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Advice for Wheelset upgrade

Old 05-24-14, 03:33 PM
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jestupinan
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Advice for Wheelset upgrade

Hi all, I'm pretty new at cycling world and I've just changed from MTB to road cycling (kind of). So I just bought a 2013 specialized tricross Elite (see pic below) and I was wondering if I can upgrade its wheels to have a better looking and loose some pound (see the other pic I attach). I would like some new wheels below $1000....what do you think?









Thanks in advanced
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Old 05-24-14, 04:23 PM
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I don't understand the question. It looks to me like you simply need to find and buy a disc wheel set that you like better. I'm thinking that all it takes is money but, if you're looking to save a whole pound of weight, I doubt that's going to happen.
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Old 05-24-14, 04:25 PM
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What don't you like about the stock wheels?
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Old 05-24-14, 04:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
I don't understand the question. It looks to me like you simply need to find and buy a disc wheel set that you like better. I'm thinking that all it takes is money but, if you're looking to save a whole pound of weight, I doubt that's going to happen.
Hi, well I am not sure if any kind of Wheelset will work with disk brakes (most I see on the internet work with VBrake). Also my tires are 32mm and I don't know if that affects the Wheelset decision.

I've been reading a lot on the internet. There's a lot of information but I am not totally sure about which Wheelset should I choose.

Thanks
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Old 05-24-14, 04:38 PM
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A lot depends on how much you weigh, and what sort of riding you do. A wheel you might use for touring isn't the same as a wheel you would use for racing. And a wheel that might work for a 160 lb rider won't work well with a 250 lb rider.
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Old 05-24-14, 04:39 PM
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Maybe you can browse Niagaracycle. It's one of the largest sites I know of.
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Old 05-24-14, 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
A lot depends on how much you weigh, and what sort of riding you do. A wheel you might use for touring isn't the same as a wheel you would use for racing. And a wheel that might work for a 160 lb rider won't work well with a 250 lb rider.
thanks MRT2, I use my bike most of the time for fitness purpose on my city, which by the way has crappy roads (that's why I bought a cyclocross kind of bike). I weight 180 lb and also my city has LOTS of hills
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Old 05-24-14, 04:54 PM
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i can't help you with what you think would be an improvement, lookswise, but weight is more objective and i think you could save what i would consider a significant amount of weight on the wheels/tires just by switching tires/rims/spokes/tubes. those tires, at least, look kind of chunky to me from i what i can gather from the pic.

i would weigh them and then compare to what i could find on the web. some sites have a "build your wheel" type app...
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Old 05-24-14, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by hueyhoolihan View Post
i can't help you with what you think would be an improvement, lookswise, but weight is more objective and i think you could save what i would consider a significant amount of weight on the wheels/tires just by switching tires/rims/spokes/tubes. those tires, at least, look kind of chunky to me from i what i can gather from the pic.

i would weigh them and then compare to what i could find on the web. some sites have a "build your wheel" type app...
Those chunky tires are a good thing if the roads are crappy. If OP were a weight weenie, why did he go with a Tri Cross? My advice is to keep the stock wheels until they fail, which might not be for years.

beyond that, you might want to consult a wheel builder, rather than just seek the advise of internet strangers.

