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Presta valves?

Old 07-13-11, 11:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Kayce
presta valves hold air much better, and dont arent effected by weathering/ corrosion.
They also break when pulling off your pump in a hurry.
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Old 07-13-11, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Looigi
Yes. This is the problem. When you take the head off, you invariably lose some air reducing the pressure an unknown amount.
You also loose pressure when screwing down the presta valve head
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Old 07-13-11, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by bykemike
A response from a guy that owns an AC company:

Cyccommute, despite the high tech look of the 134a gauge set and ends in your picture, under the access ports on the system sits a common schrader valves. The end fittings are just a safeguard to insure the proper refrigerent is being used.

Mike
Given what you've said, it looks like the Schrader valve shouldn't be used for this kind of application. You certainly wouldn't find it in a laboratory setting.

Originally Posted by Skankingbiker
They also break when pulling off your pump in a hurry.
And Schrader valves are vulnerable to stem cuts

Originally Posted by Skankingbiker
You also loose pressure when screwing down the presta valve head
Only if you don't know what you are doing. Don't press down on the valve stem and you won't lose air. That's the beauty of the presta valve.
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Old 07-13-11, 02:34 PM
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Size on small diameter tubes as well as the ability to deal with high pressures. Schraders will depress at high speeds and deflate a tire not to mention spring breakage and fatigue. I landspeed race motorcycles and metal valve stem caps with o-ring seals are required to prevent rapid air loss oin schraders. Can't pass tech w/o 'em.
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Old 07-14-11, 04:25 AM
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+1 on that XR2. I have a BMW motorcycle and they come with "O" ring valve caps standard. BMW says schrader valves at high speed will lose air without the cap seals.

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Old 07-14-11, 05:31 AM
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The Dunlop Valve. That's the valve for me.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunlop_valve
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Old 07-14-11, 08:36 AM
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Originally Posted by XR2
Size on small diameter tubes as well as the ability to deal with high pressures. Schraders will depress at high speeds and deflate a tire not to mention spring breakage and fatigue. I landspeed race motorcycles and metal valve stem caps with o-ring seals are required to prevent rapid air loss oin schraders. Can't pass tech w/o 'em.
I recall reading that John Howard had that problem when attempting to set the world motor paced record in the mid 80s. Presta's wouldn't do that unless the stem wasn't screwed down.

On a side note: The nut on top of the presta stem serves a purpose. I've broken that nut off in the past...it happens...and the stem will hold air. But if you tap the stem, you get a wonderful demonstration of the Bernoulli effect. The air comes rushing out and the stem is sucked back into the tube.
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Old 07-14-11, 02:02 PM
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Originally Posted by prathmann
But, OTOH, the Presta valve requires that you unscrew the locknut and 'burp' the valve.
Did not know that, learn something new everyday.
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Old 07-14-11, 02:45 PM
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The air-sprung shocks on my FS MTB both use Schrader valves. The rear shock is supposed to be at something like 180 psi, too.
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Old 07-14-11, 02:53 PM
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Oops...should have read all the posts before opening my mouth, or keyboard.

Never mind.
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Old 07-14-11, 02:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Brian T.
Did not know that, learn something new everyday.
If you don't do that, the pump pressure may not depress the valve enough to allow air to pass into the tube. But it doesn't necessarily happen all the time, at least in my experience. But the best way to be sure is to "burp" first.
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Old 07-15-11, 06:35 AM
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Hydrolastic suspensions on some BMC cars (Minis, Austin Americas, etc..) use schraeder valves to fill them and evacuate the system. They are filled with a water/alcohol mix and operate at about 220 PSI.
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Old 07-15-11, 08:03 AM
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swap them for schrader and move on
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Old 07-15-11, 08:35 AM
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Originally Posted by BarracksSi
The air-sprung shocks on my FS MTB both use Schrader valves. The rear shock is supposed to be at something like 180 psi, too.
Yes, Schrader valves can hold pressure. They are used for all kinds of applications. However, using them in a laboratory setting isn't one of them. Prathman was just plain wrong on that count. The last thing you want when a reactor is filled with flammable or corrosive or poisonous or high pressure or a combination of all these, is a spring activated valve that can be opened by simply depressing the valve core. You don't fill reactors with flammable, corrosive poisonous gas using a pressure activated air chuck either. It would be a good way of ending up dead.

