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2016 Giant ToughRoad SLR2

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2016 Giant ToughRoad SLR2

Old 02-15-17, 05:11 AM
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my tyres arrived - I replaced the inner tubes with Continental 28 Slim and saved 50 grams per tube over the original Giant inner tubes - that's 100 grams ! just on inner tubes.

I then installed 700x35 Continental cyclocross speed and man, these tyres are fast !

Got to get used to the 2 finger braking handle. And also the Q factor is quite large - being a three ring crank. But i really love the range of gears the SLR2 provides - you can pretty much nearly ride up anything.
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Old 02-21-17, 08:39 AM
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Anyone know the widest tire that can be put on this bike front and back?

2.5? 3.0?
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Old 02-21-17, 07:13 PM
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Originally Posted by prj71
Anyone know the widest tire that can be put on this bike front and back?

2.5? 3.0?

2.5 will definitely fit, not sure about 3.0 though.
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Old 02-21-17, 07:58 PM
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Originally Posted by prj71
Anyone know the widest tire that can be put on this bike front and back?

2.5? 3.0?
Originally Posted by gsa103
There's a huge amount of clearance. The fork has 2.90in of clearance at the tire, and similar vertically. Amazingly, the rear actually had more horizontally, maybe slightly less vertically.

You should be able to fit any 2.35in tires and possibly still have room for fenders.
Based on my measurements, there's no way a 3.0 fits. A 2.5 should fit unless you want fenders or it has crazy knobs.
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Old 03-11-17, 12:36 AM
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I test rode the SLR 2 today and liked it. The things i didn't like and I hope you can advise me are:
- Shimano shifters don't work when hitting the brake since one needs the index finger to shift to smaller sprocket. Google tells me this is a Shimano problem for all their shifters (My current bike has SRAM)
- it has a non-car air valve. i really don't want to have some adapter to get air from a compressor. I doubt they saved any money. I could buy a new tube with a Schrader valve and drill a larger hole, but don't want to buy an expensive new bike and buy new things for it.
- I couldn't find good information on the M315 brakes except they cost $16 (the SLR 1 brakes cost over $100). Not a good sign. I never had hydraulic brakes before, so my little testride didn't tell me much except they didn't work worse than the rim brakes on the Escape 1.

I haven't ridden it yet, but also like the SLR 1. Has much better hardware (and SRAM shifters!). Drawback is the price and that the front sprocket only has 42 teeth (44 for the SLR 1). On my SLR 2 test ride i was able to get into 27th (fastest) gear quickly, so I wouldn't want less. It also seems there are no cranks for 10-speed with more teeth (as an option in case it annoys me later).

I also rode the Escape 1 today, but that is heavier and the skinny tires don't ride well and likley damage the rim on bad streets. I don't go off-road beyond some unpaved trails, so the toughroad is a good bike in general.
Any advice or alleviation of my concerns is appreciated.
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Old 03-11-17, 04:16 AM
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Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun
I test rode the SLR 2 today and liked it. The things i didn't like and I hope you can advise me are:
- Shimano shifters don't work when hitting the brake since one needs the index finger to shift to smaller sprocket. Google tells me this is a Shimano problem for all their shifters (My current bike has SRAM)
- it has a non-car air valve. i really don't want to have some adapter to get air from a compressor. I doubt they saved any money. I could buy a new tube with a Schrader valve and drill a larger hole, but don't want to buy an expensive new bike and buy new things for it.
- I couldn't find good information on the M315 brakes except they cost $16 (the SLR 1 brakes cost over $100). Not a good sign. I never had hydraulic brakes before, so my little testride didn't tell me much except they didn't work worse than the rim brakes on the Escape 1.

I haven't ridden it yet, but also like the SLR 1. Has much better hardware (and SRAM shifters!). Drawback is the price and that the front sprocket only has 42 teeth (44 for the SLR 1). On my SLR 2 test ride i was able to get into 27th (fastest) gear quickly, so I wouldn't want less. It also seems there are no cranks for 10-speed with more teeth (as an option in case it annoys me later).

I also rode the Escape 1 today, but that is heavier and the skinny tires don't ride well and likley damage the rim on bad streets. I don't go off-road beyond some unpaved trails, so the toughroad is a good bike in general.
Any advice or alleviation of my concerns is appreciated.
I bought my Toughroad SLR 2 with the view to upgrading various components over time at my choosing.

So if I have to throw away the cheap brakes so that I can put on brakes I am happy with, so be it.

I have already replaced my crank for a Hollowtech II crank with External Bearing BB.

