Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

How do you feel about Camelbaks/Water backpacks?

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

How do you feel about Camelbaks/Water backpacks?

Old 03-22-12, 01:21 PM
  #1  
Crepes
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
How do you feel about Camelbaks/Water backpacks?

You know, those little backpacks you wear with the hose sticking out. I really love mine, but I know a lot of people don't particularly care for the things. Not having to mess with keep an actual bottle secure just seems so much better.
Crepes is offline  
Old 03-22-12, 01:25 PM
  #2  
Yo Spiff
Carpe Velo
 
Yo Spiff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 2,514

Bikes: 2000 Bianchi Veloce, '88 Trek 900, '88 Schwinn Prologue, '92 Schwinn Crosscut, '03 Diamondback Tandem, '94 Yokota Grizzly Peak

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I'll go make some popcorn so I can enjoy the show properly. This is the cycling version of the argument on the photography forums of whether or not to use a protective filter on a lens.

I like the convenience of a Camelbak. I drink more frequently from not having to fumble with the bottle.
Yo Spiff is offline  
Old 03-22-12, 01:50 PM
  #3  
Mr. Beanz
Banned.
 
Mr. Beanz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Upland Ca
Posts: 19,896

Bikes: Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Never had a problem handling bottles or keeping them secure.
Mr. Beanz is offline  
Old 03-22-12, 06:42 PM
  #4  
AlmostGreenGuy
Intrepid Bicycle Commuter
 
AlmostGreenGuy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 764

Bikes: Motobecane Grand Jubile, Austro Daimler 'Ultima', Salsa Vaya, Trek 4300, Fyxation Eastside, State Matte Black 6, '97 Trek 930 SHX, '93 Specialized Rockhopper

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 8 Posts
I use my Camelbak MULE for longer rides, but just use a couple of water bottles for commuting and shorter rides.
AlmostGreenGuy is offline  
Old 03-22-12, 10:45 PM
  #5  
shipwreck
Senior Member
 
shipwreck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1,475
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 139 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
In the winter, I might use my old MULE, with an extra insulating sleeve. It freezes slower than bottles.

In the summer, when doing an all day ride, then I like to put a bladder in a front bag. There are some long stretches without water here, and I go thru the water fast. But the back being covered is really irritating, thus the carrying it on the front. I tend to drink more often this way. Plus I can keep sports drinks in the bottles and drink them a little slower.



This is a bike with a two liter bag on the front, you can just see the tube. I ride older bikes with slightly slacker angles, don't know what that would do with the handling on a newer more aggressive bike.

Last edited by shipwreck; 03-22-12 at 10:51 PM.
shipwreck is offline  
Old 03-22-12, 11:18 PM
  #6  
mechBgon
Senior Member
 
mechBgon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 6,957
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
The insulating capabilities of my Camelbaks has been a plus in the summer. Ditto for their sheer water capacities. On long hot summer rides, I may take my Camelbak and three or more large waterbottles.


^ after the Midnight Century, 100% self-supported. No water stops, no food stops, no NOTHING out there in the farmland in the middle of the night. If you want it, you bring it yourself.

On long rides, my back and my seat feel the extra weight, though. Using up most of the water in the Camelbak before moving on to the bottles helps with that.

In the winter, hose freeze-up can be a problem when temps are significantly below freezing. My extended winter rides are on a bike with panniers, so I usually have one bottle in a cage and keep the rest in a pannier to slow down their cooling... ice-cold liquids in freezing temperatures are not ideal.
mechBgon is offline  
Old 03-22-12, 11:53 PM
  #7  
a1penguin
Senior Member
 
a1penguin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
Posts: 3,168
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 128 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
If your bottles aren't secure you are either using the wrong bottles or using the wrong cages. Bottles are easy; the camelback makes your back sweaty. Unless you need extra water, go with bottles.

There are plenty of threads about camelbacks and fredliness.

Now I'm ready for that popcorn.

Last edited by a1penguin; 03-23-12 at 01:24 AM.
a1penguin is offline  
Old 03-22-12, 11:58 PM
  #8  
ThermionicScott 
hungry
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 19,361

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers)

Mentioned: 81 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2449 Post(s)
Liked 350 Times in 255 Posts
I like popcorn, but it always makes me thirsty...
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 03-23-12, 12:06 AM
  #9  
mechBgon
Senior Member
 
mechBgon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 6,957
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
If you bottles aren't secure you are either using the wrong bottles or using the wrong cages.
...or maybe you're blitzing rock gardens at race pace on a mountain bike. I've lost stuff from jersey pockets that way, let alone bottle cages.

