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My new $7,000 bike and the futility of justifying the price to the average person.

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My new $7,000 bike and the futility of justifying the price to the average person.

Old 04-17-16, 06:37 AM
  #401  
Paul Barnard
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An odd resurrection to an old thread. There is unquestionably a point of diminishing returns relative to price. Go from a $300 bike to a $600 bike and you will feel a substantial difference. Go from a $600 bike to a $1200 bike, and again you will feel a substantial difference. You'll feel a difference going from a $1200 bike to a $2400 bike, but that difference begins to diminish. Then again from a $2400 bike to a $4800 bike. Sam got called a troll, but based on my experience he is right. Find a closeout bike in that $1200-$2500 range and you'll have a darn fine bike. That's how I got my Tarmac. A $3K bike for $2K. Ultimately though, you need only justify the expense to yourself.
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Old 04-17-16, 07:17 AM
  #402  
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$7k spent on a bike ridiculousness is entirely dependent on income of said person with the income, not the person stating the ridiculousness. Value is dependent on cost over income. If you can spend $7k on a bike, more power to ya. At 4% of my income, my $600 bike is probably more valuable to me than a $7k bike to someone who can afford that. I would never spend $7k on a bike even if I did have a home of my own and had income that didn't all go to someone else for her vacations.

The justification is simply, I want it, I can afford it, I bought it. My mother was curious and asked me. Told her my bike was $600 and that's a relatively inexpensive bike. She thought that was ridiculous.

Personally, I think threads like these are just the OP tossing it out there on the forum, "Hey look at me and how much I spent on a bike" self back patting. No one here asked how much he spent on a bike (I know, thread is old) so why the reason to mention twice the money value plus mention how much was spent on a previous bike and put a link to the bike it's self.

Last edited by mrodgers; 04-17-16 at 07:22 AM.
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Old 04-17-16, 07:59 AM
  #403  
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Originally Posted by GravelMN View Post
I don't know about bypass but my stents (two about a year apart) went for about $35,000 each and the bills keep coming with follow ups and medications. My physicians say cycling may have saved my life and vastly improved my outcome. If I had started 30 years earlier, I could have possibly prevented or at least greatly delayed the need for stents. Even with good insurance I could have purchased a very high end bike with my out of pocket expense for two tiny wire tubes. When I started cycling I was looking at a $1,200 bike that was on sale for $899 and thought myself insane for considering it. Last week I spent that much on this month's installment on my medical bill. I still wouldn't likely spend $7,000 on a bike for myself, but I probably wasted several times more than that on the cheeseburgers, pizza and soda that contributed to my health problems. Heck, a vending machine soda once a day for 10 years adds up to around $4,500. IMHO, any money spent on cycling is a good investment.
This is probably the best answer so far...why do we question the price of a bicycle which does us some good, and then think nothing of the vast truck loads of junk purchased that harms us or does nothing good?


Personally, i feel it best to buy quality used and bless others with the rest. My family has need of things and giving to the Lord would lay up treasures in heaven.

Last edited by Duo; 04-18-16 at 06:40 AM.
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Old 04-17-16, 08:23 AM
  #404  
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Originally Posted by RoadTire View Post
Yep, no point trying to justify the cost of our bikes to anyone but ourselves. To a non-cycleinst even the price of big box bikes seems to be high.

Consider the initial cost of your wife's wedding ring somewhere in the ballpark of $569K / ounce, and at that rate, $154M for a 17 lb bike.

Yet my personal limits on bikes would be very high at $2K - I cannot justify a $7K bike. Heck, I hated paying $10K for a car. "Wow, nice bike! How much did you pay for that?" Shrug ... "can't really remember, 'bout 1/2 retail maybe." (No matter how I purchased it, always "half-retail maybe.."
You hated that price for a car?
That's after several recessions. You lucked out!!
"$10K" was a lot of money to pay for a car in the late 1960s.
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Old 04-17-16, 08:25 AM
  #405  
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Originally Posted by Duo View Post
This is probably the best answer so far...why do we question the price of a bicycle which does us some good, and then think nothing of the vast truck loads of junk purchased that harms us or does nothing good?

It may be that some need a 7k bike to motivate them. My bikes are used purchases, but new would be near the 1k level. Quality does make a difference and the price varies ie mine are used.

Both of my road bikes are touring bicycles, so i went after quality and durability. Since i live in BSO land, then it really doesn't matter to others what i ride...and no one cares. My local Trek shop had some decent entry level bikes on sale for 199 during an open house. They went fast as it was a huge mark down, but a different brand.