Laboratory and industrial pressure systems with any kind of hazard associated with them do not use Schrader valves. Nor, for that matter, do they use Presta valves. They use hard plumbed systems fitted with entirely different valves and control systems.
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Old 07-15-11, 08:53 AM
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With a presta valve you can blow a little air into the tube before you tuck it up inside the tire. With a schrader valve you'd have to use a pump for this, wasting an entire 4 1/2 seconds.
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Old 07-15-11, 09:25 PM
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So I guess I'm the only person on the planet that uses the little $2 presta adapters that make it so easy to fill the tube.
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Old 07-15-11, 09:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Guitarrick
With a presta valve you can blow a little air into the tube before you tuck it up inside the tire. With a schrader valve you'd have to use a pump for this, wasting an entire 4 1/2 seconds.
Uh....I can blow air into a schrader tube with my mouth. I depress the valve stem against the tip of my canine tooth. It's something I learned as a child.

So there dies another advantage of the presta system.
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Old 07-16-11, 08:11 AM
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Originally Posted by stonefree
So I guess I'm the only person on the planet that uses the little $2 presta adapters that make it so easy to fill the tube.
Nope. You aren't the only person to use the adapters.

But you may be the only person who thinks it makes it easier. If you use the presta valve properly, you close it after filling. That means taking the adapter off, loosening the stem screw, burping the valve, threading the adapter back on, attaching the pump chuck, pumping up the tire, taking the adapter off, closing the stem, and threading the adapter back on.

Why not just loosen the stem screw, burp the valve, put on the chuck, pump up the tire and tighten the stem. Easier. Less typing
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Old 07-16-11, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute
Yes, Schrader valves can hold pressure. They are used for all kinds of applications. However, using them in a laboratory setting isn't one of them. Prathman was just plain wrong on that count. The last thing you want when a reactor is filled with flammable or corrosive or poisonous or high pressure or a combination of all these, is a spring activated valve that can be opened by simply depressing the valve core. You don't fill reactors with flammable, corrosive poisonous gas using a pressure activated air chuck either. It would be a good way of ending up dead.
Of course I never said that they would be used with either flammable or corrosive gasses. Just mentioned lab eqpt. that used high pressures and small volumes where even slight pressure losses would be a problem. Some of our lab eqpt. used them as part of an air shock system that needed pressure of around 200 psi.

The fact remains that Schrader valves are used in a wide variety of applications whereas I've only encountered Presta valves in bicycle tubes. They used to have a big advantage when used with handpumps many years ago that tended to lose lots of pressure when the hose was unscrewed from a Schrader valve whereas the Presta didn't have that problem. But modern pumps no longer have that issue with either valve type.

The only minor advantage I still see is that it's easier to roll up a tube for storage and get all the air out since with a Schrader valve I either need to press on the valve stem or loosen the valve core.
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Old 07-16-11, 09:41 AM
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All this bickering about one vs. the other is moot. Pumps work on both.

Finding a bike pump here in the US that works on Dunlop valves, though, is trickier.
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Old 07-16-11, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute
Nope. You aren't the only person to use the adapters.

But you may be the only person who thinks it makes it easier. If you use the presta valve properly, you close it after filling. That means taking the adapter off, loosening the stem screw, burping the valve, threading the adapter back on, attaching the pump chuck, pumping up the tire, taking the adapter off, closing the stem, and threading the adapter back on.

