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Target Bikes that cost $300 or More Quality?

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Target Bikes that cost $300 or More Quality?

Old 11-30-14, 09:19 PM
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ICEN
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Target Bikes that cost $300 or More Quality?

Okay don't kill me

I seen a few bikes at Target that caught my interest for a few reason which I will explain.
Before I say anything here is one of the two bikes that interested me, Schwinn Mens Ascension 29" Mountain Bike - Black : Target

I will just break down my overall question first, for the bikes at Target that cost $300 and more, shouldn't they be of some quality? Because what else would you be paying more money for it those bikes too are nothing but low quality. Now I do realize compared to expensive bikes they are low quality, I just mean as a working bike that does what it does and needs to do what it needs to do, when the price point is ait $300 or more should I expect at least some quality compared to those cheaper $150 bikes???

First I will explain what caught my attention of that bike

- It has disk brakes, I am not expert on bikes, but I always herd disk brakes are superior, I even though disk brakes are not seen until like the $400 range on most bikes, so is this a good deal, would these brakes be superior to regular brakes and would they be of at least working quality.

- The bike has 29 inch wheels, 21 Gears which is obviously common in 2014 compared to back then, and overall I thought the bike LOOKED like it was at lest decent quality just by looks alone. I know you can't go based on looks but I was eyeing it up.

Now if you want to know this is why it caught my eye.

I am 22 now, when I was a teenager I remember my mom bought me a bike for Christmas, I remember it was from Walmart and it was only $150 max. It has regular brakes, it has 21 gears, the wheels are only 24 inches and I think on Ebay the bike is now worth like $600 if you had it brand new. Now about 6 months ago I went into my shed and got that bike out to play with it. Surprisingly I rode it for months until up to this date where its going to be snowing. The bike is easily at least 6+ years old and was kind of ruffed up but not too much since it was in the shed.

Now mind you I did all of these things on that bike, I rode around town, I shifted through MOST gears fine although sometimes it would skip like ONE gear, one day I tuned it myself it worked in all gears fine but then went back to skipping at least ONE gear. Overall I am saying it went in the general gear you were trying to get too, the front gears all 3 always worked fine. The brakes always worked fine. The main problem with that bike was just the one skipping of a gear or two.

Now I have went up very big and steep hils with that bike on low gears and have made it to the top with decent effort, on regular hills that are not super steep its very easy to get up even on that cheapo bike (Unless the quality was magically better back then then currently).

I rode it around town and on trails, but the bike was probably a bit too small for my age now since I got that bike back when I was a teen and didn't know about tuning bikes up and making sure everything works. Overall the bike worked and did was a bike should do, I do not consider it a great bike but just a bike that you ride almost anywhere with the only probably of the gear problem missing one or two gears in the back.

This is the reason the more expensive $300+ bikes at Target caught my attention

Because in my mind I am thinking, well if that bummy $150 bike could do that then surely these more expensive $300+ bikes should be a bit better and I should not expect lower results? I mean why else is the price higher if the bikes are still just as bad or as cheap.

I want to know what can I expect out of a bike like this that cost $300 or more.

Assuming that everything was put together correctly or assuming I took it to a LBS and they said everything is set up how it should be, would thinks bike go up hills fine, would it brake fine, would the disk brakes be fine, would the shifting be fine, would the bike overall be a bike and be of at least better quality then my older bike that was $150 cheaper???

I am getting many things for Christmas, I can't get something very big, I was thinking for the hell of it I could maybe pick up a new bike for when its not snowing or cold out. I figured that since it was $300 I could at least trust this bike to do well and I was thinking $300 at least isn't dirt cheap, I understand its no where near a high level bike, But I was hoping it could be semi-decent.
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Old 11-30-14, 09:39 PM
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I'd expect that bike to work fine as long as 1) you (or someone) carefully assembles it and at least checks that bearings are greased and properly set and that the gears are also correctly adjusted and 2) that it properly fits the rider (note that only one size is offered - and unlike a LBS there's probably no option to exchange stems, seatposts, etc. if necessary).

