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transition to road cycling.....

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transition to road cycling.....

Old 06-12-11, 08:35 PM
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scale
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transition to road cycling.....

well after about 2 years..maybe 3 now...im hooked.

I currently have a batch of spring knee syndrome after a brutal winter. I decided to destroy my knees (overuse) my first few times out and now im paying the price.

I never learn and i seem to do this every year.

anyway.....up till now ive ridden in shimano MTB shoes (SPD SH-M181L) and shimano double sided spd mtb pedals.

Is there any advantage to switching to LOOK style or the shimano road standard (whatever it is called)?

OVer use aside im wondering if it may help with my knee issues. My knees tend to get hot...almost like a friction heat...when riding. THen they ache......

It isnt the inside or outside of the knee....but the whole knee. I need to go ask the doctor about it or get a referal and see what the heck it is.

Just wondering if the larger surface area of the cleats might help secure things better or assist......or if there is any other reason to switch other than right now im sure it looks weird that i have spd mtb pedals and shoes on my road bike.
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Old 06-13-11, 11:13 AM
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Bob N.
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Sounds like you might have a "fit" issue. Is your saddle at the correct height? If it is, your leg should be almost straight with your heel on the pedal and the crank at 6 o'clock.

Do some checking in that department. Maybe your LBS can help
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Old 06-13-11, 01:20 PM
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Also sounds like you are mashing the gears rather than spinning in an easier gear.
Get pedal/cleats with a little bit of float (mention at the LBS when buying pedals). Your knees will thank you.
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Old 06-13-11, 07:03 PM
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Originally Posted by scale View Post
... right now im sure it looks weird that i have spd mtb pedals and shoes on my road bike.
If you think anybody notices this, or cares, or if YOU care that they might, you're taking yourself too seriously. I've been riding more than 40 years, and the only time I can remember noticing anybody's pedals is when clipless was new and I asked somebody to show me how his pedals worked.
Seems to me a better idea to find out what's going on with your knees rather than just throwing money at them. If it's not a fit issue, as the other post suggests, why not get a real diagnosis? There's no assurance you need to be locked down tight rather than having a little float--I think you're as likely to go in the wrong direction as the right one.
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Old 06-14-11, 06:31 PM
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I'm inclined to agree... Sounds like you're over flexing your knees (saddle too low and/or too far forward) and/or trying to churn big gears instead of spinning.

If you have the availability (and insurance) go to a proper ortho or sports-medicine doc and get a diagnosis. And get either a fitting or have someone who is knowledgeable check your riding position.
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Old 06-14-11, 07:39 PM
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i dropped my seat a couple about an inch and a half and have been riding the rollers. Seems to be helping things along. I wasnt fully extended and im surely not now and the pain wasnt in the back of my knee only as some suggest when a saddle is too high. I want rocking either...

with my seat down ...if anyting i feel too far forward now. IM going to give it a few more days of 20 minute sessions on the rollers and see how i feel

I agree and would love to go see a sports med person etc. My insurance stinks..2500 deductable per year. THe year resets in august so thats my plan.....wait until i can get the big window back.
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Old 06-16-11, 05:14 AM
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Unclear: Difficult To Diagnose

Originally Posted by scale View Post
i dropped my seat a couple about an inch and a half and have been riding the rollers. Seems to be helping things along. I wasnt fully extended and im surely not now and the pain wasnt in the back of my knee only as some suggest when a saddle is too high. I want rocking either...

with my seat down ...if anyting i feel too far forward now. IM going to give it a few more days of 20 minute sessions on the rollers and see how i feel

I agree and would love to go see a sports med person etc. My insurance stinks..2500 deductable per year. THe year resets in august so thats my plan.....wait until i can get the big window back.
When you say "ride the rollers", are you saying that you are riding outdoor rolling hills near your home? Or is it indoors, on a set of rollers?

You really need to have an experienced rider/technician look at your fit objectively. If you weren't previously extending fully, and now have lowered the seat - this won't accomplish a traditionally-correct fit. Fore-aft positioning of the saddle to pedal relationship has some generally accepted "rules", too, although these are only general starting points. You need to have someone you can trust to put your bike on a stationary trainer and watch you ride, make adjustments, ask questions, observe, adjust, and then have you ride outdoors to see what the changes have accomplished.

Is there a bike store or a coop near you that you trust?

Phil G.
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Old 06-16-11, 05:40 AM
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scale
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rollers.......indoor rollers.

THere are a few places that do fittings around the metro here starting at about $250. Ive never dealt with those shops in the past.....no idea on trust. Ive been looking into reviews but bike fitting reviews are hard to find.

Id like to go and get opinions though
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Old 06-16-11, 09:33 AM
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Lacking a pro fitting session (which can be pricey as you note), the old "standard wisdom" would have the saddle height such that the leg is not quite fully extended at the bottom of the downstroke.
The saddle fore-and-aft position affects this directly and is often either neglected or ignored. Again, the "ballpark" measurement is to sit the bike properly with the pedals level, at the 3 and 9 O'clock position. Have someone drop a plumb line from the bony process just below your kneecap. This should intersect the center of the pedal axle. Make sure you're sitting on the seat properly when you do this, with your "sit bones" on the most-padded part of the saddle.
These measurements will get you in the ballpark, they served generations of riders well before the invention of dedicated "fit" devices.

Again, the old standard wisdom is that pain behind the knee indicates over extension... Saddle too high or too far back, and pain in front, around the kneecap, indicates the saddle too low/far forward, which causes hyperflexion.
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Old 06-16-11, 03:09 PM
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Go to the shop where you bought your bike or a good neighborhood shop and ask them to do a fitting. Should be free of maybe $25 tops.
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