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Upgrading Hubs, Need Advice. *ROAD*

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Upgrading Hubs, Need Advice. *ROAD*

Old 05-29-12, 08:36 PM
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deCycles
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Upgrading Hubs, Need Advice. *ROAD*

Hey everyone,

I am planning on upgrading the hubs on my Cannondale CAAD 9/6 road bike. One of my friends messed the rear one up trying to repack it so now there is a lot of resistance that I don't need to deal with. I am going on another cycling trip this summer from San Francisco to Bloomington, Indiana (my hometown), so new hubs would be nice. Does it matter which hubs I buy? My current ones are stock Shimano WH-R500 or something like that. There are Shimano 105's that I could buy but I don't know if I am going to mess anything up. I understand there are different amounts of holes, the 105's are 32 holes. The rear is also not radial lace compatible but the front 105 is. What does this mean? Is this upgrade possible? Anything advice would be useful!

-deCycles
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Old 05-29-12, 08:56 PM
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Before you replace the hubs, you might just want to remedy the problem with your current hubs. You friend probably used too much grease, grease that was too heavy -- perhaps automotive grease, or over tightened the cones. You will save a lot simply by taking the wheels to a bike shop and have them repack the bearings and adjust the cones -- probably less then $50. compared to $200+ for new hubs.
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Old 05-29-12, 09:14 PM
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Originally Posted by bikepro View Post
Before you replace the hubs, you might just want to remedy the problem with your current hubs. You friend probably used too much grease, grease that was too heavy -- perhaps automotive grease, or over tightened the cones. You will save a lot simply by taking the wheels to a bike shop and have them repack the bearings and adjust the cones -- probably less then $50. compared to $200+ for new hubs.
The hubs have about 9k miles on them, do they still have life left in them?
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Old 05-29-12, 10:05 PM
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bump
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Old 05-29-12, 10:47 PM
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Another thing to consider, besides the number of holes, is the flange diameter, and the distance between the flanges and the lock nuts. These measurements, along with the rim's spoke nipple seat diameter will determine the spoke length.

http://www.prowheelbuilder.com/spoke/index.php

For instance, if you buy a hub with a smaller flange diameter, your current spokes may not be long enough...so you may have to consider the cost of new spokes, also - anywhere from $0.50 to over $3.00 each.
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Old 05-29-12, 10:51 PM
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Originally Posted by deCycles View Post
Hey everyone,

I am planning on upgrading the hubs on my Cannondale CAAD 9/6 road bike. One of my friends messed the rear one up trying to repack it so now there is a lot of resistance that I don't need to deal with. I am going on another cycling trip this summer from San Francisco to Bloomington, Indiana (my hometown), so new hubs would be nice. Does it matter which hubs I buy? My current ones are stock Shimano WH-R500 or something like that. There are Shimano 105's that I could buy but I don't know if I am going to mess anything up. I understand there are different amounts of holes, the 105's are 32 holes. The rear is also not radial lace compatible but the front 105 is. What does this mean? Is this upgrade possible? Anything advice would be useful!

-deCycles
The old hubs and wheels may be serviceable. Have a bike shop check them out. If the old wheels are damaged, then consider new wheels. The rims have seen a lot of use and I wouldn't rebuild them. In buying new wheels, get some advice as to what sort of wheels you need for the type of riding that you do.
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Old 05-29-12, 11:00 PM
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Originally Posted by deCycles View Post
The hubs have about 9k miles on them, do they still have life left in them?
Yes. As long as they weren't damaged when your friend "serviced" them, then they could have another 40,000 miles in them. Shimano 105-level hubs are close to my favorites- good materials and seals, not exotic bling.

If one is damaged, replacing it with another Shimano 105 will get you across the country, several times.
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Old 05-29-12, 11:14 PM
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1st, clean, inspect, replace bearing balls.
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Old 05-30-12, 08:06 AM
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"replacing" hubs is not a simple thing. It means taking the wheel apart, then rebuilding the wheel, possibly with new spokes.
Unless there's something very special about your rim, it probably makes more sense to buy a complete wheel to replace the old one.