One problem with many big box store bikes is that they try to emulate more expensive bikes with full-suspension and fancy looking frames but do so only in appearance rather than function. But this one looks like a nice basic mountain bike that isn't set up to pretend to be something else. [But I am impressed by the stated maximum rider weight - not very many bikes can safely carry a load of over a ton.]
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Old 11-30-14, 10:00 PM
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Originally Posted by prathmann View Post
I'd expect that bike to work fine as long as 1) you (or someone) carefully assembles it and at least checks that bearings are greased and properly set and that the gears are also correctly adjusted and 2) that it properly fits the rider (note that only one size is offered - and unlike a LBS there's probably no option to exchange stems, seatposts, etc. if necessary).

One problem with many big box store bikes is that they try to emulate more expensive bikes with full-suspension and fancy looking frames but do so only in appearance rather than function. But this one looks like a nice basic mountain bike that isn't set up to pretend to be something else. [But I am impressed by the stated maximum rider weight - not very many bikes can safely carry a load of over a ton.]
Well Target did have a few bikes with full suspension and I herd to stay away from that if the bike is a cheaper bike which is why I didn't plan on getting any of those.

WTF : I did not notice that said 2,000+ pound of held weight... I didn't even know bikes can hold that much weight, how the hell would you even get 2,000 pounds on a bike anways 0_0

By any chance, do you or anyone know what is up with these disk brakes. Is this an advantage to have disk brakes because I thought it was sort of uncommon to have disk brakes unless you have a more expensive bike, from what I seen I never seen a bike in a store like Target with disk brakes, its the first bike I seen in a store with those type of brakes.

Basically I had three rules I was going to follow.

#1 I was not going to buy any bike that has a price point of like $150, $200, $250. I think $300 was a decently price point, and the reason I choose to at least give those bikes a shot if they reach that price point was because in my mind I am thinking, well it is after all $300 and its at least not as cheap as $150 or $200 so that money has to go somewhere, although I know a $300 could have a flaw I am just saying at that price point I would expect less flaws than a $150 bike. So that was my first rule when looking at those bikes it not buy anything under $300 for the simple fact of trying to eliminate flaws by price.

#2 The bike should not have full suspension unless its a more expensive bike to where I could see maybe the money was put towards that. On a $300 bike I would be more confident knowing more of that money was used to build the bike rather than make a ****ty version of suspension. I am basically staying away from full suspension because I assumed that ment more money was put towards suspension and since a $300 bike is not the most expensive I would want all the money going towards the bike rather than the suspension which I don't 100% need.

#3 The bike at least has to be of a decent brand. I don't want to try a new brand that was never herd of, or a brand with only one review, I was looking for some type of brand that has at least been around.

So overall, compared to the other bikes that one bike caught my attention because it had a wheel size of 29, the biked didn't look badly built based on looks alone not riding it. Looks can be deceiving a I know. 21 gears which is common. Disk Brakes which kind of amazed me because I can't recall seeing any bikes in a store with disk brakes. Price point was decent at $300 so I figured it might be alright, it didn't have the under the suspension so I figured no money was wasted on BS suspension that isn't even that great.
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Old 11-30-14, 10:22 PM
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I'd skip Target bikes. Not that they aren't any good, but there are better deals out there. Now is the time to pick up on winter sales and old stock from bike shops. A basic entry bike from a reputable bike shop will be worth it just knowing that it was properly built.
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Old 11-30-14, 10:50 PM
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Originally Posted by prathmann View Post
I'd expect that bike to work fine as long as 1) you (or someone) carefully assembles it and at least checks that bearings are greased and properly set and that the gears are also correctly adjusted and 2) that it properly fits the rider (note that only one size is offered - and unlike a LBS there's probably no option to exchange stems, seatposts, etc. if necessary).

