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Your ideal grocery getter urban utility bike

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Your ideal grocery getter urban utility bike

Old 11-20-04, 05:09 PM
  #1  
Nightshade
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Your ideal grocery getter urban utility bike

Here's your chance to "build" the Ideal all purpose utility
bike to replace your car(s) for your day to day grocery hops,
tips to the bank or general running around that you now use
a car for.

What kind of bike would it be?

What kind of gearing (internal or derailers)?

How many gears?

What kind of bars?

Will you use bags or baskets?

And so on and so forth? Since no real money will be spent
let your imagination run. The goal is to "build" a bullet
proof city utility bike that will go anywhere,do anyting
in the way of getting most, if not all, of your city chores
done,including commuting if you wish.

Let the fun begin!!!!!!!!
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Old 11-20-04, 06:29 PM
  #2  
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I would think a trike with rear suspention (so it could lean) and a fully inclosed basket big enough for 4 or 5 bags of groceries and a cloths rack.

But I would never expect one bike to do it all....and whereI live I don't ask any bike to do any of it. if it dosent fit in a messinger bag I don't take it or get it on my bike. My bikes are 'front of the pack' bikes.
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Old 11-20-04, 06:43 PM
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This isn't ideal, but one of my bikes is an old schwinn five speed cruiser with sidepull brakes, 2.125 tires and a big basket up front for shopping/utility/barhopping. works great. Used it to commute often for 10-12 miles RT and never felt at a disadvantage. Sometimes pass roadies with it. Fun bike. I'd add a split basket in back if I could find one cheap.

Saw an old cruiser frame at the grocery store (outside!) that had nexus hubs w internal brake front and back, semislicks, and a BOB trailer. it was pretty sweet.
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Old 11-20-04, 07:10 PM
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Two wire carriers at the back (the sort that fits a large grocery bag), plus bungee cords on top of that to fasten bulky things that won't get damaged by bungee cords. At the front one of those large flattish baskets that bicycle delivery people used in the 40s, and maybe a couple of low-mounted front panniers if you're planning a really big shop. Having said that I once bungee corded a flat of overripe strawberries on top of my wire carriers, and got most of them home intact. Don't think the gearing matters as much as the fact that the bike has to look cheap and well beaten up, so an opportunist thief doesn't decide to take it home. I suppose a trailer would be an option too, though I've never ridden with one, and wouldn't know where to store it anyway.
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Old 11-20-04, 07:18 PM
  #5  
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Walmart beater, back rack, garage sale kid trailer, biggest bright yellow backpack I could find, front basket, big case hardened padlock and cable...

But, take off your dayglo HiVis vest when you go in the store, or everybody thinks you work where you are shopping,

I'm thinking about a front rack and low panniers for the front, and we bought a rack and panniers for my partner. Two bikes are better than one!!
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Old 11-20-04, 07:30 PM
  #6  
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I put a rear rack on my Fuji Sagres and then I took a couple of cat litter buckets that used to have 35 lbs. of cat litter in them. I attached a couple of rope hooks with fender washer and just hook them on the rack with a bungi to hold them down.

Today I carried a 15 lb. turkey another 15 lbs. of veggeis and fruit, 4 lbs,. of butter and margerine various herbs and spices so on and so forth but really a pretty good load of groceries. Enough to last my wife and I a week is my normal load. I even got a compliment in front of the store when someone watched me load up my improvised panniers. Not counting the cost of cat litter it cost about $3 including the contact paper I used to cover it.
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Old 11-20-04, 08:12 PM
  #7  
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I've got a trailer. Looks like a rubbermaid bin on wheels. Get to the grocery, detatch it from the bike, wheel it in, fill it up, pay, wheel it out, stick it back on the bike. Can't think of anything better. Can haul a week's worth of groceries, or a fifty pound bag of dog food (big dog).
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Old 11-20-04, 08:23 PM
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A road frame, possibly with wider wheels, with drop bars, and baskets on the front/rear, possibly with a trailer if I needed to carry a lot.
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Old 11-20-04, 08:37 PM
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I use my old 12 speed Bianchi Victoria road bike that I converted to a 16 speed with Nashbar multi position ATB handle bar and XT shifter brake lever set. Using a inline rack and a old style paniers that clips onto it. I even have a kickstand. The best for the store and chores.
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Old 11-20-04, 09:37 PM
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http://www.bikeforums.net/attachment...chmentid=11758


Shiman Nexus internal 7 speed
Partial chaincase
Full fenders
drum brakes front and rear
Shimano hub dynamo (old bottle dynamo is disconnected, but has not yet been removed)
Lumotec halogen headlight
B&M LED taillight
rear rack
Schwalbe Marathon Plus for summer
Nokian Hakapilita 106 (carbide studs) for winter

There is an InStep Turbo Trailer for taking my daughter to school and carrying bulky stuff.

