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I need a bike!!

Old 04-29-12, 04:19 PM
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MyNEWbike
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I need a bike!!

Ok, so, I am SICK OF IT!---Gas prices are ridiculous (and Rising), Insurance, Repairs, TRAFFIC (annoying ass-crazy-dangerous-drivers), Cops pulling you over at 2 a.m for failing tailights!! All Of 'IT'!

So Im done. I mean, I live in BOULDER, Colorado for cryin' out loud....what BETTER city to be a bike commuter. Right?

Problem is....I know Jack about bikes. Not to say I haven't done my fair share of Road/ & MT Biking....just usually on borrowed bikes...and sitting back, enjoying the view while my biking buddies wax ecstatic about which new "Badass gears" they got, or Carbon this, Shifters that....... And besides, bikes have just come so damn far since I was a bit younger...all these new terms, and parts, and technology...it's a bit Intimidating.

I don't really even know where to begin!

So, I come to you! Please pardon my 'nOObness' and have pity on me??
Basically I am just looking for advice on 2 main topics: Which "style" of bike to get.....and what "brand" of bike to get. I'm sure all of you have varying opions, but that is Exactly what I need right now. I am NOT incompetent...I will DEFINITELy being doing my research...I just need a place to start.

Here's what I am lookin for:
PRICE RANGE--$800-$1800 (I know it's a wide range...just wanting a 'wide range' of options)
USES--Lots of commuting (paved roads/ paths)---BUT, I also want a bike that is 'Badass' enough to handle some moderate off-road trails. I live near the mountains after all---possibly be able to haul a small amount of gear (groceries, sport climbing gear, maybe a BABY?? :-)
ME: Male; 6'3"; 195lbs.

Also, what about those mountain bikes with "locking shocks"??--are they any good for roads?
Or, what the hell is a CycloCross?? Someone suggested it. Would this work for me?

Anyway, thanks everyone.
Cheers,
steve

Last edited by MyNEWbike; 04-29-12 at 05:05 PM.
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Old 04-29-12, 04:37 PM
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This looks cool
https://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...name=Multi+Use
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Old 04-29-12, 04:46 PM
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Just go sightsee in bike shops for a while.. Id steer clear of the Posh ones ,
so you don't feel too embarrassed asking simple questions.

Step 1 find your favorite bike shop to do business with ,
the brands are all pretty good in proper bike shops.

Lots of bikes with wider tire capacity are offered for commuting .. 700c 32 wide
is the new 27 by 1.25" descendant.
disc brakes will be good in the winter , add a pair of studded tires
when the snow ploughs don't get down to bare pavement

Real Cross is fun to watch, they are a winter twisty path loop around the Park,
course designers force everybody off their bike at least once a lap
with a barrier to jump over , then get back on the bike.

The real Pros in that sport, can do that without even slowing down.

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Old 04-29-12, 05:53 PM
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I'd check out the Specialized Tricross. It has disc brakes, a rugged frame, is fun to ride, handles pretty good, has eyelets for attaching a rack and fenders. One feature that this bike has that most others dont is that the cables are internally routed. MSRP is $1900 but most of the lbs in my area offer it for 2-3 hundred less.
https://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...name=Multi+Use
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Old 04-29-12, 06:18 PM
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that does look pretty sweet.


fietsbob


Just go sightsee in bike shops for a while.. Id steer clear of the Posh ones ,
so you don't feel too embarrassed asking simple questions.
Yea for sure! After spending some time combing forum pages, i am seeing my question repeated frequently. I guess it's no suprise that everyone wants a Good, Strong, Longlasting bike built specific to their ever intricate needs.
But. . . who really has all that precious time to burn reading forum pages anyway!? -- Guess I'll just walk my ass to one of the many hundred bike shops in Boulder and see who I meet :-)

thankyouthankyou everyone!
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Old 04-30-12, 06:29 AM
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Well get a pair of bolt cutters and and try a few that look good before purchasing ( just kidding) There is/was a rental place on Pearl st .
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Old 04-30-12, 06:52 AM
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Get a Salsa Vaya.
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Old 04-30-12, 07:16 AM
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that Specialized commuter is sweet. I wonder how much it weighs?
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Old 04-30-12, 08:37 AM
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Originally Posted by MyNEWbike View Post
that does look pretty sweet.
It does.

Originally Posted by MyNEWbike View Post
Guess I'll just walk my ass to one of the many hundred bike shops in Boulder and see who I meet :-)
Srsly? Hundreds? I bet there are at least a dozen. Local bike shops are a good place to start.
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Old 04-30-12, 09:13 AM
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I'd have to go with either a Surly Ogre or a Salsa Vaya.
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Old 04-30-12, 09:53 AM
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Cannondale bad boys are a good option, robust but still quick enough to not lose interest.
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Old 04-30-12, 09:57 AM
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For babies and light hauling, get yourself a trailer.
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Originally Posted by Bjforrestal View Post
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Old 04-30-12, 11:12 AM
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Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post

Srsly? Hundreds? I bet there are at least a dozen. Local bike shops are a good place to start.
I was being a little sarcastic.