One problem with many big box store bikes is that they try to emulate more expensive bikes with full-suspension and fancy looking frames but do so only in appearance rather than function. But this one looks like a nice basic mountain bike that isn't set up to pretend to be something else. [But I am impressed by the stated maximum rider weight - not very many bikes can safely carry a load of over a ton.]
+1 on the assembly.

Many decades ago, I got a part-time job assembling bikes for a department store. Their hiring requirement was I had a pulse. I was paid by the bike, and to pass inspection it had to look like a bike to an untrained eye. I doubt things have improved.
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Old 11-30-14, 10:53 PM
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Originally Posted by ICEN View Post

By any chance, do you or anyone know what is up with these disk brakes. Is this an advantage to have disk brakes because I thought it was sort of uncommon to have disk brakes unless you have a more expensive bike, from what I seen I never seen a bike in a store like Target with disk brakes, its the first bike I seen in a store with those type of brakes.
Advantages are largely based on the terrain and the type of riding. Rim brakes become less reliable when the braking surface is compromised - think rain, snow, mud, etc. All these things stick to the surface of your wheel and impede the stopping power of rim brakes. Disc brakes circumvent this problem by providing an alternate braking surface, namely the rotor. They're popular on off-road bike as you are more likely to have debris stuck to your rim surface, although they are slowly becoming popular on higher end road bikes due to carbon wheels atrocious wet weather braking performance.

Basically I had three rules I was going to follow.

#1 I was not going to buy any bike that has a price point of like $150, $200, $250. I think $300 was a decently price point, and the reason I choose to at least give those bikes a shot if they reach that price point was because in my mind I am thinking, well it is after all $300 and its at least not as cheap as $150 or $200 so that money has to go somewhere, although I know a $300 could have a flaw I am just saying at that price point I would expect less flaws than a $150 bike. So that was my first rule when looking at those bikes it not buy anything under $300 for the simple fact of trying to eliminate flaws by price.
$400 on bikesdirect.com can bag you a much much better bike.

#2 The bike should not have full suspension unless its a more expensive bike to where I could see maybe the money was put towards that. On a $300 bike I would be more confident knowing more of that money was used to build the bike rather than make a ****ty version of suspension. I am basically staying away from full suspension because I assumed that ment more money was put towards suspension and since a $300 bike is not the most expensive I would want all the money going towards the bike rather than the suspension which I don't 100% need.
See above

#3 The bike at least has to be of a decent brand. I don't want to try a new brand that was never herd of, or a brand with only one review, I was looking for some type of brand that has at least been around.
The Schwinn that Target sells isn't the same Schwinn that you know and love. Then again, the same can be said for Bikes Direct lol. But

So overall, compared to the other bikes that one bike caught my attention because it had a wheel size of 29, the biked didn't look badly built based on looks alone not riding it. Looks can be deceiving a I know. 21 gears which is common. Disk Brakes which kind of amazed me because I can't recall seeing any bikes in a store with disk brakes. Price point was decent at $300 so I figured it might be alright, it didn't have the under the suspension so I figured no money was wasted on BS suspension that isn't even that great.
Not all disc brakes are created equal and they can be a serious pain in the ass if they are of low quality and/or not configured correctly.

Be warned that buying a boxed bike is more complicated than just simply putting the parts together. It'll ship 80% assembled but if you want the bike to last more than a few months it's in your best interest to disassemble it completely and lubricate/grease all moving parts. Of course a poorly assembled box bike can last years if it is rarely used -- by rarely I mean it averages less than 30 miles a week -- which explains the longevity of kids/teen bikes from Walmart, target, etc.
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Old 12-01-14, 09:06 AM
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It's the same guy that gets paid $10.00 to assemble that bike as the $50.00 bikes. There will be no local support if something goes wrong with it under warranty. The LBS may or may not be able to work on it in the future if the components are not standard. The bike itself is more likely to have better parts but the overall quality is probably no different.
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Old 12-01-14, 09:22 AM
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NOTE: there is no Bicycle service department a Target wally world and etc. your big box store..

