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-   -   I need a beer cozy for my 3 liter water bladder. (https://www.bikeforums.net/general-cycling-discussion/954107-i-need-beer-cozy-my-3-liter-water-bladder.html)

WrightVanCleve 06-16-14 05:48 PM

I need a beer cozy for my 3 liter water bladder.
 
It is getting warm here and my water warmed up a bit earlier than I liked. My bag isn't insulated where the bladder sits, just a pouch for it, but I like the bag so I'm not getting rid of it. I can pack 2 of the 3 liter bladders in there anyway for really long rides if I figure I'm going to explore and get lost for a bit like I enjoy doing. When I do that, usually there is just farm roads and I often avoid areas that look settled.

I'm looking for a neoprene or insulating pouch for my water bladder.

I'll probably also get a Platypus 3 liter pouch to replace my aged Blackburns since they impart a taste to the water now. I don't like Camelbak pouches or bladders, really don't like the bladder opening at all and would rather have the open end like Blackburn or Platypus. The Camelbak pouch also looks like you need to put the bladder inside before you fill and I prefer to freeze the water in the bladder and I like to do a quick thaw and get the bladder unfrozen from the ice so I really don't want Camelbak. Blackburn isn't making bladders anymore, at least not finding anything new.

I did find a insulator for the Platypus pouches but it was at least $100 on Amazon, just a insulating pouch no backpack with it. I did find a generic pouch that I'd be interested in on E-Bay for around $15 but didn't see any info on it so I'm not likely to get that, I'd like to have a certain thickness to be sure I'm getting something that will work fairly well so I'm not likely to purchase that one and if it is so cheap I'm thinking that it is probably the thinner neoprene.

I had thought about making my own but the sheets of neoprene can get a bit pricey with the thicker stuff, at least for the 4mm thick sheets. This is still an option if I can't find what I'd like but I'd also like to not have to make something if I can just purchase what I want.

My internet search-fu isn't great so I don't think I'm finding all the options out there but could be that there are not very many options out there.

So, anyone know any good insulated pouches or bladders that open at the top that come with a removable insulating pouch.

fietsbob 06-16-14 07:22 PM

Neoprene Sheet with nylon on the outside? The stuff is sold by the yard ... Know anyone with a sewing machine?

I have a sheet if it under this keyboard.

Looigi 06-17-14 09:00 AM

IMO, neoprene is kinda heavy, and not the best insulator for its thickness and weight. What I would try is aluminized double walled bubble pack which can be assembled into a pocket to fit a bladder using tape to join the pieces. Home Depot, Lowes, TrueValue all have it. It may not be that durable but it's very cheap and easy to make another. Use two layers for more insulation if desired.

Tim_Iowa 06-17-14 02:13 PM

Neoprene the cheap: find a trashed wetsuit (scuba suit), and cut off a sleeve or pant leg. Just fold the ends inside, doubled over (like a sock)

Ask around/search CL and garage sale listings; you never know what folks have brought home from a vacation.

Otherwise, you could probably fashion something out of some cheap, lightweight insulating material (think the mylar car sun shades), as Looigi suggested. Silver A/C vent tape would complete the look...

InOmaha 06-18-14 09:19 AM

Maybe there is a cooler bag like you would use to bring home cold items from the grocery store in a similar size.

Looigi 06-18-14 09:35 AM

Yeah. I dive in CA and the Northeast using wetsuits and drysuits. I though about suggesting getting a leg or arm off a used wetsuit at dive shop but feel the aluminized bubble pack is a much better solution. Here's a huge roll at Amazon, but they have much smaller quantities at the local hardware store.

Reflectix BP24050 24-Inch-by-50-Foot Bubble Pack Insulation - Weatherproofing Window Insulation Kits - Amazon.com

Rootman 06-18-14 10:12 AM

Quite a few good ideas here, how about just plain old bubble pack? It's a real good insulator and can be held together with duct tape. How about slipping one of those freezers packs, the flexible kind filled with goo between it and the sleeve?

