Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Hybrid Bicycles
Reload this Page >

2016 Giant ToughRoad SLR2

Hybrid Bicycles Where else would you go to discuss these fun, versatile bikes?

2016 Giant ToughRoad SLR2

Reply

Old 03-11-16, 09:24 PM
  #76  
acdc2704
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
What are your overall impressions, how fast does it seem to you?
I took it out for a 15 mile ride when I got home, didn't hit the trial but around the streets and a backroad where I live. I was able to avg 12.6 mph w stop signs lights, stop signs etc.. Hope to get out on the trial tomorrow but for the size tires really ran smooth. Shifts really nice, is fun to ride love the geometry. I could see me at some point changing the seat didn't love it.
acdc2704 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-16, 09:25 PM
  #77  
acdc2704
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Originally Posted by FrozenBiker View Post
If you're using a Windows PC, open the pic with Paint, then use the "rotate" drop-down box.
Is that a Giant rack?
Yes, it's a Giant rack. Lbs threw it on for me.
acdc2704 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-16, 11:43 AM
  #78  
Bill1227
Senior Member
 
Bill1227's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 113
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
What is the weight of a medium size ? 25 pounds?

Yep, I agree that is The Bike Specialized should have built the Crosstrail into (rather than the cheap,junk $60 pogo,urban suspension fork and limited tire clearance)
Pretty much what I had been turning my Crosstrail into

Well done Giant ! The right gears,tires,carbon fork,post,nice frame,riser bars,etc........great racks for "when if or ever".

just blew Specialized CT's and Trek DS's away !

I want one
Bill1227 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-16, 02:18 PM
  #79  
FrozenBiker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 153
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Bill1227 View Post
I want one
I don't know the actual weight, but it didn't feel sluggish at all. And it is a very comfortable bike to ride.
FrozenBiker is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-16, 07:46 AM
  #80  
Bill1227
Senior Member
 
Bill1227's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 113
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
* I would greatly appreciate posting actual weights of the Giant ToughRoad along with frame size and what is included in the weight example - with peddles, with bottle cages etc.

* Back in this thread someone else asked and one reply said " I think mine is 28 pounds". If so, that seems quite portly to me for a rigid carbon fork 29'er and yet it may well be the case , as it appears by the available racks front and rear versions, it is built for fully loaded touring (front , rear panniers +++). So the wheels, frame etc. may be quite stout.

* By weight comparison similar here is my Size Large Frame 2013 Specialized Crosstrail which I have modified to my liking very similar to what Giant has done with the ToughRoad but, perhaps a little upscale with my aftermarket extras that saved some weight.
Mine is 25#'s on a bike shop scale with peddles, size large frame and wearing a triple crankset. Changes I made include - fork to Carbon origin 8, peddles,wheels to Boyd Altimount, saddle,peddles, tires to Specialized Renegade 1.8" (46mm),cut 1/2" off each end of the riser bars,flipped stem, larger Spesh body geometry grips, Spesh Ned's bar ends.

* PS - I love the multi use concept of this type Bicycle. Basically a rigid touring 29er MTB. I feel they are THE Most Versatile , enjoyable bikes and that Specialized,Trek and many others Really Blew it by allowing the cheap $65 , Super Heavy, Spring , Low Travel, SA Suspension Fork and skinny 38 tires on these type bikes to save a buck (these cheap forks actually cost less than a decent rigid ). The suspension fork company most have a hell of a sales rep

My modified Spesh Crosstrail - size large 25#'s with peddles


kudos to Giant,Kona and others for getting it right......
Bill1227 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-16, 02:41 PM
  #81  
gsa103
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 4,166

Bikes: Bianchi Infinito (Celeste, of course)

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 627 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Bill1227 View Post
* I would greatly appreciate posting actual weights of the Giant ToughRoad along with frame size and what is included in the weight example - with peddles, with bottle cages etc.

* Back in this thread someone else asked and one reply said " I think mine is 28 pounds". If so, that seems quite portly to me for a rigid carbon fork 29'er and yet it may well be the case , as it appears by the available racks front and rear versions, it is built for fully loaded touring (front , rear panniers +++). So the wheels, frame etc. may be quite stout.
I'll have to weigh mine at some point, but 28 lbs has got to be the weight with racks, etc. I've got the SLR 2, which doesn't have that, it feels more like lower ~23 lbs. You could certainly get lighter, but that's mainly component choices.

