currently, but would have no issue buying and riding one.
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Old 12-23-16, 03:37 AM
  #69  
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Read half way through this before realizing its age...Anyway, I voted "Im a woman...don't ride a step-through", or whatever it was. I just don't much like how they look. I do like some mixtes, but I'm not sure I would ride them either...
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Old 12-23-16, 04:01 AM
  #70  
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Great old poll!

Men have always ridden step-thru's, women's bikes, or omafiets (grandma bike) in northern Europe and Asia and to some extent everywhere else except the US. Their use is also increasing. We live in four different places during the year, I have one opafiets (diamond, men's) and three omafiets (step-thru, women's). They all work equally as well.

Large Sizes: The largest Omafiets is usually a 61cm (Workcycles, etc.) but most have very long seat posts and can be ridden by anyone. I use to very often ride my wife's Omafiets by raising the seat about 7". We have a bunch of Omafiets for guests and even my 6'5" brother-in-law rides a 57cm with no problem or discomfort. From Workcycles there is also the Gr8, Fr8, and Kruis that will all fit the tallest of Dutch folks (Handmade City Bicycles).

The whole gender conflict thing in the US is interesting. People in Europe are quite different and massively less concerned about gender. Men have never had a problem with riding a bike sold as 'women's'. Men aren't afraid to be manly men or metros or raving queens (and a know a few who are all three depending on the time of day and where they are). Women aren't afraid to be women or to do manly things and don't feel the need to demonstrate that they are women or to defend it or make a big deal about it or assert anything. The US is way to in to labeling and dividing people, especially the past 5 or so years, based on profession, skin color, what's between their legs, and what they want between their partners legs.
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Old 12-23-16, 04:42 AM
  #71  
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Originally Posted by vol View Post
This should be a fun poll, as some people say bikes with step-through frame is "girly" , while others say in the Netherlands men ride step-through. But I do have seen plenty of women riding "men's bike" with horizontal top tube. What makes you prefer one to the other?
Riding an oma, the step through design from 1911 with the crescent upper tube, is certainly not girly. It's a bit like a comfy chair in the sense that people will find their own preferred sitting position, it allows for all kind of riding postures and males tend to find a very masculine one, and some women a very feminine one.

Especially for young males it's also cool not to give a damn about what they ride and there are plenty of cheap old oma's around and they're one size fit's all, 57cm and 28". And one can carry two girls on them. Fathers also prefer oma's because a step through is very practical when transporting 2 or 3 kids, it's much easier to get on and off while keeping it stable an not kicking the offspring in the head.

I've used them a lot, but I prefer a taller bike with a top tube. I'm 6ft4 and 195 lbs and that's too much for the standard oma, I can raise the saddle but then it looses it's main attraction which is the very upright position, the handle bars won't raise enough. And allthough the oma is quite rigid for a step through, it's too wobbly for my size, and all the energy wasted on flexing the frame is making 20 km/h very hard work. At lower speeds it's fine, but above a certain power output it just isn't strong enough to be efficient. There are step throughs with wide aluminium tubes on the market now, both oma and the double swan neck, appearently aimed at young parents. Maybe they are more rigid, didn't try one of them yet.
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Old 12-24-16, 06:13 AM
  #72  
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I have always thought of the step-through frame as girly. To me it evokes a sense of riding around leisurely at 8 mph with a small dog in the front basket or a Citibike.
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Old 12-24-16, 06:50 AM
  #73  
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Originally Posted by damulta View Post
I am a man, and I ride a step-through bike....

Altho I might change to a mens bike by force....

Example I went to the local bike store, and was having a look around. When I asked if a model had a low bar ver of it I was hit by that's for women... Then I went to say the only difference I'm aware of is weight of the bike, and I really don't care they are easier to ride. I was givin the crazy look, and this has made me change my view on continuing to ride a step through.

It's a shame I say cause us men have more to worry about having a tube so close to the gold above....
That is the kind of elitist attitude that drives me crazy. I was looking at a mountain bike at our LBS. I wanted a Mountain bike because that is what I use as a daily ride. The sales person tried to steer me away from a MTB because I ride it on cement. I like mountain bikes and ride them on whatever I want to. The customer is always right. Go over his head. Tell his boss he needs to be educated about step thru's and see if there is a more understanding bike store down the road.
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Old 12-24-16, 05:24 PM
  #74  
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Step-through for winter; otherwise, no. It makes my first few spring rides interesting when I forget to swing my leg over to dismount.

For winter it's just more convenient, with heavy clothes and heavy boots. I've also had better luck finding cheap but quality used MTBs in my size in a step-through or women-specific design.

For road biking, I'm not a fan of step-through, and for commuting, I actually find that step-through frames create more difficulties with skirts that go any lower than mid-thigh. (Yes, I'm a lady kitty, and yes, I wear cycling shorts or modesty shorts under my skirts!)
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Old 12-24-16, 05:38 PM
  #75  
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At 6'1"/250+, I need ruggedness to start with, and it is pretty much factual that the mens' double-diamond is structurally stronger (how much is open to debate from armchair metallurgists).

The other night, out of curiosity, I looked through some mixte examples, and I'm not averse to the idea. Sprung seat, though, to handle the low back/"arthur", and baby-ape bar to take the pressure off the upper body. 700x44 minimum tires.....
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