Last edited by MRT2; 05-24-14 at 05:09 PM.
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Old 05-24-14, 05:31 PM
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Originally Posted by jestupinan View Post
Hi, well I am not sure if any kind of Wheelset will work with disk brakes (most I see on the internet work with VBrake). Also my tires are 32mm and I don't know if that affects the Wheelset decision.
1. You need a disc wheelset for that bike. A V-Brake wheelset won't work because the hubs won't have a place to bolt the discs onto.
2. As long as you don't buy a wheelset with real wide or real narrow rims, you'll be fine. 32 mm is kind of an "in between" tire width andd will fit onto most any 700c rim.
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Old 05-24-14, 06:04 PM
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The stock wheels look fine to me, aesthetically speaking. I always remove stickers from new wheels.
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Old 05-24-14, 08:13 PM
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Originally Posted by JanMM View Post
The stock wheels look fine to me, aesthetically speaking. I always remove stickers from new wheels.
Me too, but then I've never had a really high end set of wheels that other riders might envy.
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Old 05-24-14, 09:19 PM
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2013 Specialized Tricross Elite Disc Compact Bicycle Type Cyclocross MSRP (new) $1550.00
2013 Specialized Tricross Elite Steel Disc Triple Bicycle Type Cyclocross MSRP (new) $1650.00
From Wikepedia
Cyclo-cross (sometimes cyclocross, CX, CCX, cyclo-X or 'cross) is a form of bicycle racing. Races typically take place in the autumn and winter (the international or "World Cup" season is October–February), and consist of many laps of a short (2.5–3.5 km or 1.5–2 mile) course featuring pavement, wooded trails, grass, steep hills and obstacles requiring the rider to quickly dismount, carry the bike while navigating the obstruction and remount. They have to be lightweight because competitors need to carry their bicycle to overcome barriers or slopes too steep to climb in the saddle. The sight of competitors struggling up a muddy slope with bicycles on their shoulders is the classic image of the sport, although unridable sections are generally a very small fraction of the race distance.

This might be yet another example of someone buying the wrong type bicycle and then trying to make it work. Did the bike shop really ask you what your primary purpose for this bike was or were they just trying to make a sale? It wasn't designed to be a road bike. It ought to be pretty light since it was intended to be carried by the rider for part of the course. You are considering spending up to 2/3 cost of the bike new for a replacement wheelset. Is that really wise?
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Old 05-25-14, 07:54 AM
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Originally Posted by VegasTriker View Post
2013 Specialized Tricross Elite Disc Compact Bicycle Type Cyclocross MSRP (new) $1550.00
2013 Specialized Tricross Elite Steel Disc Triple Bicycle Type Cyclocross MSRP (new) $1650.00
From Wikepedia
Cyclo-cross (sometimes cyclocross, CX, CCX, cyclo-X or 'cross) is a form of bicycle racing. Races typically take place in the autumn and winter (the international or "World Cup" season is October–February), and consist of many laps of a short (2.5–3.5 km or 1.5–2 mile) course featuring pavement, wooded trails, grass, steep hills and obstacles requiring the rider to quickly dismount, carry the bike while navigating the obstruction and remount. They have to be lightweight because competitors need to carry their bicycle to overcome barriers or slopes too steep to climb in the saddle. The sight of competitors struggling up a muddy slope with bicycles on their shoulders is the classic image of the sport, although unridable sections are generally a very small fraction of the race distance.

This might be yet another example of someone buying the wrong type bicycle and then trying to make it work. Did the bike shop really ask you what your primary purpose for this bike was or were they just trying to make a sale? It wasn't designed to be a road bike. It ought to be pretty light since it was intended to be carried by the rider for part of the course. You are considering spending up to 2/3 cost of the bike new for a replacement wheelset. Is that really wise?
just looked on the Specialized website. The Tricross is not a true cyclocross bike, but rather, a do anything bike, not unlike the Salsa Vaya, All City Space Horse, Giant Any Road, or Trek Cross Rip. I really like this category of bikes. IMO they are versatile enough for club rides, commuting, light touring, even packed dirt or crushed limestone trails. Specialized doesn't list the weight, but from the specs, I would estimate it is in the mid 20s. Not bad, but 5 to 8 lbs heavier than a true road bike.