WrightVanCleve 06-18-14 01:41 PM

Going to try that aluminized bubble pack and glue it together.

I used a small towel, worked ok. Bubble pack should be good. If I have to make a new one too often, I'll go back to checking for something else.

cyccommute 06-18-14 04:10 PM


Originally Posted by WrightVanCleve (Post 16856594)
It is getting warm here and my water warmed up a bit earlier than I liked. My bag isn't insulated where the bladder sits, just a pouch for it, but I like the bag so I'm not getting rid of it. I can pack 2 of the 3 liter bladders in there anyway for really long rides if I figure I'm going to explore and get lost for a bit like I enjoy doing. When I do that, usually there is just farm roads and I often avoid areas that look settled.

I'm looking for a neoprene or insulating pouch for my water bladder.

I'll probably also get a Platypus 3 liter pouch to replace my aged Blackburns since they impart a taste to the water now. I don't like Camelbak pouches or bladders, really don't like the bladder opening at all and would rather have the open end like Blackburn or Platypus. The Camelbak pouch also looks like you need to put the bladder inside before you fill and I prefer to freeze the water in the bladder and I like to do a quick thaw and get the bladder unfrozen from the ice so I really don't want Camelbak. Blackburn isn't making bladders anymore, at least not finding anything new.

I did find a insulator for the Platypus pouches but it was at least $100 on Amazon, just a insulating pouch no backpack with it. I did find a generic pouch that I'd be interested in on E-Bay for around $15 but didn't see any info on it so I'm not likely to get that, I'd like to have a certain thickness to be sure I'm getting something that will work fairly well so I'm not likely to purchase that one and if it is so cheap I'm thinking that it is probably the thinner neoprene.

I had thought about making my own but the sheets of neoprene can get a bit pricey with the thicker stuff, at least for the 4mm thick sheets. This is still an option if I can't find what I'd like but I'd also like to not have to make something if I can just purchase what I want.

My internet search-fu isn't great so I don't think I'm finding all the options out there but could be that there are not very many options out there.

So, anyone know any good insulated pouches or bladders that open at the top that come with a removable insulating pouch.

I think you are somewhat confused about the Camelbak. The bladder doesn't need to be in the back pack to fill it on most of their packs. The Rogue and the Classic have bladders that remain in place but they aren't all that difficult to deal with and they are lower volume as well. For the others, you remove the bladder from a zipped pocket, fill and then slide back into the pocket. They are easy to use. Camelbak makes an Unbottle which is a 100 oz bladder in a neoprene sleeve without backpack straps. The bladder and sleeve are around $50 on Amazon.

I have owned a first generation Platypus and never found the top opening to be all that convenient. It's a nice idea but it leaked.


Originally Posted by Looigi (Post 16861407)
Yeah. I dive in CA and the Northeast using wetsuits and drysuits. I though about suggesting getting a leg or arm off a used wetsuit at dive shop but feel the aluminized bubble pack is a much better solution. Here's a huge roll at Amazon, but they have much smaller quantities at the local hardware store.

Reflectix BP24050 24-Inch-by-50-Foot Bubble Pack Insulation - Weatherproofing Window Insulation Kits - Amazon.com

There are a some problems with the Reflectix. First, it doesn't have the same insulation properties of neoprene...about half the r-value per inch. Second, you have to form a pouch out of the material. How do you propose to do that. It probably won't sew well as the stitches won't hold and glue wouldn't do much better. You could use tape but even that is going to perform poorly and probably worse when you get it wet. If you do manage to get a pouch made of the material, the bubbles aren't going to stand up to regular use all that well...think bubble wrap and the joy of popping it. Once you pop the bubbles, the insulation factor goes down steeply.

Neoprene is a more durable material that is easier to sew.