Sometimes i will try out a carbon demo at Trek, enjoy the ride but fail to see what the excitement is over the gear. Maybe i need to try harder, just can't seem to see why i 'need' such a thing.
Start managing a 'used bike shop.'
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Old 04-17-16, 08:28 AM
  #406  
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Originally Posted by OntheRun. View Post
Smoke weed and then go for a ride. Best thing ever.
Until a cop stops to harass. Giving a reason for the stop; citation.
Bike citations can get very expensive.
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Old 04-17-16, 08:32 AM
  #407  
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Originally Posted by Ray9 View Post
Sometimes you just have to go with what you've got. This might sound strange from someone who is shelling out a lot of money for a top-of-the-line bike but it makes sense to me. I can't stop the aging process and I certainly know that I am not immortal. Back in 1972 when I watched Frank shorter win the Olympic marathon a light bulb lit up in my brain illuminating what had previously just been air. It changed my life. I began running in a pair of department store sneakers and I ran for five years before I saw another runner. People used to stop and ask me if I needed a ride. I can still remember my first pair of running shoes (brooks) the only brand the store had in my size. I ran my first race in 1979, a fourth of July five miler. The race had 75 runners. I finished 9th in 28:14. Funny how these things crystalize in your memory. I went on to become a five minute miler by 1985.

I knew nothing about cycling except that in 1983 I sustained a stress fracture and was told not to run for 8 weeks. I rode a Montgomery Ward bicycle to maintain my weight, cooking the bottom bracket and seizing the headset before throwing it in the trash. It was then that I realized quality was a factor in cycling. The cycling did its job and I went on to several personal records in 1983 and was even the overall winner in two races. I was married and raising a family so I could not afford a good bike in those days. I did some triathlons in the late 80's on a borrowed bike that was about five sizes too big and did well although I almost drowned. I bought a used Peugeot from a friend in 1990 that was only about 3 sizes too big and joined a local cycling club.

I can vividly recall my first group riding experience. It went something like this: "Look moron, when you pull through in a pace line you don't take off so the next guy has to kill himself trying to catch you!" I still had that every-man-for-himself runner's mentality as well as the idiotic belief that runners were superior to cyclists. I eventually made the transition to cycling and got my first good bike in 1991, a Cannondale R800, $1,000, Still have it. Only one size too big. I raced and crashed this bike a lot and realized that just staying in the peloton was huge in cycling.

In 2006 I stopped doing everything. By 2008 I was 20 pounds heavier and feeling my age-61. I bought my Cannodale Six-13 in 2008 with Mavic Kyserium wheels and Dura Ace shifting for about $2,500. I would take the entire winter off, gain ten pounds and then lose it again only to gain it back the next winter. So this year I'm training like an athlete on a Sole LCR recumbent stationary. Don't let anyone tell you recumbent trainers don't work because they do and they are kind to your back and crotch. I also have a Cycelops fluid trainer on my Cannondale R800.

I'm going to be 68 in a few weeks. I cannot stop the clock but I can slow it down. I still work because my wife lost her insurance so we put her on mine until she is old enough to retire. I am highly skilled and make a good living though I would really like to just ride my bike. I bought the new bike because it makes sense to have a good bike now that I plan to ride until it gets dark every day, 50-60 miles and then maybe 70-80 miles on Sunday. This is me. this is what I want to do and I feel good about it. It's definitely worth it.
How many gears did the 'Montgomery Ward bicycle' have?
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Old 04-17-16, 08:37 AM
  #408  
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
Uh, the average bike shop employee doesn't make a whole lot of money, yours or anybody else's. And that owner who does get your money is thinking something like "Finally got that $3500 window dressing (cost to him) out of here. Now I can pay the rent."

I'm sure you have heard the surefire way to make a small fortune. Start with a large one and buy a bike shop.

Ben
What level of bike shops have you been working in?
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Old 04-17-16, 09:22 AM
  #409  
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
My $120, 30 year old Peugeot got me through a charity ride last year faster than a group of about a dozen similarly kitted out riders on Cervelos. My $27, nearly 40 year old Schwinn (with steel rims in the rain), did the same to quite a few carbon fibres on another ride last September. Turns out the prospect of empty beer lines get me to the end quicker than those on bikes weighing 20# less than mine.