Bottles are easy; the camelback makes your back sweaty.
Dunno about anyone else, but simply riding makes my back sweaty Given a choice between 120F water from a bottle in the summer sun, or 75F water from a Camelbak, there's some perks to the Camelbak approach...
mechBgon is offline  
Old 03-23-12, 01:20 AM
  #10  
Digital_Cowboy
Senior Member
 
Digital_Cowboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Tampa/St. Pete, Florida
Posts: 9,355

Bikes: Specialized Hardrock Mountain (Stolen); Giant Seek 2 (Stolen); Diamondback Ascent mid 1980 - 1997

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Crepes View Post
You know, those little backpacks you wear with the hose sticking out. I really love mine, but I know a lot of people don't particularly care for the things. Not having to mess with keep an actual bottle secure just seems so much better.
I have the 3l Milspec version of the Camelbak, and I love it. I also carry at least two waterbottles as well. As I like to stay hydrated. Actually the Camelbak is the only thing (other than my jersey) that I want on my back when I'm out riding.
Digital_Cowboy is offline  
Old 03-23-12, 04:22 AM
  #11  
Street Pedaler
Senior Member
 
Street Pedaler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: NW Louisiana
Posts: 731

Bikes: 2011 Trek Madone 5.2 (RIP), 2013 Trek Domane 5.9

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
...or maybe you're blitzing rock gardens at race pace on a mountain bike. I've lost stuff from jersey pockets that way, let alone bottle cages.



Dunno about anyone else, but simply riding makes my back sweaty Given a choice between 120F water from a bottle in the summer sun, or 75F water from a Camelbak, there's some perks to the Camelbak approach...
+1 even though I don't have a Camelback. Yet. After last summer, I definitely have one on the "To get" list this year.
Street Pedaler is offline  
Old 03-23-12, 05:41 AM
  #12  
krobinson103
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Incheon, South Korea
Posts: 2,836

Bikes: Nothing amazing... cheap old 21 speed mtb

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I find those things to be uncomfortable in any sport. Used one in airsoft because of the sheer amount you sweat in summer dressed in cammo carrying about 15kg to extra stuff in a forest. I like to carry a bottle or 2 of water attached to the bike and have nothing but my cycling shorts and jersey in summer.
krobinson103 is offline  
Old 03-23-12, 06:59 AM
  #13  
rjc100
Senior Member
 
rjc100's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Jackson, MI
Posts: 155

Bikes: Lemond Croix DeFer

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
During rides above 90 degrees the Camelbak is the volume I need to stay hydrated. I also fill it half full with ice, and other than some sloshing sound, it stays colder than bottles.
rjc100 is offline  
Old 03-23-12, 07:22 AM
  #14  
Yo Spiff
Carpe Velo
 
Yo Spiff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 2,514

Bikes: 2000 Bianchi Veloce, '88 Trek 900, '88 Schwinn Prologue, '92 Schwinn Crosscut, '03 Diamondback Tandem, '94 Yokota Grizzly Peak

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I hope the OP didn't expect to get consistent answers!
Yo Spiff is offline  
Old 03-23-12, 08:29 AM
  #15  
Stealthammer
Still spinnin'.....
 
Stealthammer's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Whitestown, IN
Posts: 1,208

Bikes: Fisher Opie freeride/urban assault MTB, Redline Monocog 29er MTB, Serrota T-Max Commuter, Klein Rascal SS, Salsa Campion Road bike, Pake Rum Runner FG/SS Road bike, Cannondale Synapse Road bike, Santana Arriva Road Tandem, and others....

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have used them since they first appeared and I have two sizes that I still use for cycling, horseback riding, hiking, bouldering, whatever. I use them to carry my water, but also Powerbars, Gelpaks, my ID and cell phone, tools, a spare tube, whatever. I can also get a quick drink easily on a technical downhill or in tight wooded areas or when singletracking, where reaching for a frame mounted water bottle would be impossible without slowing down or stopping, and I would personally rather keep the weight off the bike for handling purposes alone. I get a kick out of seeing someone riding a $4000 sub-17lb bike with two large water bottles full of water and a seatbag full of tools.

Last edited by Stealthammer; 03-25-12 at 07:01 AM.
Stealthammer is offline  
Old 03-23-12, 08:53 AM
  #16  
himespau 
Senior Member
 
himespau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 11,124
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1628 Post(s)
Liked 91 Times in 71 Posts
I have a backpack with hydration bladder (3L) that I sometimes use for commuting. I go back and forth between that (easy of just hopping on and going, huge capacity) with a smaller bag in my folding basket and waterbottles (not on my back so less sweat until it gets super hot when it doesn't matter, fits in my locker unlike the rigid internally framed backpack, just like storing bottles in the fridge better than bladder, easier to clean). Right now bottles and small bag are winning, but that might change when summer comes.
himespau is offline  
Old 03-23-12, 09:47 AM
  #17  
tpelle
Senior Member
 
tpelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 1,068
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have a Camelback, and except for short rides I always use it - either filled with plain water for cooler days, or with ice cubes and water for hot days. One thing I recommend, however, is to replace the plain rubber hose with one they sell that is in an insulated sleeve. On hot days, that first sip of water out of the standard hose was warm, but with the insulated hose it is much cooler.
tpelle is offline  
Old 03-23-12, 12:05 PM
  #18  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 5,454

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1054 Post(s)
Liked 98 Times in 70 Posts
I don't think I've used my hydration pack for more than a year. Maybe two.

