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So, what are the disadvantages?

Old 07-21-15, 11:47 AM
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one4smoke
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So, what are the disadvantages?

I have heard many say they are given advice NOT to purchase a bike with a front suspension. I understand the drawbacks of having a front suspension on a bike that you primarily ride on the road or paved trails, but what are the disadvantages when that front suspension has a lockout?
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Old 07-21-15, 11:51 AM
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Weight, complexity, and cost. You are paying for that suspension fork, when you could put your money into a bike with better components, or just save a couple of hundred bucks. As for weight, a suspension fork will be at least a pound or three heavier than a solid fork. And over time, you do have to account for wear and tear as a suspension fork is a moving part. Barring a bad crash, a solid fork requires no maintenance.

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Old 07-21-15, 12:12 PM
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
Weight, complexity, and cost. You are paying for that suspension fork, when you could put your money into a bike with better components, or just save a couple of hundred bucks. As for weight, a suspension fork will be at least a pound or three heavier than a solid fork. And over time, you do have to account for wear and tear as a suspension fork is a moving part. Barring a bad crash, a solid fork requires no maintenance.
So is it a foregone conclusion, it's better to need it and not have it, than it is to have it and not need it?
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Old 07-21-15, 12:22 PM
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Think about that a suspension fork is around 3.5 or 4 pounds more instead the 0.75 pound of a rigid one (less if is carbon fiber). Hibrids aren't CicloCross nor MTB machines. Their main surface is tarmac or hard dirt surfaces ('gravel bikes').

With composite forks you have somewhat dampening due to the flexibility of the fork (handlebar included too). No need to deal with springs, air and oils for hybrid bikes.
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Old 07-21-15, 12:27 PM
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I think if the speed/weight considerations really don't impact you, it's definitely better to have the suspension fork. I haven't ridden rough surfaces on my Roam nearly as much as I thought I would, but locking out the fork is easy enough to do. I'll likely be purchasing narrower tires as well, so as it turned out for my primary purpose, something like an Escape or FX might have been a better choice, but there's still nothing wrong with my Roam for my uses. Some people really grow to dislike their suspension forks however. You'll have to decide where you fall on that spectrum, and definitely ride both. I'd say a carbon fork is a definite improvement in most scenarios over a suspension fork, while aluminum (less vibration absorption) or steel (heavy weight, no additional shock absorption) may not be.
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Old 07-21-15, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by mwl001 View Post
I think if the speed/weight considerations really don't impact you, it's definitely better to have the suspension fork. I haven't ridden rough surfaces on my Roam nearly as much as I thought I would, but locking out the fork is easy enough to do. I'll likely be purchasing narrower tires as well, so as it turned out for my primary purpose, something like an Escape or FX might have been a better choice, but there's still nothing wrong with my Roam for my uses. Some people really grow to dislike their suspension forks however. You'll have to decide where you fall on that spectrum, and definitely ride both. I'd say a carbon fork is a definite improvement in most scenarios over a suspension fork, while aluminum (less vibration absorption) or steel (heavy weight, no additional shock absorption) may not be.
If I ever want to replace my suspension fork on my Roam 2 with a carbon fork, what kind of cost would I be looking at?
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Old 07-21-15, 12:41 PM
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Probably $300+, half the cost or so of a new bike with a carbon fork more geared toward road riding with components similar to you roam. Just google "suspension corrected carbon fork".
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Old 07-21-15, 12:52 PM
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The lockout on the suspension forks on two of my mountain bikes doesn't lock the forks out completely. There's still some movement. That may or may not be a consideration for people deciding on suspension or rigid.

