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Cycling in the Flatlands

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Cycling in the Flatlands

Old 01-30-12, 08:31 AM
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The nice thing about hilly terrain is the variety and obtaining shelter from the wind. As vertically challenged as I am, there have been rides where I crave a good hill because it will get me out of a gail-force (or so it felt) headwind.
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Old 01-30-12, 08:40 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by SlimRider
It has been purported that both Florida and Louisiana are the two flatest states of the United States. If this is true, why aren't any cities of these two states ever nominated as one of the most bicycle-friendly cities, within the USA?

You would think that if the topography and the geography of a city facilitates cycling, then there would quite naturally be more cycling, taking place within that city, by default.

What am I missing here?
I'll find out next month. I'll be down there riding in the warm sun --- as opposed to the cool temps, wind, and sun/clouds/rain mix we're having in ATL.
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Old 02-01-12, 08:46 PM
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The LAB seems to give high ratings to cities with lots of bike paths, even if the rest of their infrastructure is atrocious for cycling. My ideal city wouldn't need bike paths.
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Old 02-01-12, 09:12 PM
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Originally Posted by RonH
I'll find out next month. I'll be down there riding in the warm sun --- as opposed to the cool temps, wind, and sun/clouds/rain mix we're having in ATL.
Alright!

Have fun, Ron!

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Old 02-01-12, 09:40 PM
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And steel doesn't have chance in those warm, humid coastal states
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Old 02-01-12, 10:31 PM
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Originally Posted by rdtompki
And steel doesn't have chance in those warm, humid coastal states
There's more chromoly bikes in the Bay Area than you can shake a stick at!

Just Say'N...

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Old 02-01-12, 11:03 PM
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I've noticed a strong cycling based community in northeast Florida since I've lived here. I used to live in Naples Fl., but I hated cycling down there because, just as others have mentioned, there only appear to be strip malls, gated communities and golf courses, one after the other. Such a layout isn't conducive to cycling. Northeast Florida on the other hand, especially St. Johns county, seems in my opinion to be much more cyclist friendly. Don't get me wrong, we have our idiot drivers out here too and the occassional bicyclist hit and killed, but in general, I've noticed a more respectful group of drivers in the area. The more northern region of Florida tends to have less retirees, hence less elderly drivers on the road and less clueless senior citizens on the cycling and Rail Trail paths. I don't recall there ever being much of a cycling lane or path in New England, specifically MA. and NH., and the roads always seemed so extremely narrow that it was uncomfortable to ride up there. As for the flatness, heat, etc. Florida is flat, but it's still scenic in it's own rite. It doesn't sport the amazing mountain overlooks like other parts of the country, but hey, that's why people vacation, right? On the down side, (no pun intended), I have very little confidence riding down the backside of a mountain, even the small foothills of Skyline Dr. VA. As for the heat? You get use to it after awhile.
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Old 02-01-12, 11:09 PM
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Originally Posted by SlimRider
There's more chromoly bikes in the Bay Area than you can shake a stick at!

Just Say'N...

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And they aint goin' away lol
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Old 02-02-12, 08:38 AM
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Originally Posted by SlimRider
It has been purported that both Florida and Louisiana are the two flatest states of the United States. If this is true, why aren't any cities of these two states ever nominated as one of the most bicycle-friendly cities, within the USA?

You would think that if the topography and the geography of a city facilitates cycling, then there would quite naturally be more cycling, taking place within that city, by default.

What am I missing here?
I seek out hills. The challenge of going up a steep hill and then the payback are vital to me.

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Old 02-02-12, 12:34 PM
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Originally Posted by ka0use
colorado is the flatest state in the union. it's just a little.....horizontally challenged here and there.
as for the south- put a beer in the bottle cage, a confederate flag on a bicycle mast, have a shotgun in a scabbard mounted, those big bicycle tires from bike choppers, and knock out several teeth where the loss can easily be seen. you'll fit right in, maybe.
Riiight. NW New Mexico is quite the same. If you start from home, and return home, the whole trip is perfectly flat. On average.
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Old 02-02-12, 02:33 PM
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Drivers and roads.
and the culture .. CPH and AMS developed the infrastructure.