Also, there is obviously a lot of talk about weight. . . . what should I look for in terms of range? What's an extremely "light" bike...what's a "heavy" one? Then I'll have a better idea as of what I should be expecting.
Thanks!!
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Old 04-30-12, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Artkansas View Post
For babies and light hauling, get yourself a trailer.
YEAH...Totally agreed! Seems like the most practical option. I was thinking about building my OWN. I am a welder and could probably build myself something like This:
https://surlybikes.com/bikes/bill_trailer

Only problem is that hitch looks pretty complicated....not sure how well I could do that. But damn..that thing is just soooooo expensive.
Also, I'd need someting else for baby...
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Old 04-30-12, 02:58 PM
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Cycle cross is a style of frame built for the sport, makes for a super versatile bike.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclo-cross

you end up with a bike that's racy, but also stable. Lots of clearance for any type of tire you need to put on it, room for fenders. I love my cx commuter, it's not as zippy as my road bike but it carries weight better and can take on light trails fairly well. I wouldn't do serious mountain biking with it though.

There isn't really a bike that will do everything well, you can equip a bike to do off road well, but it will suck at road. Or you can equip it to do road well, but it will suck at down hill & obstacles. A cx frame built to be a commuter can do a little of both, but I'm not going to be joining pace lines or ripping down a mountain on that bike. And you don't want shocks unless you really are ripping down a mountain, they'll slow you down if you're using them on the road.

I think you should ask your bike buddies to take you window shopping.
As far as weight goes, I don't worry about it. It's good to know if you want to get a steel or aluminum frame before you buy, they both have their advantages and disadvantages too.
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Old 04-30-12, 03:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Antaresia View Post
Cycle cross is a style of frame built for the sport, makes for a super versatile bike.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclo-cross

you end up with a bike that's racy, but also stable. Lots of clearance for any type of tire you need to put on it, room for fenders. I love my cx commuter, it's not as zippy as my road bike but it carries weight better and can take on light trails fairly well. I wouldn't do serious mountain biking with it though.

There isn't really a bike that will do everything well, you can equip a bike to do off road well, but it will suck at road. Or you can equip it to do road well, but it will suck at down hill & obstacles. A cx frame built to be a commuter can do a little of both, but I'm not going to be joining pace lines or ripping down a mountain on that bike. And you don't want shocks unless you really are ripping down a mountain, they'll slow you down if you're using them on the road.

I think you should ask your bike buddies to take you window shopping.
As far as weight goes, I don't worry about it. It's good to know if you want to get a steel or aluminum frame before you buy, they both have their advantages and disadvantages too.
+1 ^ This is excellent information!

You might also check out the Surly Cross Check!
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Old 04-30-12, 03:25 PM
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And Trek's Dual Sport bikes .. a commuter - fire road riding, utility kid trailer towing .
pretty versatile . wheels like Cross bikes.. 700c 35ish.. and room for mudguards.
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Old 05-01-12, 09:35 AM
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Antaresia


Cycle cross is a style of frame built for the sport, makes for a super versatile bike.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclo-cross

you end up with a bike that's racy, but also stable. Lots of clearance for any type of tire you need to put on it, room for fenders. I love my cx commuter, it's not as zippy as my road bike but it carries weight better and can take on light trails fairly well. I wouldn't do serious mountain biking with it though.

There isn't really a bike that will do everything well, you can equip a bike to do off road well, but it will suck at road. Or you can equip it to do road well, but it will suck at down hill & obstacles. A cx frame built to be a commuter can do a little of both, but I'm not going to be joining pace lines or ripping down a mountain on that bike. And you don't want shocks unless you really are ripping down a mountain, they'll slow you down if you're using them on the road.

I think you should ask your bike buddies to take you window shopping.
As far as weight goes, I don't worry about it. It's good to know if you want to get a steel or aluminum frame before you buy, they both have their advantages and disadvantages too.
Originally Posted by SlimRider View Post
+1 ^ This is excellent information!

You might also check out the Surly Cross Check!
YES it is! --thanks Antaresia.
One question though;
And you don't want shocks unless you really are ripping down a mountain, they'll slow you down if you're using them on the road.
What about those 'lockouts'....do thoes things Really work? - I mean do the Really stabibilze that much on the road?
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Old 05-01-12, 10:06 AM
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Yes, the lockouts really do work! However, if you're not doing much mountain biking, then they're most probably NOT going to be that useful to you. Suspension forks are used primarily for shock absorption and stability on rough terrain surfaces. Therefore, if you anticipate a bunch of roots, rocks, crevices, or potholes, a front suspension just might be necessary. OTOH, if you don't expect to encounter these obstacles to any significant degree, then a suspension fork just might be overkill.

Rigid forks are most useful on smooth to moderately irregular roads. An occasional root, rock, or crevice, is really no big deal. Rigid forks lend the greatest amount of assistance in applying the maximum amount of power to wheels.

If 80% of your cycling is for the purpose of commuting and the remainder of your cycling consist of hard packed mountainous dirt trails, then you don't need a suspension fork. Of course, if those mountainous dirt trails are cluttered with a bunch of roots, rocks, and uneven terrain, then suspension forks just might be required.


However personally, I'd only ride rigid forks unless the terrain was absolutely unbearable, otherwise....That said, lockouts are a viable option and they do work!

The main thing you want on variable terrain are wider tires. That's what really separates a MTB from any other type of bike. Tire width generally increases as you go from road to hybrid, hybrid to cyclocross, and cyclocross to MTB (mountain bike).

* Also, unlike MTN bikes, cyclocross bikes usually have drop handlebars, too.

Last edited by SlimRider; 05-01-12 at 10:16 AM.
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