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Official Specialized Crosstrail owners thread

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Official Specialized Crosstrail owners thread

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Old 09-06-15, 11:03 AM
  #101  
Bill1227
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Too many sub-catagory, discussion's starting on this thread that should be asked in PM or new thread so others don't have to sift through it.

Back on track.

My modified 2013.
Large frame 27#'s on bike shop scale with pedals.

Two modes - distance / local

Mod's - carbon fork,grips,adjusted and cut bars,tires (I like 47's/1.8"two sets Specialized Trigger File tread 47mm new for 2015 and Renegade XC low profile knobs 1.8"),pedals,power grip peddle straps ,saddle,flip'ed stem,graphics / stickers removed all but specialized ghost on down tube, Other than that stock - extra's for various modes - rechargeable lights,computer,frame pump,saddle bag,bottle holders, rack, mud guards,3m reflective tape strips to wheels, porcelien rocket custom micro panniers.

Likes - Long wheel base, higher bb, extra tire clearance compared to some (trek ds), anodized frame, trip tour gearing. Best at - Urban,Townie,Forest Service,Gravel, light tour , multi use. Similar To - AWOL, Former Tri Cross, Fargo, Dual Sport,etc.



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Old 09-08-15, 06:12 PM
  #102  
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Originally Posted by Bill1227 View Post
Too many sub-catagory, discussion's starting on this thread that should be asked in PM or new thread so others don't have to sift through it.

Back on track.

My modified 2013.
Large frame 27#'s on bike shop scale with pedals.

Two modes - distance / local

Mod's - carbon fork,grips,adjusted and cut bars,tires (I like 47's/1.8"two sets Specialized Trigger File tread 47mm new for 2015 and Renegade XC low profile knobs 1.8"),pedals,power grip peddle straps ,saddle,flip'ed stem,graphics / stickers removed all but specialized ghost on down tube, Other than that stock - extra's for various modes - rechargeable lights,computer,frame pump,saddle bag,bottle holders, rack, mud guards,3m reflective tape strips to wheels, porcelien rocket custom micro panniers.

Likes - Long wheel base, higher bb, extra tire clearance compared to some (trek ds), anodized frame, trip tour gearing. Best at - Urban,Townie,Forest Service,Gravel, light tour , multi use. Similar To - AWOL, Former Tri Cross, Fargo, Dual Sport,etc.



Nice tourer you got there.
Question, how did you remove the stickers? I want to remove some of mine, but don't want to harm the finish.
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Old 09-08-15, 06:21 PM
  #103  
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What's the difference between the M4 aluminum frame found on the higher end crosstrails as opposed to the A1 frame?
I know that the m4 is comparable to E5 frame found on the Specialized road bikes, but I don't know what that means either.
Seriously, anybody know the difference?
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Old 09-08-15, 08:27 PM
  #104  
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It's quite straightforward. Most frame manufacturers have a series of 'grades' of aluminum -- the grade is determined by the different metals used to create the raw frame material: aluminum 'alloyed' with other metals.

Both Specialized (Merida) and Giant, for example, use 6061 aluminum alloy as a 'base'. Giant's Aluxx = Specialized's A1: pretty light, reasonable tensile strength, and so on. The '6---' designation refers to the alloying of magnesium and silicone to the aluminum. That allows heat treating. Increasing the proportion of magnesium/silicone increases tensile strength, and so allows for less material to be used for equivalent strength -- so, less weight for a frame as strong or stronger than a basic 6061 frame. It also allows for increased amounts of butting/shaping of the tubes, which some claim contributes to ride quality. So A1: strong; reasonably light; very cost effective. M4/M5/E5: stronger, lighter, and more 'manipulated' (shaped/butted), but a little more expensive to produce.

That's about it, really. Some manufacturers use 7--- series aluminum: the alloying agent is zinc. Very, very strong but rather more susceptible to stress/corrosion cracking than are 6--- series alloys.
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Old 09-08-15, 08:52 PM
  #105  
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Originally Posted by badger1 View Post
It's quite straightforward. Most frame manufacturers have a series of 'grades' of aluminum -- the grade is determined by the different metals used to create the raw frame material: aluminum 'alloyed' with other metals.

Both Specialized (Merida) and Giant, for example, use 6061 aluminum alloy as a 'base'. Giant's Aluxx = Specialized's A1: pretty light, reasonable tensile strength, and so on. The '6---' designation refers to the alloying of magnesium and silicone to the aluminum. That allows heat treating. Increasing the proportion of magnesium/silicone increases tensile strength, and so allows for less material to be used for equivalent strength -- so, less weight for a frame as strong or stronger than a basic 6061 frame. It also allows for increased amounts of butting/shaping of the tubes, which some claim contributes to ride quality. So A1: strong; reasonably light; very cost effective. M4/M5/E5: stronger, lighter, and more 'manipulated' (shaped/butted), but a little more expensive to produce.