Had the trailer attached all last summer; took my daughter to day camp every day on the way to work
(about a 14 mile round trip). We also have some favorite restaurants in an area where car parking spaces are extremely scarce. For all these reasons, a trailer is nice.

Paul
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Old 11-24-04, 03:27 PM
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I think I've already got what I think is ideal in a grocery getter. Decent touring bike, fitted out with heavy-duty racks front and rear. Large (Arkel) panniers. And a Burley cargo trailer.

Decent speed with this bike, despite its load-bearing ability. And this setup is capable of carrying perhaps 175 pounds of cargo, including what can be carried in the trailer, and not including the substantial bulk of its rider.

Sometimes I ride ten miles each way to go shopping; a rideable bike is a necessary condition of shopping this way.
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Old 11-25-04, 04:56 AM
  #12  
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I dont think there is any need to build a bike over 30lbs for utility riding, you will need to carry the bike up steps at some point. I see a lot of small women in my city riding huge, heavy utility bikes, whilst big guys zip past on ultra-light, compact frame MTBs.
I think the ultimate utility bike would have 8spd hub gears and front hub dynamo, MTB rims with slicks, lightweight touring-grade frame. A standard rear rack for panniers and a wicker basket in the front. Wicker is a fantastic material, very light weight and long-lasting. Im in 2 minds as to a kick-stand, but if you have to have one, use a braze-on for the pivot.

Mike Burrows (Giant designer) built some prototype city bikes using carbon frames with enclosed chains, and wheel axles supported on one side only so you can fix punctures without removing the wheel.

UK company Orbit also make some neat city bikes
http://www.orbit-cycles.co.uk/orion3.shtml
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Old 11-25-04, 06:09 AM
  #13  
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A recumbent trike with a Rohloff 14 speed rear hub and drum brakes, a modern dynamo light set ie. Lumotec, rear rack and pannier bag set or if in wetter areas a fully enclose velomobile such as a Cabbike (may be to heavy in very hilly areas). With the trike you get a simple drive train massive cargo capacity and a safer riding platform and with the Rohloff hub a big price.
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Old 11-25-04, 10:53 AM
  #14  
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http://www.bikesutra.com/rr_30_24_le_toy.html

-with a pink plastic basket wired to the handlebars.

Urban\vert\pipe\grocery-getter.
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Old 11-25-04, 11:19 AM
  #15  
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The Rohloff is a nice option in hillier cities. I'd query the practicality of a recumbent trike as a short-range utility bike:
you are never going to take advantage of the improved aerodynamics
you cant see over traffic
they are more difficult to haul up stairs and steps and to store in city-type accomodation
You can't park them against a local shop on a narrow pavement without blocking the pavement
you can't hop across curbs
the luggage is at a much lower level so you have to bend down
You are at splash-level for passing cars.

Recumbents belong on the open road for longer, fast commutes.
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Old 11-25-04, 07:12 PM
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Whatever bike I have my rack on that week
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Old 11-26-04, 05:48 AM
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Trikes aren't everyones cup of tea, some can't get used to the low riding level and don't feel safe in traffic. I actually prefer a trike in traffic (I live in a small capital city).
I use my trike in the city for short errand runs as well as for exercise on more open routes still in the city and suburban area.
I live in the roaring 40's so the aero improvement often helps a lot no matter how short a run (you get to ride past people walking thier bikes into the wind).
A folding trike helps with storage but carrying it up stairs would be a pain.
I haven't had any drama parking but it could be an issue on narrow paths, curb hopping isn't much of an issue as every curb in my city has ramps both ends of each block and a lot have them in the middle as well.
I think I would prefer to lean down to load the trike as it keeps the cg. low as opposed to the load being higher.
Pulling up at a set of lights and not having to unclip and balance a load is hard to beat.
I have carried for ~5 km, 40 kg on the rear rack of my Gt3 and another 20 kg in my lap at the same time due to an unplanned occurence.
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Old 11-26-04, 07:11 AM
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Originally Posted by jhg152
Two wire carriers at the back (the sort that fits a large grocery bag), plus bungee cords on top of that to fasten bulky things that won't get damaged by bungee cords. At the front one of those large flattish baskets that bicycle delivery people used in the 40s, and maybe a couple of low-mounted

One like this?