Ice cubes in insulated (Polar) water bottles work fine for me up to two hours, easier to clean, and cooler on my back. Longer than that, and I'll find a convenience store, buy something, and use their soda fountain to refill. (Rarely I get unlucky and have to buy actual water!)

I save the pack anyways for those occasions when I get to ride somewhere remote, where it's more than two hours between civilized outposts. Since I'm not into mountain biking, that doesn't happen often.
pdlamb is offline  
Old 03-23-12, 01:05 PM
  #19  
Dudelsack 
A might bewildered...
 
Dudelsack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Loovul
Posts: 6,529

Bikes: Bacchetta Giro ATT 26; Lemond Buenos Aires

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 80 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
The new Camelbak tubing, the Antidote, is pretty cool.

I didn't use them on my road bike, but on my bent a bladder fits in the insulated sleeve of my Brainbag. I use the filter and it's great. I'd get laughed at if I were a poseur, but on a bent I get laughed at anyway.

They'd be perfect on an upright if you could mount them on the frame somehow. They do tend to make your back feel icky.
__________________
We are on earth to help others; what on earth the others are here for I donít know.
Dudelsack is offline  
Old 03-23-12, 01:27 PM
  #20  
ShimmerFade
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Germany
Posts: 269
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have a Dakine 3L that is awesome. Perfect for MTB or any longer ride. I can carry an extra tube, mini pump, mini tool, extra layers in winter, cell phone, keys, and muesli bars with room to spare for more food on longer rides. I never even notice I have it on.
ShimmerFade is offline  
Old 03-23-12, 08:56 PM
  #21  
ottawa_adam
Senior Member
 
ottawa_adam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Ottawa Canada
Posts: 448

Bikes: kona dew hybrid, MEC shadowlands

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I use a bladder in a light trekking day pack for day rides, so long as my bike is not encumbered with panniers, etc.

In general, I drink a lot of water and stay well hydrated.

I don't find the extra weight on my back to be detrimental. Besides, for the early part of the ride, the water keeps my back cool.

I also don't require my water to remain cold all day; as long as I'm hydrated, I'm fine.

Using a small pack also allows me to carry incidentals securely, like keys, money, phone, etc.
ottawa_adam is offline  
Old 03-23-12, 09:54 PM
  #22  
DX-MAN
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,788
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Never popped for the actual Camelback, the $80+ was just too much to drop, when I could get something equivalent for less than half.

Using a Coleman (from Wally) right now, just as a backpack for the winter (about ready to pop the bladder back in); the ONLY thing wrong with them is the bite valve, but a $7 Camelback Big Bite Valve fixes that. 3rd year on the Coleman, 5th on the BBV.

My daughter uses the one I had before getting the Coleman (a Wally 'Outdoor' model, still in near-perfect shape from '04-05 time frame), and my nephew has the one before that one ('02 no-name), still VERY useable. The three of them TOGETHER cost about the same as a good CB.
DX-MAN is offline  
Old 03-23-12, 11:01 PM
  #23  
Yo Spiff
Carpe Velo
 
Yo Spiff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 2,514

Bikes: 2000 Bianchi Veloce, '88 Trek 900, '88 Schwinn Prologue, '92 Schwinn Crosscut, '03 Diamondback Tandem, '94 Yokota Grizzly Peak

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by DX-MAN View Post
Never popped for the actual Camelback, the $80+ was just too much to drop, when I could get something equivalent for less than half.
I only paid about $50 for my Lobo on a good clearance. It wasn't the current model but I don't care. I used my previous Lobo about 11 years and my daughter is using it now. Actually, I think the older one was better. Of course, I've seen other makes for as little as $25.
Yo Spiff is offline  
Old 03-23-12, 11:38 PM
  #24  
no1mad 
Thunder Whisperer
 
no1mad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: NE OK
Posts: 8,852

Bikes: '06 Kona Smoke

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 271 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Dudelsack View Post
The new Camelbak tubing, the Antidote, is pretty cool.

I didn't use them on my road bike, but on my bent a bladder fits in the insulated sleeve of my Brainbag. I use the filter and it's great. I'd get laughed at if I were a poseur, but on a bent I get laughed at anyway.

They'd be perfect on an upright if you could mount them on the frame somehow. They do tend to make your back feel icky.
Like this?
__________________
Community guidelines
no1mad is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 01:09 AM
  #25  
wphamilton
Senior Member
 
wphamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Alpharetta, GA
Posts: 14,798

Bikes: Nashbar Road

Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2665 Post(s)
Liked 119 Times in 82 Posts
I may reconsider this summer if it's 100+ and I'm riding for three hours or more but right now I think I'd hate it. I suppose if you're careless about hydration, as I am, a camelbak is rather low on your list of priorities.
wphamilton is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.