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Old 07-21-15, 12:54 PM
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
Weight, complexity, and cost. You are paying for that suspension fork, when you could put your money into a bike with better components, or just save a couple of hundred bucks. As for weight, a suspension fork will be at least a pound or three heavier than a solid fork. And over time, you do have to account for wear and tear as a suspension fork is a moving part. Barring a bad crash, a solid fork requires no maintenance.
...pure balderdash, I tire of your VERY opinionated views, try accepting that there are other points of view than your own...!!! To the OP, many of us here on the hybrid forum have suspension forks on our bikes and are delighted with them. And to mister MRT2, I've ridden bikes of ALL types, road, MTB, drop bar, flat bar, old cruisers, and both types of forks including the fanciest CF forks. So I DO have some experience to draw my own opinions from. BUT, I'm not going to convince you otherwise as you've already made up your own mind despite what the facts may be...
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Old 07-21-15, 01:05 PM
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Originally Posted by one4smoke View Post
I have heard many say they are given advice NOT to purchase a bike with a front suspension. I understand the drawbacks of having a front suspension on a bike that you primarily ride on the road or paved trails, but what are the disadvantages when that front suspension has a lockout?
Hi one4smoke,

I have a new 2015 Specialized Crosstrail Comp, it has a remotely operated lockout on the handlebars, with the shock locked I can feel no discernible up and down motion while riding. I made a mark on the shock tube itself using a soft pencil and could not see any apparent movement. When turned on where I use it over rougher surfaces due to having bad wrists, it is a definite advantage for me. You're going to find that when you ask this question you'll hear from both the lovers and the haters, and the haters are very vociferous in their opposition to anything other that a straight blade fork, preferable a carbon fiber one at that...
...over the years I've had three bikes with front shocks and I can tell you that it does make a difference have one that is of higher quality. An entry level shock won't have the control that you seem to be looking for. Let's see if you can hear from some of the other hybrid riders who have the same positive experience that I have had...

cheers, enjoy your ride!
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Old 07-21-15, 01:16 PM
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Originally Posted by one4smoke View Post
So is it a foregone conclusion, it's better to need it and not have it, than it is to have it and not need it?
It depends on what you mean by need?
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Old 07-21-15, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by trainchaser View Post
...pure balderdash, I tire of your VERY opinionated views, try accepting that there are other points of view than your own...!!! To the OP, many of us here on the hybrid forum have suspension forks on our bikes and are delighted with them. And to mister MRT2, I've ridden bikes of ALL types, road, MTB, drop bar, flat bar, old cruisers, and both types of forks including the fanciest CF forks. So I DO have some experience to draw my own opinions from. BUT, I'm not going to convince you otherwise as you've already made up your own mind despite what the facts may be...
Ease up on the personal attacks. This is a forum where people post their opinions. And besides, what part of my earlier post is factually incorrect? Weight, cost or complexity?
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Old 07-21-15, 04:03 PM
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
It depends on what you mean by need?
I primarily ride on paved roads or trails 98% of the time. But... there's that 2% where my 10 year old son (who has a MB) will want to go ride the park hills (grass) or some dirt trails, etc... Also, the greenways where I ride have the rickety wooden bridges and so forth. I must say, I really like or "need" the front suspension in these situations. But, with the exception of the greenway bridges, the other situations are few and far between. That's why I decided on the Giant Roam 2 with the lockout. Have a stiff front fork when I need it, AND have a working suspension when I need it.
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Old 07-21-15, 05:09 PM
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I have a Sirrus with a carbon fork,, and really like it. The carbon fork really is better than aluminum or steel. It's easier to go fast on.

I have A Crosstrail with a lockout front fork (suspension) and I really like it. It likes to go fast, too, but more comfortably. It's a great do it all bike!

If one had to go, I'd keep the Crosstrail................. and, other than brakes, tires, and other consumables, it has been trouble free for over 36,000 miles.