Next on the agenda is new brakes and larger rotors.

I just haven't had any problems or issues with Presta valves, if you want to be able to go to a garage to pump up your tyres, keep a converter in your saddlebag.
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Old 03-12-17, 02:59 PM
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ColonelSanders: thanks, that is valid advice. I'm still to have to test the SLR 1, but I think I will like the 2x10 (and SRAM shifters) better. But considering the cost of replacing all what would be needed (basically full drive train and the shifters) I could as well just buy the SLR 1 and be financially better off. I'm right now (and probably few more days) reading all the Sheldon Brown articles to educate myself better. Really great stuff I didn't know despite biking all my life...

I was mentally prepared to look into just buying a good frame and build it myself and pick right away what want. but it seems it is hard to find frames (with enough information etc.). for example i like the SLR 1/2 have the holes to route the hydraulic and cables in the frame. but this may be more to bit then i can chew and may not be economical. Despite my concerns i think Giant did a good job fitting the SLR 1/2.

some more SLR 2 questions:
- did anyone cross-shop it with the SLR 1? and if so what is the conclusion / opinion and why did you chose the one over the other?
- can the wheels (rims) be fitted with tube-less tires? I would consider doing that once the original set wears out. I'm surprised it isn't common yet in a weight- and puncture conscious industry like the bike industry.
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Old 03-12-17, 05:31 PM
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Hi, I was about to make a new thread but I guess it would be better to ask this here. I am about to buy a new bike which I would be using on country roads and cycle trails (gravel, chippings). I thought that a mountain bike wouldn't be needed as I won't ever be doing real mountain biking and the trails I am going on are mostly in good condition. I was advised these bikes in my price range:

  • Giant Toughroad SLR 2 (Told this was the best choice)
  • Cube travel
  • Cube sl road
  • Lapierre cross 300
  • Cannondale Quick CX 4 city.

I am thinking of getting the Giant Toughroad SLR2 and would just like people in the know to confirm for me that it would be the best choice? I don't want to have to buy another bike for at least five years or longer so will it be a good longterm choice? Also, would it be okay for going up hills on country roads? Would I need to buy an extra set of tyres to cover both the roads and off-road trails or will the tyres supplied be okay for both?

Thanks
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Old 03-12-17, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by ber3000
Hi, I was about to make a new thread but I guess it would be better to ask this here. I am about to buy a new bike which I would be using on country roads and cycle trails (gravel, chippings). I thought that a mountain bike wouldn't be needed as I won't ever be doing real mountain biking and the trails I am going on are mostly in good condition. I was advised these bikes in my price range:

  • Giant Toughroad SLR 2 (Told this was the best choice)
  • Cube travel
  • Cube sl road
  • Lapierre cross 300
  • Cannondale Quick CX 4 city.

I am thinking of getting the Giant Toughroad SLR2 and would just like people in the know to confirm for me that it would be the best choice? I don't want to have to buy another bike for at least five years or longer so will it be a good longterm choice? Also, would it be okay for going up hills on country roads? Would I need to buy an extra set of tyres to cover both the roads and off-road trails or will the tyres supplied be okay for both?

Thanks
The Giant Toughroad SLR 2 is definitely the best choice on that list but really they are all good. It will certainly last you 5 years. I suggest you ride the tires it comes with until either they wear out or you cant stand them. You will know by then the kind of tire you want but the stock tires should be fine for mixed use.
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Old 03-12-17, 07:28 PM
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Originally Posted by ber3000
Hi, I was about to make a new thread but I guess it would be better to ask this here. I am about to buy a new bike which I would be using on country roads and cycle trails (gravel, chippings). I thought that a mountain bike wouldn't be needed as I won't ever be doing real mountain biking and the trails I am going on are mostly in good condition. I was advised these bikes in my price range:

  • Giant Toughroad SLR 2 (Told this was the best choice)
  • Cube travel
  • Cube sl road
  • Lapierre cross 300
  • Cannondale Quick CX 4 city.

I am thinking of getting the Giant Toughroad SLR2 and would just like people in the know to confirm for me that it would be the best choice? I don't want to have to buy another bike for at least five years or longer so will it be a good longterm choice? Also, would it be okay for going up hills on country roads? Would I need to buy an extra set of tyres to cover both the roads and off-road trails or will the tyres supplied be okay for both?