I've had mine a while now. No regrets on it. I'm still debating if I want to upgrade the brakes to get the one-finger lever shape, but the brakes are still flawless. Overall, I lose ~3 mph commuting compared with my road bike, but that's not too surprising, considering that the comparison is a ~16lb carbon bike with 23mm race tires. The nice part is that I can just bomb off curbs and through dirt, instead of picking lines carefully on the road bike.
gsa103 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-16, 07:18 PM
  #82  
ColonelSanders
Senior Member
 
ColonelSanders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 3,734

Bikes: 2017 Merida Big Nine XT Edition, 2016 Giant Toughroad SLR 2, 1995 Trek 830

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1144 Post(s)
Originally Posted by gsa103 View Post
I'll have to weigh mine at some point, but 28 lbs has got to be the weight with racks, etc. I've got the SLR 2, which doesn't have that, it feels more like lower ~23 lbs. You could certainly get lighter, but that's mainly component choices.

I've had mine a while now. No regrets on it. I'm still debating if I want to upgrade the brakes to get the one-finger lever shape, but the brakes are still flawless. Overall, I lose ~3 mph commuting compared with my road bike, but that's not too surprising, considering that the comparison is a ~16lb carbon bike with 23mm race tires. The nice part is that I can just bomb off curbs and through dirt, instead of picking lines carefully on the road bike.
If you replaced the stock tyres on the Toughroad with Schwalbe Marathon Supreme 40mm tyres, that 3 mph would likely shrink by at least 1 mph.
ColonelSanders is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-16, 07:16 AM
  #83  
Bill1227
Senior Member
 
Bill1227's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 113
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Originally Posted by gsa103 View Post
I'll have to weigh mine at some point, but 28 lbs has got to be the weight with racks, etc. I've got the SLR 2, which doesn't have that, it feels more like lower ~23 lbs. You could certainly get lighter, but that's mainly component choices.

I've had mine a while now. No regrets on it. I'm still debating if I want to upgrade the brakes to get the one-finger lever shape, but the brakes are still flawless. Overall, I lose ~3 mph commuting compared with my road bike, but that's not too surprising, considering that the comparison is a ~16lb carbon bike with 23mm race tires. The nice part is that I can just bomb off curbs and through dirt, instead of picking lines carefully on the road bike.
Thanks but, you really have to put it on a bike shop scale or Park Tool equivalent for decent accuracy. hopefully someone will. Personally as it is built as/for a fully loaded touring bike, the more I think about it the more I doubt the 28 #'s (if actual) would include the racks. Even with carbon fork the wheels, entire bike is built for a full load = front and rear pannier racks.
Example : my Crosstrail above with a aftermarket Origin 8 Carbon Fork, very light 495G Renegade tires, after market Boyd hand built wheels, etc. is 25 #'s with pedals in a size large frame and a Crosstrail is not built for fully loaded touring. Rather light touring. I would be Really,surprised if the Tough Road was "23 pounds".............I bet its 28 pounds with out any racks or anything else but peddles.
Bill1227 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-16, 07:11 PM
  #84  
ColonelSanders
Senior Member
 
ColonelSanders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 3,734

Bikes: 2017 Merida Big Nine XT Edition, 2016 Giant Toughroad SLR 2, 1995 Trek 830

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1144 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Bill1227 View Post
Thanks but, you really have to put it on a bike shop scale or Park Tool equivalent for decent accuracy. hopefully someone will. Personally as it is built as/for a fully loaded touring bike, the more I think about it the more I doubt the 28 #'s (if actual) would include the racks. Even with carbon fork the wheels, entire bike is built for a full load = front and rear pannier racks.
Example : my Crosstrail above with a aftermarket Origin 8 Carbon Fork, very light 495G Renegade tires, after market Boyd hand built wheels, etc. is 25 #'s with pedals in a size large frame and a Crosstrail is not built for fully loaded touring. Rather light touring. I would be Really,surprised if the Tough Road was "23 pounds".............I bet its 28 pounds with out any racks or anything else but peddles.
Someone on these forums weighed a stock Toughroad SLR 2 with a Digital Bike Scale and it came out to being 25.5lbs for a Large size(if my memory serves me correctly).
ColonelSanders is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-16, 07:29 PM
  #85  
badger1
Senior Member
 