That's about it, really. Some manufacturers use 7--- series aluminum: the alloying agent is zinc. Very, very strong but rather more susceptible to stress/corrosion cracking than are 6--- series alloys.
Alrighty then!.....Ask and ye shall receive. Excellent information. Thank you kindly sir.
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Old 09-08-15, 11:07 PM
  #106  
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Originally Posted by badger1 View Post
It's quite straightforward. Most frame manufacturers have a series of 'grades' of aluminum -- the grade is determined by the different metals used to create the raw frame material: aluminum 'alloyed' with other metals.

Both Specialized (Merida) and Giant, for example, use 6061 aluminum alloy as a 'base'. Giant's Aluxx = Specialized's A1: pretty light, reasonable tensile strength, and so on. The '6---' designation refers to the alloying of magnesium and silicone to the aluminum. That allows heat treating. Increasing the proportion of magnesium/silicone increases tensile strength, and so allows for less material to be used for equivalent strength -- so, less weight for a frame as strong or stronger than a basic 6061 frame. It also allows for increased amounts of butting/shaping of the tubes, which some claim contributes to ride quality. So A1: strong; reasonably light; very cost effective. M4/M5/E5: stronger, lighter, and more 'manipulated' (shaped/butted), but a little more expensive to produce.

That's about it, really. Some manufacturers use 7--- series aluminum: the alloying agent is zinc. Very, very strong but rather more susceptible to stress/corrosion cracking than are 6--- series alloys.
Great post.
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Old 09-09-15, 09:06 AM
  #107  
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Originally Posted by badger1 View Post
It's quite straightforward. Most frame manufacturers have a series of 'grades' of aluminum -- the grade is determined by the different metals used to create the raw frame material: aluminum 'alloyed' with other metals.

Both Specialized (Merida) and Giant, for example, use 6061 aluminum alloy as a 'base'. Giant's Aluxx = Specialized's A1: pretty light, reasonable tensile strength, and so on. The '6---' designation refers to the alloying of magnesium and silicone to the aluminum. That allows heat treating. Increasing the proportion of magnesium/silicone increases tensile strength, and so allows for less material to be used for equivalent strength -- so, less weight for a frame as strong or stronger than a basic 6061 frame. It also allows for increased amounts of butting/shaping of the tubes, which some claim contributes to ride quality. So A1: strong; reasonably light; very cost effective. M4/M5/E5: stronger, lighter, and more 'manipulated' (shaped/butted), but a little more expensive to produce.

That's about it, really. Some manufacturers use 7--- series aluminum: the alloying agent is zinc. Very, very strong but rather more susceptible to stress/corrosion cracking than are 6--- series alloys.
Thanks! That was great information.
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Old 09-10-15, 10:31 PM
  #108  
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@ avidone1

Question, how did you remove the stickers? I want to remove some of mine, but don't want to harm the finish.

Answer - Acetone / Nail Polish Remover
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Old 09-11-15, 01:37 PM
  #109  
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I have the specialized crosstrail elite and i love it. Althought I should have spend the extra $250 for the Comp version because of the upgrades in frame and forks. However, was wondering what was the weight of the Comp version.

I use it for commuting since in my area, pike paths are some what rare and I have to hop curbs. Its a great bike.
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Old 09-11-15, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Mattyb13 View Post
Would love some advice from the Crosstrail minded members of this forum. I went for a 25 mile ride today, I ran something over and BAM... both triggers flat! SO, with that said I need to invest in tires. I like the trigger. I am not against getting the Triggers again. However... is there another tire I should be considering. I am 90% paved bike paths with my Crosstrail Expert disc. The occasional dirt path or road. I know there are 1000 forums on tires but I wanted to check with the members of this forum first before I put it out there to the masses that read these forums. Thanks.
have the Continential Top Contact II tires. in the 37mm size. They run great, there is a slick portion and a trail portion in. The big issue with them is that they are pricey, but last a very long time. I also have the Mr Tuffy Lite Tire liners. So far so good. The feel pretty bullet proof and I have been running over goat heads in the deserts here in Nevada.
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Old 09-11-15, 02:16 PM
  #111  
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Originally Posted by Bill1227 View Post
@ avidone1

Question, how did you remove the stickers? I want to remove some of mine, but don't want to harm the finish.

Answer - Acetone / Nail Polish Remover
Thanks, they actually came off quite easily with just my fingernail. I thought they would be tougher to get off so that's why I asked, but I just decided to test for myself and Voila! .....piece of cake.
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Old 09-11-15, 02:19 PM
  #112  
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Originally Posted by naveeny1974 View Post
I have the specialized crosstrail elite and i love it. Althought I should have spend the extra $250 for the Comp version because of the upgrades in frame and forks. However, was wondering what was the weight of the Comp version.

I use it for commuting since in my area, pike paths are some what rare and I have to hop curbs. Its a great bike.
Seems like a popular subject for hybrid riders. I too am considering a tire switch, but in my case I don't ride any trails so I'm probably going to go with smooth tires like the Schwalbe marathon supremes. But honestly, I'm in no hurry. It'll happen when it happens.
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Old 09-11-15, 03:54 PM
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Originally Posted by naveeny1974 View Post
However, was wondering what was the weight of the Comp version.
Mine is currently 27 pounds wet per a luggage scale thats pretty accurate. I've seen anywhere from 23 to 29 pounds mentioned on this forum. It seems like the OEM tire tubes are relatively heavy, but otherwise it pushes the lighter side envelope. Personally I think the Comp M4 frame rides a little harsher on the trails than the A1 aluminum framed models, but that could just be me. The weight difference is noticeable and significant when lifting them onto a bike rack, and the lighter weight makes for a more satisfying ride. Feels quite a bit more "nimble".