The longer I live, the more I am amazed at people who refuse to accept others can live perfectly happy lives without the same values placed on possessions and experiences as their own. I value, perhaps FAR more, seeing what I can do with old things than thinking dropping some dollar value will make me a better biker. Personally, to the OP, I think spending $7k on a bike to be ridiculous, but the OP's money is not my own, and if that is what they spend it on to make them happy, I am glad for them.
^Yes!

I'd look at that old Schwinn as something which has character, and as a challenge. Something to motivate me to pedal a little harder, and thus make me a better cyclist (And something I can blame when I realize that I am not very fast! )

When I had my Venge, it was like: "O-K, this is about as good a bike as I'll ever have....yet I am no faster, and the hills no easier, than on any other bike I've ever ridden".

All a bicycle is, is a couple of wheels and some cogs and a chain, held together by a frame. No matter what materials you make the parts out of, and no matter how much they cost....that's all any bike is. The magic is in how we ride them, and our own perceptions.

I'd find thaty old Schwinn more interesting than the Venge that I had. The Venge had all sorts of philosophy/research/development behind it, but other than being a few pounds lighter than the Schwinn, it couldn't of itself do anything that the Schwinn couldn't do. I guess maybe if I were the kind of person who buys into all the hype- "This here Venge is aerodynamically designed and tests in a wind tunnel blah blah blah....carbon fiber blah blah blah....internal cables blah..." my perception of the Venge may have been different- but I am a realist- and ultimately, the Venge did what any other bike does- what my $59 childhood Ross did; what various BSOs I've owned in times past did; what the Schwinn does: You pedal it, and it goes.

The Schwinn is more honest. It doesn't make any pretensions. It's likely been around for 40 years, and probably has not been treated gingerly all it's life; and will probably be around 40 years from now, as well. The steel and few extra pounds probably give it a ride/road feel that no bike of any price can match today. For the weight penalty, you get the solid feel in all the components of real metal; the peace of mind that the bike will not asplode or be ruined if you ride over a curb or pot-hole; and the freedom to just be able to ride, without having to worry about your bike. IMO, a bike should not be a delicate precision instrument...it should be a vehicle for the real world. It's like the difference between a light flimsy Toyota Corolla and a big old Cadillac- only in the cycling world, you pay a lot more for the Corolla.

My7 ex-Venge would look like a piece of plastic crap next to a shiny old Schwinn.
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Old 04-17-16, 12:59 PM
  #410  
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If you're going around telling people who don't ride how much you paid for your bike, it's going to come across as bragging. No amount of explanation will justify your purchase to people who think you're bragging.
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Old 04-17-16, 01:53 PM
  #411  
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Can't believe I read all this.

Two guaranteed internet behaviors in these threads, and this one did not disappoint on either front- 1) without knowing anyone else's priorities & financial situation, telling each other how they should value and budget purchases, & 2)... car analogies!

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Old 04-17-16, 02:16 PM
  #412  
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Most will agree that this is a bragging thread. Where the brag fails is 68 and still working. Should be out riding the bike!
I don't see this as a bragging thread . $7k is not the most expensive bike on the market these days . I am looking at a Colnago C60 which costs $6k alone . Campagnolo Super record EPS $4k . I know lot of people here think its crazy to spend this kind of money on a bike but that is fine with me . The only person I have to justify to is my wife .
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Old 04-17-16, 05:49 PM
  #413  
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
Spending $7000 dollars on a bicycle is futility... I could easily purchase 4-5 different bikes with that amount of money, instead of wasting all that money on just one bike, and I would still have some change left to buy many cases of beer. I bet all the LBS employees are having a great big laugh amongst themselves every time they sell such an expensive bike to somebody.
That's a shallow opinion. My bike is my daily driver. I'm on that thing more than anything else. It needs to be durable, reliable, comfortable, capable of hauling loads, going fast going slow, going through snow...I could spend $25k plus insurance plus gas for a car that will last me half as long as a $7k bike. Or, I can be stupid, and pedal cheap crappy BSOs that suck to ride and last maybe a year. If you want to go for the latter, do it, but it sounds like the decision of a high-schooler.
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Old 04-17-16, 08:32 PM
  #414  
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You wanted the bike more than the money. Done.
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Old 04-17-16, 09:10 PM
  #415  
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
My $120, 30 year old Peugeot got me through a charity ride last year faster than a group of about a dozen similarly kitted out riders on Cervelos. My $27, nearly 40 year old Schwinn (with steel rims in the rain), did the same to quite a few carbon fibres on another ride last September. Turns out the prospect of empty beer lines get me to the end quicker than those on bikes weighing 20# less than mine.