badger1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Southwestern Ontario
Posts: 3,839
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 907 Post(s)
Twenty-five pounds or so for the SLR2, w/o racks or pedals, sounds about right. I haven't weighted the bikes, but I've looked closely at a Medium SLR1, with racks and a Medium SLR2 at my LBS. My guess would be that the SLR1 sits around the 24 pound mark, if that, with racks -- would be a bit less without. My Sirrus is 19.4 pounds w/pedals (LBS Park digital scale); the Toughroad SLR1 with stock tires and racks sits between it and my older, lightened Giant Rainier (26.1 pounds, LBS Park digital scale).

In any event, I doubt that either Toughroad model is close to 28 pounds. For what they are they are lightish bikes; most of that is down to the very light frame (Giant's SLR aluminum) and carbon fork. The stock wheels and tires are boat anchors; easily fixed.
badger1 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-16, 09:00 AM
  #86  
Metieval
Senior Member
 
Metieval's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,718

Bikes: Road bike, Hybrid, Gravel, Drop bar SS, hard tail MTB

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 590 Post(s)
what is up with the Sizing?

My 29er Talon is Medium and 18"



Size Head Angle Seat Angle Top Tube Reach Head Tube Stack Chain Stay Wheel Base Standover Height
M/18 70.5 72.5 23.5 n/a 4.5 n/a 17.6 42.6 29.5

Now the Toughroad
M/19 71.5 73 23.4 41.1 5.9 60.1 17.7 42.4 32.2




I really like what Giant did here. However, used hardtails are dime a dozen. Rigid forks are relatively cheap. I'd rather run a 38-42c tire anyways. If the bike is mostly for the road/gravel, with some offroad use then a flatbar Tiagra 2x10 group makes way more sense.

Maybe it is time to build..... Then there is also a 2015 DB Haanjo flatbar is SORA equipped available and $589 right now. BB5 sucks, however TRP spyre/spyke are the better mech brakes anyways. Along with mech being desirable in a year round commute bike.
So $170 + $589 = $759 Haanjo vs ToughRoad $829 (LBS price)

I don't know anything about DB frames though. I do know Giant frames are efficient. Which good stiff frames are priceless in my opinion.

Love Giant and I love the idea of the Toughroad, I am just not sold on it (yet). It doesn't help that all the LBS couldn't move revolts/anyroads. So I seriously doubt they will order and stock this toughroad. :'( I also loved the Anyroad, and Revolt, yet after riding them I wasn't happy with them. The Idea was great, yet Giant missed the mark in making it efficient. They should have just modified the Defy frame to fit 50c tires and called it a day.

Just rambling..... Someone sell me on a Toughroad. Especially, When I currently have a Trek Crossrip. All of this is because I want flatbar, and a slightly higher BB.
__________________
Dawes SST AL, Cannondale Synapse Alloy 105, Giant Talon 29er, Trek Crossrip Elite,
Metieval is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-16, 06:53 PM
  #87  
FrozenBiker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 153
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Metieval View Post
I seriously doubt they will order and stock this toughroad.
You got that right. The factory store in Boston is the only place to see one in this area.
The local shops consider it a "niche bike", and won't stock it.

Originally Posted by Metieval View Post
Someone sell me on a Toughroad.
That's a tough one. What type of terrain/riding would you want it for?
I've been riding paved bikepaths for years on a Raleigh hibrid, and more recently,
found a new passion for unpaved paths. Some of those have trails into the woods.
This bike should handle it with ease. And it's very comfortable to ride. I test rode a
Trek FX 7.4, 7.3, 7.2, Sirrus Elite, Sirrus Sport, Canondale Quick4, Giant Escape 1,
Trek DS, and Specialized Crosstail. They were all fine in their own way, but the
Toughroad was the only one that called out to me. YRMV
FrozenBiker is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-16, 07:23 PM
  #88  
Metieval
Senior Member
 
Metieval's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,718

Bikes: Road bike, Hybrid, Gravel, Drop bar SS, hard tail MTB

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 590 Post(s)
Originally Posted by FrozenBiker View Post