Last edited by ColdCase; 09-12-15 at 06:02 AM.
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Old 09-11-15, 07:37 PM
  #114  
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Originally Posted by avidone1 View Post
Seems like a popular subject for hybrid riders. I too am considering a tire switch, but in my case I don't ride any trails so I'm probably going to go with smooth tires like the Schwalbe marathon supremes. But honestly, I'm in no hurry. It'll happen when it happens.
Just keep in mind that the "2016" Marathon Supremes look like a significant improvement to the "2015" Marathon Supremes, but the "2016" version may not yet be on sale, as I haven't seen it anywhere online yet.

They have different looking tread patterns, so it will be relatively easy to tell them apart.
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Old 09-11-15, 07:41 PM
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Originally Posted by ColdCase View Post
Personally I think the Comp M4 frame rides a little harsher than the A1 aluminum framed models, but that could just be me.
That is both interesting and disappointing to hear.

It often seems to be the case that people either claim the higher grades of aluminium also bring better ride quality or it never comes up.

Time for a new thread.
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Old 09-11-15, 08:18 PM
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I'm considering making the switch to rigid fork myself, but this is a much cheaper option:

CarbonCycles.CC :: Components :: Products :: MTB Carbon UD with 1.1/8 inch Steerer :: eXotic UD Carbon Rigid MTB Fork - Disc Only Post Mount :: CC-F0M25

I haven't seen one in person yet, but they get some pretty good reviews online. $175 is a much better option IMO>
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Old 09-11-15, 08:21 PM
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Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
Just keep in mind that the "2016" Marathon Supremes look like a significant improvement to the "2015" Marathon Supremes, but the "2016" version may not yet be on sale, as I haven't seen it anywhere online yet.

They have different looking tread patterns, so it will be relatively easy to tell them apart.
Yes, I 've noticed the same thing. Amazon still has the older version. Like I said though, I"m in no hurry. Oh, and I rode the A1 framed crosstrail several times and there is no doubt in my mind that the M4 is not only lighter but offers a superior ride.
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Old 09-12-15, 12:56 AM
  #118  
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Originally Posted by Natej128 View Post
I'm considering making the switch to rigid fork myself, but this is a much cheaper option:

CarbonCycles.CC :: Components :: Products :: MTB Carbon UD with 1.1/8 inch Steerer :: eXotic UD Carbon Rigid MTB Fork - Disc Only Post Mount :: CC-F0M25

I haven't seen one in person yet, but they get some pretty good reviews online. $175 is a much better option IMO>
But this small print is not encouraging --> Recommended rider weight limit: 97.5kg (215lbs)
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Old 09-12-15, 06:12 AM
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Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
But this small print is not encouraging --> Recommended rider weight limit: 97.5kg (215lbs)

To be fair, I never concern myself with weight limits of anything. I'm only 135lbs.
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Old 09-12-15, 06:50 AM
  #120  
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Originally Posted by Natej128 View Post
To be fair, I never concern myself with weight limits of anything. I'm only 135lbs.
I have these forks on my crosstrail, they are a nice bit of kit. The weight difference compared to stock pogo forks is huge & will transform a bike into a more agile, responsive machine.
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Old 09-12-15, 06:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Ajh800 View Post
I have these forks on my crosstrail, they are a nice bit of kit. The weight difference compared to stock pogo forks is huge & will transform a bike into a more agile, responsive machine.
Did you keep the standard wheelset or did you upgrade to a lighter set as well? I'm trying to figure out if its the tires and tubes or the wheels themselves that make them so damn heavy.
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Old 09-12-15, 07:11 AM
  #122  
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Originally Posted by Natej128 View Post
Did you keep the standard wheelset or did you upgrade to a lighter set as well? I'm trying to figure out if its the tires and tubes or the wheels themselves that make them so damn heavy.
The wheels that came with the bike only lasted 50 miles, bearings were rough. Exchanged them under warranty for some Shimano MT55's plus 50.





The wheels are better all round, stronger & lighter. Tyres are cyclocross or commuter depending on what I'm doing at the time, or season.
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Old 09-16-15, 05:58 AM
  #123  
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Originally Posted by Ajh800 View Post
The wheels that came with the bike only lasted 50 miles, bearings were rough. Exchanged them under warranty for some Shimano MT55's plus 50.





The wheels are better all round, stronger & lighter. Tyres are cyclocross or commuter depending on what I'm doing at the time, or season.
I'd love to see photo's of the whole bike. Me thinks this is way cool looking.
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Old 09-16-15, 01:15 PM
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Originally Posted by avidone1 View Post
I'd love to see photo's of the whole bike. Me thinks this is way cool looking.
The snow helps.

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Old 09-16-15, 03:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Ajh800 View Post
The snow helps.

What is the biggest tyre that will fit your bike at the rear?
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