Often nobody even has a clue how to put the fork around properly, taking the thing out of the Box.

all decisions at Corporate HQ are based on Low cost and QC is an early victim of cost cutting.

you get what you pay for ..
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Old 12-01-14, 10:04 AM
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Much good info in this thread

Especially relating to the original build, i.e., check all bearings for lube and proper adjustment. I've seen target and wally world bikes with forks on backwards, brakes hitting tires when applied, and someone posted a photo a while back that showed a bike on the floor (ready to ride) with both cranks in the same position on either side.

I think if you're capable of tearing down a bike, relubing(or lubing) and building it back up properly, and you stick to mups you could end up with a bike you could ride on a semi regular basis that would satisfy your needs. Regular commuting or off road jaunts might be another thing. Of course others may cite instances where their target bike was entirely satisfactory. And buying a bike at an lbs does not automatically guarantee satisfaction, but you can at least probably feel comfortable that it has been assembled properly and is safe to ride as is when you take it off the floor with the added benefit of service availability. And if you are at $300, your not very far from an LBS ride.

If you don't have the funds available for the higher priced lbs bike at the moment, I think that you are much better to ask about some type of layaway plan, wait until you have saved enough, or find a friend who can help you with evaluation and mechanics and look at CL.

No one has ever said to me, "I wish I had purchased a target bike, the one I did buy is too good!"

Last edited by okane; 12-01-14 at 10:09 AM.
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Old 12-01-14, 10:53 AM
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In my area there are a few local bike shops that sell trade-ins and reconditioned bikes. You could buy a better bike for less and get the experience, knowledge and support of bike experts. New is not always better. More expensive is not always better. Appearances can deceive and...OMG, I've become an old fart! But seriously, consider a pre-owned bike from an LBS where they can answer your questions. Now "get off my lawn" (humor).
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Old 12-01-14, 10:55 AM
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My experience with discount store bikes is that the components are the weakest items. The bare frames are fine but the suspension systems, brakes, shifters and wheels are of significantly lower quality than what you'd get at a bike store. The only bike I'd buy at a discount store is a single speed beach cruiser.
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Old 12-01-14, 11:45 AM
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I counted five mtn bikes at performance bikes for 300 bucks and for thirty bucks more here's a nice 29er with disc breaks. Be sure to join thier club to save more up front. If you're gonna spend that much on a bike it might as well be a nice one.
No need to thank me.
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Old 12-01-14, 04:57 PM
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This bike has all the attributes that attract buyers who don't know a decent bike from a bicycle shaped object.

Suspension - If you are going to ride this bike around town and never go on a rough mountain bike trail, suspension only adds to the weight of this pretty obese (38 pound) bike. If $300 is what you have to spend, go for a bike that has NO suspension. That way the builder can put the money spent on worthless suspension into other components that really count like the front and rear derailleurs. Target just specifies Shimano FD and RD. You can bet it is one of the last three on the list below which is from high-end to entry-level.
Shimano XTR/Shimano XT/Shimano SLX/Shimano Zee/Shimano Deore/Shimano Alivio/Shimano Acera/Shimano Altus/Shimano Tourney It is hard to read the writing on the RD.

29 inch wheels - the latest thing but they really don't do anything better than older 26" and 700c wheels other than raise the gear range slightly.

21 speeds - that's nothing to brag about. Most MTBs with a triple chainring have 24 to 27 for a better choice of getting a comfortable cadence (rate at which you spin the cranks). It is even getting harder to find high quality components for 24 speed bikes since few are being made these days.

One size 18" fits all? According to the Target website this bike comes in only the 18" frame. It might just fit you but that sure is a crap shoot if you are a taller rider. Good bikes come in multiple frame sizes so you can get one that really fits.

You can find some really cheap disc brakes these days so don't think that because it has disc brakes it is better quality. Look up Zoom mechanical disc brakes on ebay. These are used on some of the cheapest bikes. You can get a complete set of calipers and rotors for $20. That's retail from a supplier in China. Bike builders don't pay retail. BTW caliper brakes will stop a bike quickly enough to make it skid and lose traction. That's all you need to stop fast.