I knew when I wrote $250 amount there would be someone who would challenge it. I was referring to buying a NEW bike and not a used bike. My friend that gives me that argument is saying that buying a new Walmart bike is just as good as buying a new Lynskey for example.
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Old 04-17-16, 10:28 PM
  #416  
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Originally Posted by Paul Barnard View Post
An odd resurrection to an old thread. There is unquestionably a point of diminishing returns relative to price. Go from a $300 bike to a $600 bike and you will feel a substantial difference. Go from a $600 bike to a $1200 bike, and again you will feel a substantial difference. You'll feel a difference going from a $1200 bike to a $2400 bike, but that difference begins to diminish. Then again from a $2400 bike to a $4800 bike. Sam got called a troll, but based on my experience he is right. Find a closeout bike in that $1200-$2500 range and you'll have a darn fine bike. That's how I got my Tarmac. A $3K bike for $2K. Ultimately though, you need only justify the expense to yourself.
Too bad it took 17 pages to have someone explain "marginal cost"
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Old 04-17-16, 10:36 PM
  #417  
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Originally Posted by Stucky View Post
^Yes!

I'd look at that old Schwinn as something which has character, and as a challenge. Something to motivate me to pedal a little harder, and thus make me a better cyclist (And something I can blame when I realize that I am not very fast! )
I've actually got a much more pragmatic reason: I bought the Peugeot, and found out I couldn't fit anything but skinny tires on it. I wanted to ride gravel/dirt/limestone trails comfortably, found the Schwinn that fit me one day, and bought it to do exactly that with the Paselas I had sitting around that I had bought for the Peugeot! Of course, I love the fact it does have that character and gets looks ranging from longing remembrance to wild bemusement, and while some people get their pleasure from having the best things their money can buy, as I said earlier I love seeing what I can make things that other people don't want do!

Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
I knew when I wrote $250 amount there would be someone who would challenge it. I was referring to buying a NEW bike and not a used bike. My friend that gives me that argument is saying that buying a new Walmart bike is just as good as buying a new Lynskey for example.
True, but neither of those bikes were exactly the top of the line bikes of their day. The Peugeot possibly more than the Schwinn, but neither were in the top half of their catalogs, or anywhere near to the OPs price point. It is a point I like to refute as often as possible, you don't need a top of the line bike to go out and enjoy yourself. When I got back into biking last spring, I almost said screw it and gave up, exactly because no LBS wanted to sell me a bike under four digits. Substitute any of the sub-$300 Bikes Direct downtube shifter bikes, and in all likelihood I have the same experience as I've had with my current bikes.

I'm certainly not arguing that a more expensive bike isn't better depending on the paritcular application, just that for my enjoyment, it is not necessary. I can't maximize the potential of the bikes I have, until I can do that buying something better is not worth spending my money on. FWIW, I have this argument with other hockey players (i.e., my brother) all the time, too, the limiting factor on my $15 wood stick is my abilities, not the materials of the stick, going out and spending seven times as much on a carbon stick is silly to me.

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Old 04-17-16, 11:47 PM
  #418  
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
What if you like to ride bikes, smoke weed, and drink beer?
Guessing he would have to buy a cheaper bike in that case. And of course the price of bicycle would have to depend on what kind of beer and if it is Mexican or the nice Canadian BC bud weed. hehe
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Old 04-18-16, 04:54 AM
  #419  
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
I've actually got a much more pragmatic reason: I bought the Peugeot, and found out I couldn't fit anything but skinny tires on it. I wanted to ride gravel/dirt/limestone trails comfortably, found the Schwinn that fit me one day, and bought it to do exactly that with the Paselas I had sitting around that I had bought for the Peugeot! Of course, I love the fact it does have that character and gets looks ranging from longing remembrance to wild bemusement, and while some people get their pleasure from having the best things their money can buy, as I said earlier I love seeing what I can make things that other people don't want do!



True, but neither of those bikes were exactly the top of the line bikes of their day. The Peugeot possibly more than the Schwinn, but neither were in the top half of their catalogs, or anywhere near to the OPs price point. It is a point I like to refute as often as possible, you don't need a top of the line bike to go out and enjoy yourself. When I got back into biking last spring, I almost said screw it and gave up, exactly because no LBS wanted to sell me a bike under four digits. Substitute any of the sub-$300 Bikes Direct downtube shifter bikes, and in all likelihood I have the same experience as I've had with my current bikes.