Thanks
Toughroad is a decent bike and it will do the job. But I'd highly recommend getting a bike with front suspension for your use. You'll be ok without it, but it's nice to have the option if you do encounter a slightly rougher terrain.
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Old 03-12-17, 07:53 PM
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Urban MTBs are a new category. Rigid MTBs designed around a neutral geometry that can handle urban potholed streets and decent off-road trails with equal aplomb.

Why buy two bikes when you can do it with one? That's the Giant TR SLR and Marin Muirwoods. They're designed for casual riders seeking to do more with their bike.
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Old 03-12-17, 08:00 PM
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Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun
ColonelSanders: thanks, that is valid advice. I'm still to have to test the SLR 1, but I think I will like the 2x10 (and SRAM shifters) better. But considering the cost of replacing all what would be needed (basically full drive train and the shifters) I could as well just buy the SLR 1 and be financially better off. I'm right now (and probably few more days) reading all the Sheldon Brown articles to educate myself better. Really great stuff I didn't know despite biking all my life...

I was mentally prepared to look into just buying a good frame and build it myself and pick right away what want. but it seems it is hard to find frames (with enough information etc.). for example i like the SLR 1/2 have the holes to route the hydraulic and cables in the frame. but this may be more to bit then i can chew and may not be economical. Despite my concerns i think Giant did a good job fitting the SLR 1/2.
The SLR 1 & 2 don't have any cables routed through the frame, it looks that way and the bike has a very clean look about it, but that is because they run all the cables on the underside of the downtube and have a plastic guard which serves as a bit of a frame protector and spray protector for you, cover up all the cables.

some more SLR 2 questions:
- did anyone cross-shop it with the SLR 1? and if so what is the conclusion / opinion and why did you chose the one over the other?
My reasons for choosing the SLR 2 may not be the normal sort of reasons that one does so, as there is nothing wrong with the SLR 1, it is a great bike too.

But for me, I tend to be very specific in what I want, so even though I want front and rear racks, the ones on the Giant weren't exactly what I wanted, so I didn't see that as a plus on the SLR 1, but many other folks wouldn't care and be happy with those racks.

The single biggest reason is that I want gear indicators on my shifters and the Sram shifters on the SLR 1 didn't have that.

Now the SLR 2 does have gear indicators, so I like that, but as I plan to update my shifters to XT eventually, again I don't feel bad about junking the cheaper shifters on the SLR 2, as I would, compared to junking the more expensive ones on the SLR 1.

Also, I wanted a crankset that had a trouser guard, so that meant I would need to replace whatever crankset was on either the SLR 1 or 2, but again as the SLR 2's crankset was a much cheaper version, I won't lose any sleep over junking it either.

Then you can throw in that I was curious to see how well Acera and Alivio components work these days, compared to 20 years ago, when I had them on my old 1996 Trek 830.

There was also the opportunity to mess around a bit with a triple crank, to see if it might suit me better than a double crank, before I made the decision to upgrade my crankset.

Now it wouldn't surprise me if my reasons for going with the SLR 2 don't resonate with you and you think the SLR 1 is the better buy. That is a perfectly reasonable point of view.

- can the wheels (rims) be fitted with tube-less tires? I would consider doing that once the original set wears out. I'm surprised it isn't common yet in a weight- and puncture conscious industry like the bike industry.
My understanding is that any modern, decent wheelset these days can go tubeless without any drama, so I suspect the wheels that come on the Toughroad would be able to handle a tubeless set up.
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Old 03-12-17, 08:23 PM
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Originally Posted by ColonelSanders
The SLR 1 & 2 don't have any cables routed through the frame, it looks that way and the bike has a very clean look about it, but that is because they run all the cables on the underside of the downtube and have a plastic guard which serves as a bit of a frame protector and spray protector for you, cover up all the cables.
sorry, I mixed that up witht eh "Escape 1", which has the cables routed through the frame, which I liked.
Can you tell the the routing inder the frame exposes any cable, or if it is one single cable shield? I would prefer not exposed cable as that can corrode and let water into the cable.

But for me, I tend to be very specific in what I want, so even though I want front and rear racks, the ones on the Giant weren't exactly what I wanted, so I didn't see that as a plus on the SLR 1, but many other folks wouldn't care and be happy with those racks.
to me the racks don't matter at all, won't use them and would just be wasted money and weight.

The single biggest reason is that I want gear indicators on my shifters and the Sram shifters on the SLR 1 didn't have that.

Now the SLR 2 does have gear indicators, so I like that, but as I plan to update my shifters to XT eventually, again I don't feel bad about junking the cheaper shifters on the SLR 2, as I would, compared to junking the more expensive ones on the SLR 1.
i will look for that, no gear indicators really would suck. is yours a 2016? (that woudl giv eme hope the 2017 has indicators...