Take your money and go looking for a used bike that originally came from a bike shop. You will get a lot more for your money if you make an informed choice and get one that fits you. That could be at a bike shop or on Craigslist. Just stay away from anything that came out of a mass merchandiser! You will spend more time riding and less time with a wrench trying to make it work right.
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Old 12-02-14, 02:04 AM
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I'll echo some of the other comments:

The $300 Target Schwinn is probably a serviceable entry-level bike, but for the same price, you could get a much higher quality used bike from and LBS, or for another $200 or so get an LBS brand name entry level bike that have a significantly upgraded component list from the Shimano Tourney and no-name parts I see on the Schwinn. Your LBS will also stand behind their product, new or used, and will make sure that everything works right before you leave the shop and will be able to provide service after the sale. You will also have a wider range of sizes in case 18" isn't an ideal fit.

If you have some basic assembly and maintenance skills, a boxed bike from an online retailer like Bikes Direct is another option that will get you a better bike at a decent price. Save up to 60% off new Mountain Bikes - MTB - Motobecane Fantom 29 SPORT. I've had good luck with BD but you will need to be able to set the bike up and adjust brakes, derailleurs, etc.

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Old 12-02-14, 09:26 AM
  #15  
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I think the target bike would be OK, but, like the rest have said here, you'd be much better off buying a bike from bikes direct.

Don't be afraid to put the bike together, it's super simple. There are many many videos on youtube that show you how to do it. Alternatively, you could buy a bike from BD then have the bike shop put it together and relube things.
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Old 12-02-14, 09:40 AM
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Your better bet is to search around on Craigslist or Bikes Direct.
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Old 12-02-14, 10:19 AM
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Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
I think the target bike would be OK, but, like the rest have said here, you'd be much better off buying a bike from bikes direct.

Don't be afraid to put the bike together, it's super simple. There are many many videos on youtube that show you how to do it. Alternatively, you could buy a bike from BD then have the bike shop put it together and relube things.
I assembled my BD bike with the help of youtube, but I would not say it was simple by any means, especially for someone doing it for the first time. Not to mention that the OP probably doesn't have the necessary tools to do the job properly: hex keys, chain whip, lock ring remover, spoke wrench, truing stand, BB tool, etc... I bought all these stuff (~ $200 extra) mainly because NYC bike shops charge a premium to assemble a BD bike (I called around and ask), and even after assembling it they charge you for subsequent tune-ups. I decided to buy the tools when it became clear to me that owning a BD bike meant I'll have to do my own tune-ups. If you do go the Bikes Direct (BD) route I'd recommend having it professionally assembled...as long as you're not taking it to a NYC bike shop it shouldn't cost more than $50-70.
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Old 12-02-14, 11:10 AM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by yankeefan View Post
I assembled my BD bike with the help of youtube, but I would not say it was simple by any means, especially for someone doing it for the first time. Not to mention that the OP probably doesn't have the necessary tools to do the job properly: hex keys, chain whip, lock ring remover, spoke wrench, truing stand, BB tool, etc... I bought all these stuff (~ $200 extra) mainly because NYC bike shops charge a premium to assemble a BD bike (I called around and ask), and even after assembling it they charge you for subsequent tune-ups. I decided to buy the tools when it became clear to me that owning a BD bike meant I'll have to do my own tune-ups. If you do go the Bikes Direct (BD) route I'd recommend having it professionally assembled...as long as you're not taking it to a NYC bike shop it shouldn't cost more than $50-70.
I've bought a bike from bikes direct. I had never assembled a bike before. Sure, I had allen wrenches, but I didn't have a chain whip, or truing stand. My wheels came perfectly true luckily. Even if they didn't, you can easily flip the bike over and use the fork as a truing stand. Wheels don't need to be 100% perfectly true. A spoke wrench is a few bucks at the LBS (and youtube videos are free), as well as a pedal wrench. You don't NEED anything else. Sure, it's RECOMMENDED, but it's not necessary. Like people said above, the bike comes 85% assembled. All you have to do is put the handlebars and possibly cranks on and you're good. I doubt if you took all the bearings apart on a BD bike you'd find them under lubed. Sure, you may want to replace the lube and repack the bearing, but again, not necessary.