However, as already mentioned, your existing hub probably just needs a little 5 minute adjustment from an experienced mechanic.
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Old 05-30-12, 02:36 PM
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You say cycling trip so is this touring with Panniers and weight on the bike? If it is then I would go with 36 spokes on a 105 or Ultegra hub.

Radial lacing is where the spokes go direct from the hub to the rim without crossing any other spokes. This can make for very stiff wheel and in some circumstances I would almost say "A Jarring Ride" Lacing where the spokes cross 2 or 3 other spokes will give a "Softer" ride and if the build quality is good- then no strength is lost and in fact can make for a wheel that does not break spokes too often.

If the hub is Kaput- Then instead of lacing in a new hub- look at a new wheel. Preferably a Handbuilt wheel from one of the noted builders. There are plenty around and some of the other members can give a link to a local builder to you or a noted builder online. Your current rim may not be a quality unit and the standard for handbuilts is a Mavic "OpenPro" rim onto Ultegra or 105 hubs with 32 or 36 double butted spokes laced with a X3 pattern. Mine are Mavic CXP33 Rims on 105 hubs with 36 DB spokes with a X2 lacing pattern. More aero rim that is more expensive but they work well- give a comfortable ride and are strong.
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Old 05-30-12, 05:30 PM
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decyclesindiana.org for more information.

Basically all our gear is transported in Penske trucks. We average about 90-100 miles a day. A Shimano 105 rear hub is 75$ on nashbar.com

I can easily afford that so having mine serviced/ repaired is not really what I am getting at. I'd rather just replace the rear one and go fresh.

These are my current wheels http://bike.shimano.com/publish/cont...00.-type-.html

Is this hub compatible? http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...48_-1___202481
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Old 05-30-12, 07:31 PM
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Something like this ? http://www.ebay.com/itm/Handspun-Spo...item27c78f74b9

You can buy individual hub, spokes & rim if you want, but add in the labor and it will be quite a bit. If you want to reuse your rim, then the hub & rim spoke counts need to match. I build my own wheels, but that's usually to end up with something that's not available otherwise, or to replace a broken rim and reuse a good hub.
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Old 05-30-12, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by deCycles View Post
decyclesindiana.org for more information.

Basically all our gear is transported in Penske trucks. We average about 90-100 miles a day. A Shimano 105 rear hub is 75$ on nashbar.com

I can easily afford that so having mine serviced/ repaired is not really what I am getting at. I'd rather just replace the rear one and go fresh.

These are my current wheels http://bike.shimano.com/publish/cont...00.-type-.html

Is this hub compatible? http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...48_-1___202481
Yes, that hub is what will work on that wheel. However, rebuilding a wheel (which is what is required when you "replace the hub") can be fairly costly*. It's far more sensible to have a qualified shop look at the hub. If it needs replacing, they'll tell you, and provide options and cost estimates. If the hub truly is toast, replacing the whole wheel may be your cheapest option.

*I've been building my own wheels for 30 years. I have no idea what it costs nowadays to have a shop rebuild a wheel.
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Old 05-30-12, 08:17 PM
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I am fairly experienced when it comes to truing wheels and respoking them from my cycling trips. Thanks for all the information guys! This is a great place to get help with anything and I am sure I will be posting in the near future!
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Old 05-30-12, 11:02 PM
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Originally Posted by deCycles View Post
I am fairly experienced when it comes to truing wheels and respoking them from my cycling trips. Thanks for all the information guys! This is a great place to get help with anything and I am sure I will be posting in the near future!

If you're good at truing wheels, then you're 85% of the way to building good wheels. Warning: once you start building wheels it's hard to stop. It's genuinely addictive- I need to build a couple wheels every year or I get all twitchy. Plenty of pointers on building wheels on the Bike Mechanics forum
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