(I do keep my bikes cleaned and lubricated)

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Old 07-21-15, 05:47 PM
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Originally Posted by trainchaser View Post
Hi one4smoke,

I have a new 2015 Specialized Crosstrail Comp, it has a remotely operated lockout on the handlebars, with the shock locked I can feel no discernible up and down motion while riding. I made a mark on the shock tube itself using a soft pencil and could not see any apparent movement. When turned on where I use it over rougher surfaces due to having bad wrists, it is a definite advantage for me. You're going to find that when you ask this question you'll hear from both the lovers and the haters, and the haters are very vociferous in their opposition to anything other that a straight blade fork, preferable a carbon fiber one at that...
...over the years I've had three bikes with front shocks and I can tell you that it does make a difference have one that is of higher quality. An entry level shock won't have the control that you seem to be looking for. Let's see if you can hear from some of the other hybrid riders who have the same positive experience that I have had...

cheers, enjoy your ride!
Thanks for the insight!
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Old 07-21-15, 05:59 PM
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I bought a used mtb with a suspension fork that didn't lock out. Obviously that was a mistake. It sucked on pavement and really absorbed a lot of energy. I think the wider tires would have done as much for dampening effect. That experience soured me on suspension forks (unfairly), but I wonder if they're really needed on gravel roads. I know if I was on trails where there are roots and ruts and rocks, then a suspension fork would probably be a requirement.
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Old 07-21-15, 07:16 PM
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Originally Posted by trainchaser View Post
I tire of your VERY opinionated views
Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
This is a forum where people post their opinions.
Not having a go but if you don't like someone's opinion just ignore it. Save you a lot of stress.

Opinions are like ar$eholes, everyone has one and think theirs doesn't stink. On a forum like this we're all "experts". Welcome to the interwebz

Me I like my front suspension on my DS as it suits MY PERSONAL needs and requirements; where I ride, how I ride etc....

Just MY opinion

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Old 07-21-15, 07:35 PM
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due to back and neck issues I found that there is really no substitute for a suspension fork.
I have ridden expensive 'endurance" type carbon road bikes costing thousands of dollars.
They do not dampen road bumps nearly as well as my 600.00 cannondale adventure 2 with
its low end suspension fork and seatpost. For me it's either ride suspension hybrids or drive a car.
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Old 07-21-15, 09:19 PM
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
Ease up on the personal attacks. This is a forum where people post their opinions. And besides, what part of my earlier post is factually incorrect? Weight, cost or complexity?
I extend you my apology, yes people post their opinions, and you are a very frequent poster on many of the forums - yes I read more than just the hybrid forum - but you may not realize how often your opinions are proffered as 'facts'. There are reasons that suspension forks exist, and many riders benefit greatly from them, and many, like myself and others in this same thread prefer them and have had no maintenance issues at all, no problems with complexity, and they came included with our bikes at no extra cost to us. You obviously don't like them, you prefer a solid fork and that is wonderful because there are some truly amazing solid forks out there, I know because I've ridden many bikes that have them. But just because you don't personally like suspension forks don't issue misinformation that comes across as quite condescending. Again, sorry for my earlier reply.

cheers, and enjoy your ride...
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Old 07-22-15, 06:31 AM
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I've got a Trek 8.3 DS which is the first model in their lineup to have hydraulic lockout on the suspension fork.

Sure, it's a little heavier than a carbon fork would be, but it sure saves my 47-year-old wrists, elbows and shoulders.

I've tried riding it (on the same trail) with the suspension locked for a week and then unlocked for a week; there weren't any noticeable speed differences (wind makes a much bigger impact than suspension, IMO) but my joints were definitely feeling it.

If I were ever thinking about a non-suspension hybrid, I think I'd just go with a road bike.
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Old 07-22-15, 06:53 AM
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https://www.bikeforums.net/hybrid-bic...s-hybrids.html

An earlier post with lots of pinions..............
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Old 07-22-15, 07:18 AM
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I have a Trek DS 8.3 with a lockout. I don't use the suspension as much as I thought I would, even on gravel roads. However, some months ago I took a new ride that was eight miles all down hill on a paved, major road. I thought it was going to be eight miles of downhill bliss. It turned out the bike lane was full of potholes, rocks, ruts, and washboards. It was the only way to get home and it was hell. The suspension fork was a godsend. As I suspected when I bought the bike -- just never know when it might come in handy.
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