Honestly OP, do yourself a favor. Learn to work on bikes and buy the recommended tools. You'll thank us later. I initially bought myself an app on my phone that showed videos on how to fix common problems. It was useful for about a month. Then you realize that bikes are really... really... simple. The only thing I haven't done is trued a wheel. Other than that, I've entirely rebuilt 3-4 bikes in my garage with no problems. That includes repacking bearings where needed. It's all nuts and bolts. It's not like a car where if you break one sensor you're going to be out multi hundreds of dollars. I'd even go so far to say it's difficult to break things permanently on a bike when working on them. Even if you screw something up, the LBS is generally right down the street to help you out.
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Old 12-02-14, 11:43 AM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
I've bought a bike from bikes direct. I had never assembled a bike before. Sure, I had allen wrenches, but I didn't have a chain whip, or truing stand. My wheels came perfectly true luckily. Even if they didn't, you can easily flip the bike over and use the fork as a truing stand. Wheels don't need to be 100% perfectly true. A spoke wrench is a few bucks at the LBS (and youtube videos are free), as well as a pedal wrench. You don't NEED anything else. Sure, it's RECOMMENDED, but it's not necessary. Like people said above, the bike comes 85% assembled. All you have to do is put the handlebars and possibly cranks on and you're good. I doubt if you took all the bearings apart on a BD bike you'd find them under lubed. Sure, you may want to replace the lube and repack the bearing, but again, not necessary.

Honestly OP, do yourself a favor. Learn to work on bikes and buy the recommended tools. You'll thank us later. I initially bought myself an app on my phone that showed videos on how to fix common problems. It was useful for about a month. Then you realize that bikes are really... really... simple. The only thing I haven't done is trued a wheel. Other than that, I've entirely rebuilt 3-4 bikes in my garage with no problems. That includes repacking bearings where needed. It's all nuts and bolts. It's not like a car where if you break one sensor you're going to be out multi hundreds of dollars. I'd even go so far to say it's difficult to break things permanently on a bike when working on them. Even if you screw something up, the LBS is generally right down the street to help you out.
There is a lot of variance in how bikes arrive when packaged and shipped. You and I could both order the same exact bike from BD and it'll arrive in entirely different conditions due to various idiosyncrasies and random occurrences along the distribution chain. I tore my BD bike down and yes it did come pre-greased but that didn't stop me from degreasing and repacking the bearings. I could have probably gone a couple hundreds of miles with the pre-installed grease but I figured after stripping down the bike I might as well grease it. I can't attest to what condition your bike arrived in but my wheels arrived dinged up (maybe UPS didn't handle the package with much care -- it's common for very large packages to get tossed around a bit), and my gears needed indexing and my brakes needed significant adjustments. I'm not debating whether or not assembling a bike is a DIY job; I'm simply saying that for someone with as limited bike experience as the OP, they will have problems distinguishing between something that looks like a properly functioning bike and something that actually is a properly functioning bike. I agree with the rest of your post; getting the tools and learning how to work on a bike is beneficial in the long run but in the short run I do not believe amateurishly slapping on the handlebars and front wheel on a BD bike straight out of the box is the best way to get proper mileage and longevity out of the bike. I'm not saying that your assembly job was amateurish but somebody contemplating buying a 40lb bike from Target is likely to do an amateurish job.
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Old 12-02-14, 04:17 PM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by yankeefan View Post
I assembled my BD bike with the help of youtube, but I would not say it was simple by any means, especially for someone doing it for the first time. Not to mention that the OP probably doesn't have the necessary tools to do the job properly: hex keys, chain whip, lock ring remover, spoke wrench, truing stand, BB tool, etc... I bought all these stuff (~ $200 extra) mainly because NYC bike shops charge a premium to assemble a BD bike (I called around and ask), and even after assembling it they charge you for subsequent tune-ups. I decided to buy the tools when it became clear to me that owning a BD bike meant I'll have to do my own tune-ups. If you do go the Bikes Direct (BD) route I'd recommend having it professionally assembled...as long as you're not taking it to a NYC bike shop it shouldn't cost more than $50-70.
Honest question here...I've never bought from BD, but do their wheels seriously come from the distributor so far out of whack that you need a truing stand?
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Old 12-02-14, 04:22 PM
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Originally Posted by kv501 View Post
Honest question here...I've never bought from BD, but do their wheels seriously come from the distributor so far out of whack that you need a truing stand?
My experience is no. And even if it was slightly untrue, your front fork and a few popsicle sticks would work just fine...
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Old 12-02-14, 05:10 PM
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Originally Posted by kv501 View Post
Honest question here...I've never bought from BD, but do their wheels seriously come from the distributor so far out of whack that you need a truing stand?
You can spin the wheels in the fork/rear dropouts and use your brake pads as a truing stand for minor alignment issues. My front wheel arrived with a noticeable wobble, so much so that I gave up on truing it myself and brought them to a bike shop for truing. It was my first time truing a wheel. My rear wheel was okay (slight bit of wobble but not un-rideable) straight out of the box.