Also, I wanted a crankset that had a trouser guard, so that meant I would need to replace whatever crankset was on either the SLR 1 or 2, but again as the SLR 2's crankset was a much cheaper version, I won't lose any sleep over junking it either.
i now see they don't have the guards. Yes i'd like guards too, not sure i would buy a new crank for it. Do you recall if the cranks were the 170 or the 175 mm? That model is offered in both sizes, but the specs don't Make that clear.

Then you can throw in that I was curious to see how well Acera and Alivio components work these days, compared to 20 years ago, when I had them on my old 1996 Trek 830.
how well are they? about 20 years ago I hade a bike with Deore, which I liked a lot and held up well. but at the time Acera was only a 7-speed cassette, not is is 9, so much different...

There was also the opportunity to mess around a bit with a triple crank, to see if it might suit me better than a double crank, before I made the decision to upgrade my crankset.
Did you actually go to a double? the 2x10 is new to me, but the more i read about it (and for my riding style) a 2x seems to be better for me. so if you switched I like to hear.
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Old 03-12-17, 09:29 PM
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Originally Posted by jase33
The Giant Toughroad SLR 2 is definitely the best choice on that list but really they are all good. It will certainly last you 5 years. I suggest you ride the tires it comes with until either they wear out or you cant stand them. You will know by then the kind of tire you want but the stock tires should be fine for mixed use.
Thanks

Originally Posted by Haffster
Toughroad is a decent bike and it will do the job. But I'd highly recommend getting a bike with front suspension for your use. You'll be ok without it, but it's nice to have the option if you do encounter a slightly rougher terrain.
Would you have any suggestions in the same price range? I can safely say that I will only be going on country roads and the same cycle trail. I guess I could encounter some mud/potholes. I had thought I was going to get a mountain bike but it would be a bit too cumbersome for going at speed on regular trails
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Old 03-13-17, 04:06 AM
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Originally Posted by ber3000
Thanks



Would you have any suggestions in the same price range? I can safely say that I will only be going on country roads and the same cycle trail. I guess I could encounter some mud/potholes. I had thought I was going to get a mountain bike but it would be a bit too cumbersome for going at speed on regular trails
Check out Giant Roam 0. It's cheaper than the Toughroad, better components (Deore/SLX), better brakes and a pretty decent fork with a lockout.
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Old 03-13-17, 05:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Haffster
Toughroad is a decent bike and it will do the job. But I'd highly recommend getting a bike with front suspension for your use. You'll be ok without it, but it's nice to have the option if you do encounter a slightly rougher terrain.
This seems to need repeating over and over...

The suspension on these bikes in the ~$1000 range is junk. It's just dead weight doing a whole lot of nothing for the rider.

For the posters desired use, suspension isn't necessary.
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Old 03-13-17, 06:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Haffster
Check out Giant Roam 0. It's cheaper than the Toughroad, better components (Deore/SLX), better brakes and a pretty decent fork with a lockout.
And then you want to change the fork for a rigid. https://www.bikeforums.net/hybrid-bic...-roam-0-a.html
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Old 03-13-17, 06:56 AM
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Originally Posted by prj71
This seems to need repeating over and over...

The suspension on these bikes in the ~$1000 range is junk. It's just dead weight doing a whole lot of nothing for the rider.

For the posters desired use, suspension isn't necessary.
That's generally true but I'm afraid it's not entirely correct. That suntour fork isn't junk - it's clearly not designed to handle technical terrain, but does take some of the harshness off a trail that's not always smooth. It's only 63mm travel, so going over the odd root and bumps is a little smoother. I've got a Toughroad and my friend has the Roam, I can tell you from experience that his is a lot smoother ride.
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Old 03-13-17, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Haffster
That's generally true but I'm afraid it's not entirely correct. That suntour fork isn't junk - it's clearly not designed to handle technical terrain, but does take some of the harshness off a trail that's not always smooth. It's only 63mm travel, so going over the odd root and bumps is a little smoother. I've got a Toughroad and my friend has the Roam, I can tell you from experience that his is a lot smoother ride.
I can't post a URL, but in this YouTube video (Qkm1HS2p1k8), at 1:20 you can see the exact trail that I will be cycling on. I'd just like to add, this is basically the extent of how the bike will be tested.
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Old 03-13-17, 09:40 AM
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Originally Posted by ber3000
I can't post a URL, but in this YouTube video (Qkm1HS2p1k8), at 1:20 you can see the exact trail that I will be cycling on. I'd just like to add, this is basically the extent of how the bike will be tested.
You'd be perfectly fine with a rigid fork on this one.
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Old 03-13-17, 09:27 PM
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Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun
sorry, I mixed that up witht eh "Escape 1", which has the cables routed through the frame, which I liked.
Can you tell the the routing inder the frame exposes any cable, or if it is one single cable shield? I would prefer not exposed cable as that can corrode and let water into the cable.
No wire is exposed, their is the black plastic covering over the wires.