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Old 05-25-14, 08:19 AM
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You can double what you spent to buy the bike pretty easily when you get t premium wheels

Glued on Sew-ups and Carbon rims? will weigh less

$1000 wheel set in your Planned desires?
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Old 05-25-14, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by VegasTriker View Post
This might be yet another example of someone buying the wrong type bicycle and then trying to make it work.
i disagree

if the op were asking about installing cruiser bars
or a suspension fork
or aero bars and an aerodynamic disk wheel
then yes

but it sounds more to me like someone is trying to increase the performance of a perfectly good bike
not realizing that the real limiting factors
are probably his legs and lungs

to the op
if you are concerned about the durability of the stock wheels
then you shouldnt be looking for lighter wheels
as lighter wheels are usually less strong wheels

if you are concerned about speed and efficiency
then a set of lighter tires with a nice supple casing
like panaracer paselas
might make riding on the road smoother and a bit more fun

but there is nothing you can buy for a good quality bike like yours
that will make a major difference in performance
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Old 05-26-14, 02:31 PM
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I used the information listed on Bikepedia, the bike industry website to classify the bike. They call it a Cyclocross. IMHO any time a bike builder tries to build a bike that crosses several categories you end up with a bike that really isn't best for any of the categories. Just too many compromises. It sounds more like "one size fits all". Not in my world.

There has been a great proliferation in terms used to classify bikes. Just a few decades ago there were only three or four bike types (ignoring the Schwinn and Huffy one and three speed bikes built mainly for kids). Most good bike shops carried only two types - a road or touring 10 speed bike or a racing bike but still only 10 speeds. You could special order a single-speed track bike but the stores I frequented did not have them on the floor. Then came the mountain bike and we were off to the races when it came to sub-categories for a bike. Now it is hard to keep track. Sometimes the names are less descriptive of the bike use and more an effort to hype the bike.
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Old 05-26-14, 02:43 PM
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I'm a fan of road tubeless. Bontrager sort of dominates that right now, but I hear Schwinn released a tubeless wheel set. Regardless, Bontrager Race Lites run about $700-800 plus $200ish for the tires? It's a thought, it really improved my ride quality
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Old 05-26-14, 02:56 PM
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I would agree with the suggestion to put a narrower, and more slick set of tires on it. If they fit, and I suspect they would, a set of 700 x28s that have less tread would feel faster, but still be enough for the occasional bump in the road.
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Old 05-26-14, 07:30 PM
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Originally Posted by VegasTriker View Post
I used the information listed on Bikepedia, the bike industry website to classify the bike. They call it a Cyclocross. IMHO any time a bike builder tries to build a bike that crosses several categories you end up with a bike that really isn't best for any of the categories. Just too many compromises. It sounds more like "one size fits all". Not in my world.

There has been a great proliferation in terms used to classify bikes. Just a few decades ago there were only three or four bike types (ignoring the Schwinn and Huffy one and three speed bikes built mainly for kids). Most good bike shops carried only two types - a road or touring 10 speed bike or a racing bike but still only 10 speeds. You could special order a single-speed track bike but the stores I frequented did not have them on the floor. Then came the mountain bike and we were off to the races when it came to sub-categories for a bike. Now it is hard to keep track. Sometimes the names are less descriptive of the bike use and more an effort to hype the bike.
while there are almost as many classifications of bikes
as there are bikes
most of the bikes in any category can be used effectively in adjacent categories

and the compromises made to create the tricross bikes
only very slightly limit their capabilities as cyclocross bikes
probably not enough that most people would ever notice
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Old 05-27-14, 01:56 AM
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Following @asque2000, I'd also suggest tubeless, which offer real performance advantages for rough, principally in terms of pinch flat elimination, self-healing to prevent puncture flats, and the ability to safely run lower pressure for increased comfort.

My suggested wheels would be American Classic Hurricane Disc at $849 direct from AmClassic. They're aero profile, tubeless specific and ready (taped, valves included), and weigh in at 1646gm. They're also a fairly wide rim, with an 18mm bead width, so they'll stretch a narrower tire to give feel of fatter rubber, but without the weight penalty.

American Classics hubs are among the best, and the whole build looks super sharp in black and grey to match your Tricross. The hubs are a smoky chrome, high flange design that look bonkers.

Factor in another $150 to slap on some IRC Roadlite or Hutchinson Fusion 3 tires and some Stan's sealant, and you'll be right at $1k with a sweet setup.