I'm certainly not arguing that a more expensive bike isn't better depending on the paritcular application, just that for my enjoyment, it is not necessary. I can't maximize the potential of the bikes I have, until I can do that buying something better is not worth spending my money on. FWIW, I have this argument with other hockey players (i.e., my brother) all the time, too, the limiting factor on my $15 wood stick is my abilities, not the materials of the stick, going out and spending seven times as much on a carbon stick is silly to me.
You do have to remember that even middle of the line bikes, like the one you have and the Schwinn which back in those days was just above low end were built better and they lasted a very long time. Though with the Schwinn I would seriously get rid of those steel rims due to the safety issue in the rain, you can get aluminum rims for about $300 for the pair and if you look long enough I've seen them for as low as $150. Not only would the AL rims be safer when wet but you would lose a lot of rotational weight which is the most important weight to lose in regards to performance.
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Old 04-18-16, 05:01 AM
  #420  
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Originally Posted by Doohickie View Post
If you're going around telling people who don't ride how much you paid for your bike, it's going to come across as bragging. No amount of explanation will justify your purchase to people who think you're bragging.
Well I’ll try to ‘splain. I previously posted to this thread,’Do you tell strangers how much your bike costs?”

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
For years, I rode a steel Bridgestone RB-1, costing about $650 down from about $800 as an end-of-year model when I bought it in the early 1980’s…

The Bridgestone was totaled in 2012 in an accident from which I was not sure I would ride again. Well I did, and decided to get a CF. My trusted mechanic said here’s the bike you want, knowing my riding style. Well the MSRP was $8000, but he got it for me at half off.

Now, considering the attitude most non- or occasional cyclists towards bicycles and prices, I’m frankly somewhat embarrassed to admit to paying so much, sounding like some over-the-top conspicuous consumption. Personally, I can afford it, and it was an offer I could not refuse. Cycling is that important to me and I’m fortunate to be able to continue the lifestyle, so that puts it in perspective for me.

I’m not that conversant with the technical specifics, nor may anyone asking the price, so the price becomes a common reference to tell what a fine piece of machinery it is. But I would nonetheless admit the price only to a close acquaintance in serious conversation.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I replied on this [different] thread candidly, and in isolation of my own wants to this query to the values of an expensive bike:

Originally Posted by sam_cyclist View Post
So, how would you rate the [$7000] bike assuming you've ridden it a fair bit by now?

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
That’s a good question, and I have in the past considered the answer for my own bike; at least 9/10. FYA:…Nonetheless, bragging rights are also fun.

I added that last remark to tweak the naysayers that “bike snobs” only buy high-end bikes as conspicuous consumption.

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 04-18-16 at 05:04 AM.
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Old 04-18-16, 08:21 AM
  #421  
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
You do have to remember that even middle of the line bikes, like the one you have and the Schwinn which back in those days was just above low end were built better and they lasted a very long time. Though with the Schwinn I would seriously get rid of those steel rims due to the safety issue in the rain, you can get aluminum rims for about $300 for the pair and if you look long enough I've seen them for as low as $150. Not only would the AL rims be safer when wet but you would lose a lot of rotational weight which is the most important weight to lose in regards to performance.
Oh, they are atrocious in the rain, that charity ride was in a downpour. I've got a set of old alloy wheels I got off CL for $5 that'll go on it if they don't end up being used for another project. I'd love to have an unlimited bike budget, but I have many hobbies, bikes only get a slice of my spare cash.

The way I look at it, if someone thinks they'll never need a bike that costs more than $250, one of three things are relevant: 1) they aren't going to ride it, or any bike, with any frequency and spending more is silly, 2) they ride it and are happy, and if it is meeting their needs, why would you spend more to get something better, or 3) they ride it, hit a wall in its abilities, and then go buy something better that suits their needs.

Everyone is different in what they value. I still ride my mountain bike that I got for Christmas going on 20 years ago from Dicks Sporting Goods, I'd be surprised if that cost my parents $200 at the time. The frame is probably a bit small, it is far heavier than MTBs today, but it works and I'm happy on it, I've simply got no reason to go out and spend money to get something better at this point.
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Old 04-18-16, 08:49 AM
  #422  
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Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
Too bad it took 17 pages to have someone explain "marginal cost"
I made the argument about the knee in the cost curve and diminishing marginal returns 10 pages back, about a year ago.