WrightVanCleve 06-18-14 05:03 PM


Originally Posted by cyccommute (Post 16862829)
I think you are somewhat confused about the Camelbak. The bladder doesn't need to be in the back pack to fill it on most of their packs. The Rogue and the Classic have bladders that remain in place but they aren't all that difficult to deal with and they are lower volume as well. For the others, you remove the bladder from a zipped pocket, fill and then slide back into the pocket. They are easy to use. Camelbak makes an Unbottle which is a 100 oz bladder in a neoprene sleeve without backpack straps. The bladder and sleeve are around $50 on Amazon.

I have owned a first generation Platypus and never found the top opening to be all that convenient. It's a nice idea but it leaked.





Neoprene is a more durable material that is easier to sew.

I have a Camelbak bladder, came with my commuter/long trips/when I need a big backpack, backpack. CamelBak | VANTAGE FT Large Capacity Backcountry Hydration Pack I'm very happy with this bag.

There is a neoprene insulator for Camelbak bladders. You have to put the bladder in that pouch first before filling. I don't care for that. That is what I was referring to having to insert into the pouch first before filling. I've never put the bladder into my backpack before filling.

I feel the opening more difficult to fill with ice cubes if I forget to fill and freeze overnight. Most often I'll fill and freeze but sometimes I forget. I gave it a try, I just don't like it.

I just don't like the opening. Much prefer top loading. That is one reason I hung on to my Blackburns so long. They also didn't have a taste back then, but that was years ago and I didn't feel the need to replace them. I've liked Blackburn products and they had good products so I didn't think they'd get out of other markets. But, Camelbak is a very recognizable name and people always ask what kind of Camelbak that bag is, I use a Deuter bag for when I'm just going for a ride.

My bladders have a very nice fold over three times, then flip over the velcro. Never had a problem with leaking and very easy to fill.

I wanted neoprene initially for the durability, going to give the aluminized bubble wrap a shot to see how long it does last. If I get a season out of it, I'll probably just keep making them. If nothing else, it will give me an idea for a pattern to use if I decide I need to use neoprene, work out the bugs for the design. Making cheap models is much better than making expensive models. I'm pretty sure I can get a pouch made out of it. I may just try plain bubble wrap, I need to get some anyway to pack my bike for my trip so I'll have plenty left. They don't come in small rolls.

Looigi 06-19-14 06:04 AM


Originally Posted by cyccommute (Post 16862829)
... There are a some problems with the Reflectix. First, it doesn't have the same insulation properties of neoprene...about half the r-value per inch. Second, you have to form a pouch out of the material. How do you propose to do that. It probably won't sew well as the stitches won't hold and glue wouldn't do much better. You could use tape but even that is going to perform poorly and probably worse when you get it wet. If you do manage to get a pouch made of the material, the bubbles aren't going to stand up to regular use all that well...think bubble wrap and the joy of popping it. Once you pop the bubbles, the insulation factor goes down steeply...

I've done it cutting with scissors and taping together with vinyl tape, but not for insulating my camelbak. It worked exceptionally well for keeping electronic and optical gear cool under the sun in the desert and stood up fine to getting wet from dew. (The high reflectivity was key in this application.) In a cycling application, insulation value per weight rather than per thickness is likely a better measure of performance. Agree it won't be as durable as neoprene, but that's a tradeoff to make with performance and ease of fabrication and readily available materials. For a camelbak, you might not even bother taping it into a pocket shape but rather just cut a piece to fold and line the portion portion of the pack where the bladder goes.

cyccommute 06-19-14 09:00 AM


Originally Posted by WrightVanCleve (Post 16862952)
I have a Camelbak bladder, came with my commuter/long trips/when I need a big backpack, backpack. CamelBak | VANTAGE FT Large Capacity Backcountry Hydration Pack I'm very happy with this bag.

Then why not just use that bag? You can put any bladder in it you want. You don't have to use a Camelbak bladder in a Camelbak bag.