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Old 12-02-14, 06:23 PM
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Originally Posted by kv501 View Post
Honest question here...I've never bought from BD, but do their wheels seriously come from the distributor so far out of whack that you need a truing stand?
I've built most of my own wheels without either a truing stand or dishing tool. It isn't hard to get a wheel to within 1/32" of completely true just holding the axle in one hand, spinning the wheel, and watching the rim as it spins past. Put the wheel on a bike and use the brake pads, and you can get it just as true as you can on a truing stand.
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Old 12-02-14, 06:49 PM
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I think the max. weight capacity makes it worth while...Maximum Weight Capacity: 2260.0 Lb. Impressive!
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Old 09-13-19, 06:04 AM
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Schwinn Circuit

We have 2 Schwinn Circuits we bought from Target and are happy with for the price. Shop around different Targets because prices vary store to store. We saw an Acension for $319 at one store and $349 at another. Get the Red card and get another 5% off as well. The Circuits have the same derailleur (Shimano Tourney) and disc brakes as the Ascension. For the money, these are features from more expensive bikes. The Trek FX-1 (about $450) has the Shimano Tourney and caliper brakes. You don’t see disc brakes much on bikes under $500. They are “mechanical” disc brakes vs hydraulic (on the Trek DS2 $669), and the hydraulic are so much better stopping and are not as loud. For the money, it seems to be a solid bike, but clearly not a Trek, Diamondback, Specialized, or Giant. Those all cost way more new. I’m actually looking at the same Ascension to maybe purchase by Christmas. We’re happy with our Schwinn Circuits for the money, but I want something I can ride in wet weather with wider tires, and some light off road. Someone mentioned buying used and we looked. You can get a 10 year old Trek or Specialized for $125-250, depending on condition. You’re going to pay another $200 for a tuneup, tires, and tubes, or $120 DIY for parts. We bought a Trek 820 used 10 or so years old, spent $65 on tires and tubes, $45 for grips, pedals, and chain oil. After riding it about 30 min, I realized that I would only be using the hardest 3 gears. We live in a pretty flat part of Texas. So, we’re keeping it as a guest bike. If you are truly “mountain biking” on dirt and lots of changing elevation like riding down a mountain with larger rocks, I’d pay the difference and get a bike with hydraulic brakes. If you are doing light trails, paved or gravel, not large rocks, then this bike is fine. Like a friend of mine says “Just how gonzo do you want to be?”

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