i will look for that, no gear indicators really would suck. is yours a 2016? (that woudl giv eme hope the 2017 has indicators...
My SLR 2 is a 2016 model.

Do you recall if the cranks were the 170 or the 175 mm? That model is offered in both sizes, but the specs don't Make that clear.
I suspect that 170 or 175 would depend on the frame size you choose.

As I chose a Large, I got a 175mm crank with the bike. But when I put on new cranks, I chose 170mm cranks and I think I am happier for it.

how well are they? about 20 years ago I hade a bike with Deore, which I liked a lot and held up well. but at the time Acera was only a 7-speed cassette, not is is 9, so much different...
I am very happy with the Acera front derailleur on the SLR 2, and the Alivio rear derailleur is pretty good, but is occasionally a bit clunky when changing gears, but nothing too dramatic.

Did you actually go to a double? the 2x10 is new to me, but the more i read about it (and for my riding style) a 2x seems to be better for me. so if you switched I like to hear.
I changed to a 3 x 9 that has the same teeth as the one on my bike, so a 44-32-22, but I pretty much use my crank as though it is a double, as I pretty much never go to the smaller chainring up front.
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Old 04-01-17, 10:50 PM
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Got a new digital bathroom scales and was able to weigh my Toughroad SLR2 - it's 11.4kg. This is with Continental Cyclocross 35c tyres, Continental Race 28 inner tubes, Adamo ISM Attack saddle and Shimano 747 clipless pedals.

The Toughroad has got quite a stretched out geometry - the top tube feels longer than the usual medium - the medium looked like a large with me on it. I exchanged bike with another rider riding a Giant XTC - medium and for awhile i thought he had a 'small' frame in comparison. But i am comfortable on it - actually kind of like the stretched out feeling. I'm 5' 8.5'' and ride a medium in all my bikes.

Last edited by Machoman121; 04-01-17 at 10:57 PM. Reason: addition
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Old 04-10-17, 02:54 PM
  #298  
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I recently removed the downtube plastic armor while swapping the brakes.

There's bolts on the underside of the downtube for a bottle cage, should anyone be inclined.
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Old 04-13-17, 09:35 PM
  #299  
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I just bought a Toughroad SLR 1. Now tubes for on the road and the problem of converting to Schrader valve came up again. Did anyone drill a larger hole in the rim? I noticed the rim is relatively narrow and it looks like the 50 mm tires are almost as thick as it is possible for those rims.
my concern with a Schrader valve would be the structural properties of the rim.

i guess I'm almost answering the question on why road bikes etc. often have PResta valves. But wonder if someone uses Schrader on the Toughroad or if you have an opinion of possible problems.

Edit: I found the tubes are relatively rare. I found these for $12 (Schraderversion only $10). Not that I expect lot of tube use. From what I saw CRC and other stores don't even carry that large 700c tubes.

Edit again: anyone used these "self-sealing" tubes?

Last edited by HerrKaLeun; 04-13-17 at 09:50 PM.
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Old 04-14-17, 06:22 AM
  #300  
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Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun
I just bought a Toughroad SLR 1. Now tubes for on the road and the problem of converting to Schrader valve came up again. Did anyone drill a larger hole in the rim? I noticed the rim is relatively narrow and it looks like the 50 mm tires are almost as thick as it is possible for those rims.
my concern with a Schrader valve would be the structural properties of the rim.

i guess I'm almost answering the question on why road bikes etc. often have PResta valves. But wonder if someone uses Schrader on the Toughroad or if you have an opinion of possible problems.

Edit: I found the tubes are relatively rare. I found these for $12 (Schraderversion only $10). Not that I expect lot of tube use. From what I saw CRC and other stores don't even carry that large 700c tubes.

Edit again: anyone used these "self-sealing" tubes?
Congrats on your bike purchase.

Why not just stick with the Presta valves?

The Presta valves on my Toughroad means that for the first time in my life I have had a bike with Presta valves, but it has been no big deal.
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