Originally Posted by WrightVanCleve (Post 16862952)
There is a neoprene insulator for Camelbak bladders. You have to put the bladder in that pouch first before filling. I don't care for that. That is what I was referring to having to insert into the pouch first before filling. I've never put the bladder into my backpack before filling.

I'm not sure we are understanding each other. The Unbottle comes in it's own pouch and you are right that they are difficult to remove but you never have to remove it from the pouch to fill it. The opening is easily accessible from the front of the bag. If you wanted to use it in a regular Camelbak pack, you could just slide it into place like you would an uninsulated bladder.

A Camelbak bladder in a regular Camelbak backpack doesn't have to be in the pack to fill it. I fill mine outside the pack and then slip them into the insulated sleeve in the pack.


Originally Posted by WrightVanCleve (Post 16862952)
I feel the opening more difficult to fill with ice cubes if I forget to fill and freeze overnight. Most often I'll fill and freeze but sometimes I forget. I gave it a try, I just don't like it.

I'm not sure how big your ice cubes are but the opening on a modern Camelbak bladder is about 4" across. The old ones...circa 1995...had really narrow openings but that changed long ago.


Originally Posted by WrightVanCleve (Post 16862952)
I just don't like the opening. Much prefer top loading. That is one reason I hung on to my Blackburns so long. They also didn't have a taste back then, but that was years ago and I didn't feel the need to replace them. I've liked Blackburn products and they had good products so I didn't think they'd get out of other markets. But, Camelbak is a very recognizable name and people always ask what kind of Camelbak that bag is, I use a Deuter bag for when I'm just going for a ride.


My bladders have a very nice fold over three times, then flip over the velcro. Never had a problem with leaking and very easy to fill.

To each his own.

WrightVanCleve 06-19-14 11:16 AM


Originally Posted by cyccommute (Post 16864526)
Then why not just use that bag? You can put any bladder in it you want. You don't have to use a Camelbak bladder in a Camelbak bag.



I'm not sure we are understanding each other. The Unbottle comes in it's own pouch and you are right that they are difficult to remove but you never have to remove it from the pouch to fill it. The opening is easily accessible from the front of the bag. If you wanted to use it in a regular Camelbak pack, you could just slide it into place like you would an uninsulated bladder.

A Camelbak bladder in a regular Camelbak backpack doesn't have to be in the pack to fill it. I fill mine outside the pack and then slip them into the insulated sleeve in the pack.



I'm not sure how big your ice cubes are but the opening on a modern Camelbak bladder is about 4" across. The old ones...circa 1995...had really narrow openings but that changed long ago.



To each his own.

That big bag is just too big for my general riding. The Deuter I have is quite small compared to that huge bag. More comfortable for long rides. My commutes are only about 15 to 17 miles, but I need to pack my scrubs, towel, lunch, and a few other things that I don't normally take on a general ride. Just can't get up early enough to get a longer ride in and not going to ride very long after work because I'm usually exhausted.

The problem with having to take them out of the pouch is when I'm thawing the bag before I fill the rest of the way. When I freeze my bladder, before I put it into my backpack, I like to thaw the bladder so the ice isn't sticking to the bladder. I run the bag under a bit of water to thaw out the stuff in the tube also. Not long, just enough to make the ice come off the bag. then I fill the rest of the way with water. I don't want to do this process with the bag in the insulator.

My cubes are not really huge, standard size, but I did have to buy a bag of ice from the Kwik-E-Mart when I thawed my freezer. While I was able to ultimately get the ice in, it took a little bit of crushing it down a bit before plopping it in. The opening isn't flexible. Just a bit more hassle than I want to deal with.

Those old Camelbak openings, yea, I really was turned off by them big time which is why I looked for a better bag then. I've gotten used to top opening and would prefer to just stay with them.

hillyman 06-19-14 01:34 PM

Dang, I thought this was going to be about beer


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