I was seriously contemplating purchasing one for the ultimate winter ride. Figured I could stash some amazing DIY light in that front basket and the rears would hold all kinds of foul weather gear.

Alas, dreams torpedo'd by the necessity of financially bailing out the grown kids again.
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Old 11-26-04, 07:34 AM
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Originally Posted by dobber
One like this?



I was seriously contemplating purchasing one for the ultimate winter ride. Figured I could stash some amazing DIY light in that front basket and the rears would hold all kinds of foul weather gear.

Alas, dreams torpedo'd by the necessity of financially bailing out the grown kids again.
You know, the old 1950s cruser bikes might not be bad if the terrain is fairly flat. Highly reliable, low maintenance, flat resistant, chainguard, fenders. From a standpoint of practical, short distance transportation, the "ten-speed revolution" of the 1970s was a step back -- bikes became much faster, but less useful. When I was a kid, I'd go on long (16 mile RT) trips in hilly country, even though the bike probably outweighed me. Rode in snow a lot -- never thought twice about it. Not that I want to give up my seven speed hub and aluminum frame, but this is how much of the world commutes.

Paul
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Old 11-26-04, 09:16 AM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by PaulH
You know, the old 1950s cruser bikes might not be bad if the terrain is fairly flat. Highly reliable, low maintenance, flat resistant, chainguard, fenders. From a standpoint of practical, short distance transportation, the "ten-speed revolution" of the 1970s was a step back -- bikes became much faster, but less useful. When I was a kid, I'd go on long (16 mile RT) trips in hilly country, even though the bike probably outweighed me. Rode in snow a lot -- never thought twice about it. Not that I want to give up my seven speed hub and aluminum frame, but this is how much of the world commutes.

Paul
The bike in the photo is a "Worksman" that can be bought with
the baskets shown. Worksman are without a doubt the ultimate
utility bikes as that's all they are built for. They are
heavy, slow and oh so dependable. However, many other bikes
will do the same work it's just that when they other bikes
are broken worn out hulks the Worksman will still be very
usable.

To me they are the best utility bicycles on the planet.
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Old 11-26-04, 01:04 PM
  #21  
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Merlin Newsboy with full XTR and hydraulic disc brakes.
 
Old 11-26-04, 05:16 PM
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This is a bike taxi but it could be converted into an Urban utility grocery getter

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Old 11-28-04, 11:27 AM
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Whatever it is, it should include an xtracycle. It is the ultimate.
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Old 11-28-04, 02:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Poguemahone
I've got a trailer. Looks like a rubbermaid bin on wheels. Get to the grocery, detatch it from the bike, wheel it in, fill it up, pay, wheel it out, stick it back on the bike. Can't think of anything better. Can haul a week's worth of groceries, or a fifty pound bag of dog food (big dog).
Do you have a picture that you can share?
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Old 11-28-04, 03:44 PM
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[QUOTE=Tightwad]Here's your chance to "build" the Ideal all purpose utility
bike to replace your car(s) for your day to day grocery hops,
tips to the bank or general running around that you now use
a car for.

What kind of bike would it be?

hybrid mountain/road (1" tire width, and a nice 80 or 100mm fork would do wonders on a crappy road)

What kind of gearing (internal or derailers)? Internal, via 14-sp rohloff

How many gears? 14

What kind of bars? Answer Pro-Taper (I own one and am very satisfied)

Will you use bags or baskets? (rear rack with large panniers, rack would also be attatched viw extender mounts so it sits about 3" farther back than normal, for foot clearance's sake.)

basically think and nice XC mountain bike, put slick skinnies on it, gut the drivetrain, replace it with a rohloff hub, and mount a custom rack mount to it....that's it. I'm not a very picky guy when it comes to utility
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