US has Concealed (and Open) Firearms Carry even when on bikes, instead.
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Old 02-02-12, 05:20 PM
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After a while flat gets boring. I'm ill suited to climbing, but rollers are a lot less boring than flat everywhere.

I can go for a ride where it is darn near dead flat, or I can do a training ride I used to do that was about 26 miles with less than 1/4 mile flat. Flat I can do riding out my front door. Id have to ride abotu 5 miles to that training ride. Or I can ride in the mountians and have a few thousand continous verticle feet of climbing over several miles.

MY choice. That is a lot more fun that flat and nothing but flat no matter what I feel like riding.
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Old 02-03-12, 08:32 AM
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Well Florida is not totally flat. We do have our overpasses!
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Old 02-03-12, 10:01 PM
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Originally Posted by CraigB
East central Illinois is also like that. I lived and rode there for 5 years and it was like being on a billiard table. Dull, dull, dull.
East of the Illinois river and west of it are flat along with the entire Chicago area. Then after Peoria it is flat, but that narrow section in between from I80 to Peoria along the river is pretty nice for central Illinois. Being stuck here for now isn't so bad and I have a lot of short 1/4 + mile hills that can go from 7-12%

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Old 02-03-12, 10:37 PM
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Bike friendly cities have more to do with the attitudes of the local government, business community, and population in general. Fargo, North Dakota is a Bike Friendly City that has developed many miles of bike trails and MUPs, designated bike lanes and passed city ordinances favoring bicycle commuting. It doesn't take long to figure it out driving downtown as every bike rack is full, even in the winter, the lanes are marked "Bicycles May Use Full Lane" and there are bike signs everywhere. Many businesses and housing units provide amentities for cyclists and the city has installed countless aestheticly pleasing but very secure bike racks. It is a very cool city in which to be a cyclist.
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Old 02-03-12, 11:07 PM
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Originally Posted by bobn
Well Florida is not totally flat. We do have our overpasses!
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Old 02-03-12, 11:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Myosmith
Bike friendly cities have more to do with the attitudes of the local government, business community, and population in general. Fargo, North Dakota is a Bike Friendly City that has developed many miles of bike trails and MUPs, designated bike lanes and passed city ordinances favoring bicycle commuting. It doesn't take long to figure it out driving downtown as every bike rack is full, even in the winter, the lanes are marked "Bicycles May Use Full Lane" and there are bike signs everywhere. Many businesses and housing units provide amentities for cyclists and the city has installed countless aestheticly pleasing but very secure bike racks. It is a very cool city in which to be a cyclist.
I do believe that I've heard of this once before...
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Old 02-04-12, 01:51 AM
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Only southern Louisiana is flat. As you head north, it gets somewhat hilly, but not very high.
Louisiana is far from bike friendly. Perhaps it has to do with the education level, the level of conservatism, or the inability to accept alternate ways of doing things. It is not uncommon to get yelled at, "get on the sidewalk where you belong," or to have the yahoos see how close they can come to you as they speed by.

When I think of Louisiana drivers and bicyclists, I think of "Deliverance."
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Old 02-04-12, 03:19 AM
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[QUOTE=Ecrevisse;13807523]Only southern Louisiana is flat. As you head north, it gets somewhat hilly, but not very high.
Louisiana is far from bike friendly. Perhaps it has to do with the education level, the level of conservatism, or the inability to accept alternate ways of doing things. It is not uncommon to get yelled at, "get on the sidewalk where you belong," or to have the yahoos see how close they can come to you as they speed by.

When I think of Louisiana drivers and bicyclists, I think of "Deliverance."[/QUOTE]

Damn! That's BAD!

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