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Trouble fitting my bike

Old 04-27-15, 03:52 PM
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Trouble fitting my bike

I know there is a subforum dedicated to fitting, but it seems pretty dead there, and since this is a hybrid bike I'm hoping to get more help here.

I got a Jamis Allegro from my neighbor who had to move. It is a 17" frame, and I'm about 5'7 so I'm right in the ballpark. I never had a problem fitting bikes that were within my size until now. The problem is I'm putting too much weight on my hands. I had the same problem with my previous bike (Sirrus), but with the Sirrus all I had to do was slide the saddle back a bit and tilt the nose up few degrees. Once I did that the problem was instantly solved, and I could even slam the stem without discomfort. I did the same with my Jamis, handlebar set up high, and while it did help somewhat, I'm still feeling the weight. The two bikes supposedly have the same effective top tube length, so this is totally baffling to me. What am I doing wrong?
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Old 04-28-15, 08:32 AM
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I suspect your problem is your sitting position. Can you sit on your seat without sliding forward or backward? Start by levelling the seat, until you can stay anywhere easily.
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Old 04-28-15, 08:40 AM
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Is the stem height lower?
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Old 04-28-15, 11:14 AM
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It can make all the difference in the world to get those handlebars 2" to 4" above the seat height, especially if your hands are bothering you. Different stems, risers, and shims are all available to get the job done.
My own revelation into riding comfort came last summer when I realized my body likes to ride stretched out but not stretched down. With a riser, I got my bars up 3.5" above the seat height and then bought a set back seat post to give me a nice extension. I'm an old rider who has biked off and on throughout my life and I have never been so comfortable on a bike.
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Old 04-28-15, 11:55 AM
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If the seat is way up to get enough leg extension then the handlebars may be too low. Another stem could help.
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Old 04-29-15, 10:42 AM
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Anyone?
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Old 04-29-15, 12:12 PM
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The Specialized certainly looks like a more aggressive set up so I would have assumed that it would have given you hand problems, not the other way around. I think that hand problems tend to come when the handlebar is a little too far away thus putting more weight on your hands than your seat. To alleviate that problem, I would normally suggest a combination of moving the seat closer to the handlebar or raising the handlebar by moving the spacers. The third suggestion I would have made is to get a pair of Ergon-type grips but it looks like this bike has them. (maybe adjust the angle of the grip?) Since none of my conventional wisdom seems appropriate, how about trying to duplicate the Specialized by getting the seat and handlebar heights the same as well as the distance from seat to handlebar.
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Old 05-01-15, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by chipndale9
The bike is currently set up similar to this:



The handlebar is about as high as it could go. You can see the drop is close to even, maybe the handlebar slightly above the seat. I know a higher degree stem or riser is an option but spending extra money is my last option. I'm not even sure if I want to ride that upright. Assuming I'm properly fit I should be comfortable no matter what the handlebar position is, no?

How come I was comfortable riding this? (really miss this bike)

My first guess is that you are too stretched out on the bike because the stem is too long or the frame is too big. The only inexpensive fix with that bike I think is another stem.
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Old 05-01-15, 10:41 AM
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Counter-intuitively, feeling like you have too much weight on your hands does not necessarily mean you are leaning too far forward, although that is what everyone, myself included, automatically assumes. If your reach isn't far enough and/or is too low, thats when you end up with your weight over the bars and not between them and the seat where it belongs. Assuming a hypothetical balanced posture on bike A, if reach is shorter on bike B, stack needs to be higher and seat moved forward (relative to the cranks). If you continue getting shorter/higher/closer to the cranks, you eventually end up in a comfort cruiser geometry. Conversely if reach on bike C is longer than A, stack will need to get lower and seat will need to go back to maintain relative body balance...which at the extreme results in the familiar road/race geometry.

Guessing you dont have the old bike handy to take real world measurements off of...pity as precious few manufacturers give us meaningful geometry data (effective top tube, seat tube, head tube are all boarder-line meaningless without the critical reach and stack figures) so its all but impossible now to know how your body posture differed on the two bikes.

This is purely anecdotal, but from what you've said I would guess that the current bike's reach is shorter or its stack is lower (or some combination of the two). Only through experimentation will you figure out which. A decent LBS should have a box full of stems for you to try, ideally for a day or two for it to be truly meaningful, or offer a generous return policy.

Last edited by Sunsanvil; 05-01-15 at 11:23 AM.
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Old 05-02-15, 08:58 AM
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Thanks for the help. I'm going to try with different stems to see if it makes a difference.
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