Last edited by D1andonlyDman; 04-18-16 at 08:53 AM.
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Old 04-18-16, 08:57 AM
  #423  
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Diminishing marginal utility and marginal cost aren't quite the same same thing. In this instance, the relevant question isn't really whether the bike is worth $7k in a vacuum, but really whether the op can explain why it's worth over twice as much as a $3k bike. I've put down a few miles in my day and once bikes get past about the $3k mark, I struggle to find any additional benefits that would justify increased cost. It may just be that I don't know any better because I don't have the experience to appreciate features that a pro bike would have.
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Old 04-18-16, 09:14 AM
  #424  
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
I've actually got a much more pragmatic reason: I bought the Peugeot, and found out I couldn't fit anything but skinny tires on it. I wanted to ride gravel/dirt/limestone trails comfortably, found the Schwinn that fit me one day, and bought it to do exactly that with the Paselas I had sitting around that I had bought for the Peugeot! Of course, I love the fact it does have that character and gets looks ranging from longing remembrance to wild bemusement, and while some people get their pleasure from having the best things their money can buy, as I said earlier I love seeing what I can make things that other people don't want do!


I'm the same way. I don't want the latest-greatest "best money can buy"- I want things which are durable and of good quality, and which do what I want them to do, without being festooned with a lot of extra junk which I don't need. It's getting to the point where only old stuff fits my criteria.

Heck, my two tractors are 25 years old now (bought used, more recently) and I view them as "late model"
For a riding mower, I have a 1970 Cub Cadet.
My vehicles are 1998 & 1999.
I have an easy chair which I found in the garbage (Still had the tags on it- sitting next to a dumpster- Looks like someone had cleaned-out their deceased relative's apartment...)

Back in the 90's I had a car that I paid $125 for, and drove for 2 years! Not because I couldn't afford more...but because I liked it; it did what I needed it to do; and like yourself, I took pleasure in knowing that I could get good use out of something that someone else was throwing away, and it was fun seeing how long I could keep it going without spending any money on it. Heck, I wish I still had that '79 LeSabre!


Sadly, the area where I live now, people tend to buy crap- and even if they have something good, you can bet they'll use it fully up before selling it or otherwise getting rid of it- so it's slim pickings now, and for the first time in my life, I'm being forced to buy a lot of things brand-new- and quite frankly, I enjoyed things more when I was able to get most things used, or from a scrap pile or even from a dumpster.

HAhaha! This just made me think: I used to know this old man (Ironically, he was the person who taught me to ride a bike when I was a kid!) who used to go gem-picking at a scrap-metal place. He'd refer to the scrap place as his "warehouse"- If you needed a part for a lawn-mower, or a tool or just about anything made of metal, he'd say "Let me see if I can come across something at my warehouse" -I still have some ancient Milwaukee power tools he resuscitated from that place! And back when he was still alive, if you needed a lawn-mower, ...just let him know- He'd find some ancient relic at "the warehouse"- which he'd resuscitate, usually with only minor work- and you'd have a sturdy 20 year old mower- and quite frankly, I'd enjoy mowing with such a mower 100 times more than with some plasticky fancy new one. The guy was like a white Fred Sanford- in fact, his name was even Fred! Having known the guy since I was about 5 years old, you might say that I was brought up around the re-use it/recycle mentality- and it completely suits me. I feel like a tool when I'm forced to bnuy something new, because it seems that I'm paying a high price for something that isn't half as good as something from "the warehouse" .

With the old stuff, it's fun to see how long you can keep it going. It's near the end of it's life, but with a little knowledge and care, if it was made well to begin with (as many old things were) you might well get another 10 or 15 years out of it. With new stuff, you expect it to last a long time bec ause it's brand new; cost good money; has a good reputation; and you're the only owner, so it's never abused.....and then you're disappointed when it craps-out sooner than something from "the warehouse" (purchased for the price of scrap metal according to what it weighs...) would have!
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Old 04-18-16, 09:21 AM
  #425  
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Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
Diminishing marginal utility and marginal cost aren't quite the same same thing. In this instance, the relevant question isn't really whether the bike is worth $7k in a vacuum, but really whether the op can explain why it's worth over twice as much as a $3k bike. I've put down a few miles in my day and once bikes get past about the $3k mark, I struggle to find any additional benefits that would justify increased cost. It may just be that I don't know any better because I don't have the experience to appreciate features that a pro bike would have.
That's actually the argument I made 10 pages ago last year. Diminishing marginal utility relative to incremental cost increases. You characterized the earlier post as being an explanation of marginal cost - which isn't exactly what it was.
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