Why not just loosen the stem screw, burp the valve, put on the chuck, pump up the tire and tighten the stem. Easier. Less typing
Ok, so maybe I'm a little green with the Presta valves, however, the procedure that I Googled shows no extra steps after opening the Presta valve and finger tightening the Presta adapter onto it (and not removing it). The adapter allows the valve to close automatically with no "burping" required and presents an opening to the user that is the exact size of a Shrader valve therefore allowing one to use any ordinary footpump or even high pressure gas station style pump (if you're fast enough) on said Presta valve with the valve closing automatically exactly like a Shrader valve. Even the bike guru on the net video recommends using the adapter as a valve cap if you prefer and I certainly do. So I guess I will remain the only person on the planet that uses the adapter in the correct manner so that it's makes my life a little easier when I'm filling up my 700x23cm tubes. The link is on my other laptop, and I will post it eventually if that would contribute to anyone's happiness. Have a nice day.
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Old 07-16-11, 11:16 AM
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I wouldn't leave an adapter on a Presta valve, but that's just because I'd rather screw it shut instead of rely on air pressure to keep it shut.

Still, I carry one in the seat bag in case I want to refill someplace where they have an air hose with a Schrader chuck.
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Old 07-16-11, 01:13 PM
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How about the differences between long and short stem presta valves? Tried to fill my tires this morning and the damn valve stem shot out. One quick whoosh.

I had one of each and< and personally, I think the short one was easier to fill.
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Old 07-16-11, 05:45 PM
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Originally Posted by prathmann
Of course I never said that they would be used with either flammable or corrosive gasses. Just mentioned lab eqpt. that used high pressures and small volumes where even slight pressure losses would be a problem. Some of our lab eqpt. used them as part of an air shock system that needed pressure of around 200 psi.
What I objected to was the blanket statement "where small air losses are critical such as high-pressure lab equipment." I would not consider an air shock to be a piece of 'high pressure laboratory equipment'. A Schrader valve is used in that application because the shock is likely produced by an automotive or airplane company and they work with what they are familiar. Just like the air conditioner industry.

Pressure vessels - I mean ones that contain very high pressures at high temperatures - are a very different beast all together.
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Old 07-16-11, 06:00 PM
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Originally Posted by stonefree
Ok, so maybe I'm a little green with the Presta valves, however, the procedure that I Googled shows no extra steps after opening the Presta valve and finger tightening the Presta adapter onto it (and not removing it). The adapter allows the valve to close automatically with no "burping" required and presents an opening to the user that is the exact size of a Shrader valve therefore allowing one to use any ordinary footpump or even high pressure gas station style pump (if you're fast enough) on said Presta valve with the valve closing automatically exactly like a Shrader valve. Even the bike guru on the net video recommends using the adapter as a valve cap if you prefer and I certainly do. So I guess I will remain the only person on the planet that uses the adapter in the correct manner so that it's makes my life a little easier when I'm filling up my 700x23cm tubes. The link is on my other laptop, and I will post it eventually if that would contribute to anyone's happiness. Have a nice day.
The 'burp' used for a presta valve is it loosen the valve within the stem. It's done because the valve can stick closed from the pressure from within the tube that holds the valve closed. When you use a schrader chuck on the valve, like a gas station pump, all you are doing is depressing the valve stem to let the air in. With a schrader valve you have to hold the valve open to get air in. Well...you don't have but you'll need around 25 psi over the pressure inside the tire to open the valve.

But that depression of the stem lets air out too. The beauty of the presta valve is that it closes when the pressure inside the tire is equal to the pressure on the stem. There's no release of air when the tire is pumped up. You don't have to hold the valve open because it opens on its own. When you remove the chuck, there's a whoosh of air but that whoosh is only the air in the pump line.

I too close the presta valve like BarracksSi after filling so as not to release air with an inadvertent depression of the stem. I don't, however, carry an adapter because I carry a pump on my bike wherever I go. Far too often, I have flats where I have to fill the tube without the aid of a compressor.
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