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Best way to transport a 2nd bike while riding?

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Best way to transport a 2nd bike while riding?

Old 11-25-04, 08:38 AM
  #1  
koan
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Best way to transport a 2nd bike while riding?

Often I find that I need to transport a bike, but I don't use cars/buses unless it's life and death. What's the best way to carry a bike while you're biking yourself? I've thought about trail-a-bike setups, i.e. taking the front wheel off the extra bike and attaching the fork to the rack/rear axle/seatpost of the bike you're riding, but haven't figured out something that works. Strapping the 2nd bike to your back seems a bit dangerous (and uncomfortable), since the front wheel on the 2nd bike will just flop around. Any other ideas?

A bike messenger told me he carried 4 bikes once -- two on the handlebars, one on the top tube, and one across his back -- but I don't have near that kind of balance.
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Old 11-25-04, 09:14 AM
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Hold it to the side while you ride with it, obviously doesn't work for large distances. If you take the front wheel off you can slide the frame over your head and then figure out some way of strapping the wheel to your back as well, or strap it to a rack.
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Old 11-25-04, 09:16 AM
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Hold the stem and let it run next to you. Dont ride fast as stopping can be tricky, but stopping will be easier if you lower your seatpost.
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Old 11-25-04, 10:14 AM
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Originally Posted by koan
A bike messenger told me he carried 4 bikes once -- two on the handlebars, one on the top tube, and one across his back -- but I don't have near that kind of balance.
I'm thinking the bike messenger had plenty of room for bicycles because he wasn't overly burdened with scruples about speaking only the truth.
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Old 11-25-04, 10:38 AM
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Enterprising ****stanis apparently ride over to China, pick up a bike, strap it to the side of their own bike using bits of broomhandle and ride the resultant 4-wheeler back home to sell.
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Old 11-25-04, 12:56 PM
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Is there such thing of a bike rack for a bike? if not, then there should be.
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Old 11-25-04, 01:40 PM
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I'd just ride the bike and walk back.
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Old 11-25-04, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by operator
If you take the front wheel off you can slide the frame over your head and then figure out some way of strapping the wheel to your back as well, or strap it to a rack.
You mean have your head inside the main triangle? I tried riding with a bare frame over one shoulder like a courier bag, but it started bruising my collarbone and it was only 4-5 lbs. I'm thinking of transporting a bike over 10-30 km distances, so the bike I'm riding would have to bear the weight of the 2nd bike. I couldn't carry it on my body that long.

As for holding the stem of the other bike and rolling it beside you, really makes it hard to turn or change gears.


Originally Posted by Moonshot
I'd just ride the bike and walk back.
Walk-ing? Oh no, my legs are trained to go in circles, not forward and back =) And sometimes the bike I want to transport isn't rideable/needs repair, and I'm trying to take it to a bike shop.
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Old 11-25-04, 04:44 PM
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"As for holding the stem of the other bike and rolling it beside you, really makes it hard to turn or change gears "

You dont have to change gears, but it is faster and easier than walking. Turning can be done with one hand - you just have to remember to keep both bikes turning together. After a few hundred yards it comes pretty easy. With the seat lower it is easier to put your foot down when you stop.

If you try putting the frame over your shoulder, you will need padding. Water pipe insulating foam might do. It would be lighter if you took both wheels off and put them on your rack.
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Old 11-25-04, 07:14 PM
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Riding with a bike alongside with a hand on the stem is a good way to go if you understand the dangers involved. I'm speaking from personal experience in delivering hire bikes around my city for a couple of years.

Braking is one of them... it takes longer to pull up because of the added rolling weight and that weight doesn't have a brake option of its own. There is a good chance the handlebars will engage with each other; if this happens disaster is looming. It is most likely to happen going around corners. Indeed, you will need to perfect the going-around-corners technique to stop the towed bike from ducking under the one you're riding. And you will have to work out gearing, although if you use your left hand to tow the bike, you have the shifter for the rear cluster available for a broader range of shifts. Your towed bike should be on the traffic side of the bike you are riding. Gutters and poles tend to get a bit too close for comfort the other way around.

A far more efficient and safer way is to either fabricate a front fork clamp and attach it to the rear rack of your tugbike. Place the front wheel against the frame of the towed bike and attach with string or something. Of course, this becomes problematic with a fixed gear bike because the pedals keep turning. Hmmm.

You could also do what I have done and build up a two-wheel trailer with fabricated dropout clamp(s) that let you tow two, three or more bikes at once (I've had four on it, but it becomes hard work uphill).
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Old 11-26-04, 01:15 AM
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Bikes at Work has an accessory for one of their trailers, that alows one to transport two bikes.
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Old 11-26-04, 05:54 PM
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I've seen a pack that a bike can be loaded onto after breaking it down at Montizuma's Revenge.
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Old 11-27-04, 02:35 AM
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A few ideas.

1. For a relatively short distance, use nylon straps and attached the transported bike to the side of your bike rack, using nylon straps. I have done that quite often with a 20" bicycle.

2. Get the kind of "front hub" adaptor that is used to attach bicycle forks onto a Yakima rack. Fix that adaptor somewhere on your rack.
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