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Old 05-28-14, 04:30 AM
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Well thanks all for your replies and comments. Someone commented if this bike was the right choice for me since it seems more a Cyclocross bike than a road bike. Well, I went to San Francisco Roaring Mouse bike store which seems a very respectable bike store in the area. Because I came from MTB world and I have never ridden a road bike, I told them I wanted a kind of bike between a MTB and a road bike (more a transition bike) for a really bad roads in my city and with LOTs of hills. So that's why I bought this Tricross. So far they were right, after 2 weeks with the tricross, It feels just right, the ride position is not that bad compared with other road bikes I tested, and bad streets and holes don't bother me too much (of course, MTB on this was much more comfortable).

Returning to the wheelset topic: remember please I am kind a newbie to Bike world and I though changing wheelset was like changing my OEM truck wheels, something easy. I've been reading a lot on internet and it seems to be a lot of theories about wheelset upgrade, but I am still kind of confused. I agree to someone that said why spend $1000 on a $1500 bike...so I wonder, I need a $4000 bike so the upgrade makes more sense?

Anyways, I'll keep searching and try to make my mind on this subject.

Thanks to all again
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Old 05-28-14, 04:49 AM
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Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
Following @asque2000, I'd also suggest tubeless, which offer real performance advantages for rough, principally in terms of pinch flat elimination, self-healing to prevent puncture flats, and the ability to safely run lower pressure for increased comfort.

My suggested wheels would be American Classic Hurricane Disc at $849 direct from AmClassic. They're aero profile, tubeless specific and ready (taped, valves included), and weigh in at 1646gm. They're also a fairly wide rim, with an 18mm bead width, so they'll stretch a narrower tire to give feel of fatter rubber, but without the weight penalty.

American Classics hubs are among the best, and the whole build looks super sharp in black and grey to match your Tricross. The hubs are a smoky chrome, high flange design that look bonkers.

Factor in another $150 to slap on some IRC Roadlite or Hutchinson Fusion 3 tires and some Stan's sealant, and you'll be right at $1k with a sweet setup.

Those look very nice!!! Thanks I will take a look
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Old 05-28-14, 07:00 AM
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Originally Posted by jestupinan View Post
I agree to someone that said why spend $1000 on a $1500 bike...so I wonder, I need a $4000 bike so the upgrade makes more sense?
First of all, $1.5k is a very nice bike, one not critically deficient in anything, so upgrades to one are not put to waste. Your Tricross, in particular, is a very nice bike, and nicer wheels only make it nicer.

It is also not as though spending more on the top-line Tricross gets you anything notably better; the frame/fork and most components, incl. the wheels, are the same, just drivetrain upgrades.

Arguably, you *could* sell the Tricross and get something else for more money (certainly to get anything substantially nicer, and not just different, will cost you more than $850+Tricross sale price), and it's a pain in the ass. Of course you could have spent $2.5k on something else in the first place, but that ship has sailed.

I'd also argue that a nice set of wheels, especially tubeless, will do more to enhance the ride of the bike (and the looks!) than anything else you could upgrade on it.

So, if the bike is what you want, serves you well, fits you well, and you love it, I see no reason not to upgrade wheels and anything else.
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Old 05-28-14, 07:15 AM
  #25  
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The bike is fine. It would probably do better as a road bike with lighter wheels, and especially road bike tires.

How much off-road or very-rough-road riding do you do? If not much, you should probably get a good set of road tubes/tires and see how much that helps. Buy 'em online, too - MUCH cheaper. (Remember, this is a test to see what you like so you really want to minimize the cost) And yes, you doggone well better be able to change your tires and tubes yourself. A good set of road-specific tires can make a huge difference. A nice set of 700x25c Continental GP4000S tires from probikekit.com, perhaps...

If you like that, and still want to have a wheelset for more off-road type riding, then get yourself a lighter-weight set of disk-brake wheels for road use and put the heavier tires back on the original wheels. Get a set like this:

November Bicycles: Race smart. - FSW 23 Alloy Clinchers

Or this:

Black and Tan with Disc Brake Hubs - Boyd Cycling
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