That's a tough one. What type of terrain/riding would you want it for?
I've been riding paved bikepaths for years on a Raleigh hibrid, and more recently,
found a new passion for unpaved paths. Some of those have trails into the woods.
This bike should handle it with ease. And it's very comfortable to ride. I test rode a
Trek FX 7.4, 7.3, 7.2, Sirrus Elite, Sirrus Sport, Canondale Quick4, Giant Escape 1,
Trek DS, and Specialized Crosstail. They were all fine in their own way, but the
Toughroad was the only one that called out to me. YRMV
Terrain, would be mostly pavement. Most rides would be 15 miles, a break, and 15 miles home. Or 5 miles out, 5 miles back with very small break or hours. Once in a while I might push it to a 25 ish out, break and then 25 ish back. However, If I ride to family farm then I have grass, open fields, trails in the woods. Wider tires for me means cush and rolling resistance, nothing more. Cush makes the rolling resistance worth it, however I ran all sorts of off road on 28c slicks. Pick your lines, shift your weight, and yes some of this was snow covered tree roots also. LOL possible, but tire cush is so awesome in comparison.
After riding a good fork, I won't ever do a cheap fork again, ever! Nor will I do Al. forks, carbon or steel is good.
I have other bikes, so this new bike becomes a I'll get there when I get there bike, often with a small backpack, Flat bars because flat bars in town or with family are much more fun. Town is all relative though, sometimes town is very fun with my drop bar freewheel singlespeed.

What draws me to the Toughroad vs other rigid fitness-hybrid bikes is the ability for wide tires. In general I'd run My 40c Clement MSO's or get the new 36c tubeless MSO's. Oh 28c slicks are better in snow though than the Clement MSO's, trust me!!
The FX isn't happening ever! the geo is awkward for me, It doesn't feel sporty, it doesn't make me smile when I ride it. Specialized won't see my money, call it principle. That leaves Cannondale quick, Fuji absolute, DB Haanjo, Omni strada trail, a handful of other flat bar wider tire bikes.

I suppose the Sales pitch I am looking for on the Toughroad is why I would want it rather than building a Rigid hardtail 29er.

1. It looks awesome! (yes I am materialistic like that lol)
2. ??

cons

1: components on the 2 are terrible, and the 1, is geared for trail use only.
2: sizing is very weird! 32" standover with a 30" book inseam 90% kills the reason for wanting a flatbar fun bike.

I guess that last line was the noose that killed any chance of a sale.

I hope Giant reads this..... Maybe I'll buy another Talon 29er for road use.
__________________
Dawes SST AL, Cannondale Synapse Alloy 105, Giant Talon 29er, Trek Crossrip Elite,
Metieval is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-16, 08:49 AM
  #89  
DorkDisk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 883
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 67 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Metieval View Post
I suppose the Sales pitch I am looking for on the Toughroad is why I would want it rather than building a Rigid hardtail 29er.
This bike will make a great choice for someone looking for a vintage feeling bike without having to find and fix up an old bike, or someone who wants old school geometry with newer technology in geometry, brakes, and material technology. The other advantage is bosses for racks, fenders, etc that MTBs shed decades ago. If you're into building up your own rigs, there isn't much too look at. I do wish manufacturers still sold bare frames

Heres a quick and dirty mockup next to my 95 cannondale showing the similarities and the upward sloping top tube. FYI the dale is sub 21lbs (23.1 stock).





Fully rigid MTBs died out in the mainstream about 1996, its nice to see another one being produced by a large brand regardless of the label they put on it without having to go used, BYO, or "custom." MTB-like hybrids with massive tire clearance were few and far between, the advantage of this one is that it promises to be lighter than most previous "hybrid" offerings, although they don't actually have light builds
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
comp1.jpg (100.5 KB, 851 views)
DorkDisk is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-16, 08:57 AM
  #90  
Metieval
Senior Member
 
Metieval's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,718

Bikes: Road bike, Hybrid, Gravel, Drop bar SS, hard tail MTB

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 590 Post(s)
nice mock up!

that explains the tall standover heights.

based on that mock up, It is probably safe to say that this Toughroad will ride like a rigid MTB, but feel like a Hybrid with its longer head tube.

It is almost temping to find an older Trek 750 Multitrack bike also...
__________________
Dawes SST AL, Cannondale Synapse Alloy 105, Giant Talon 29er, Trek Crossrip Elite,
Metieval is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-16, 09:12 AM
  #91  
DorkDisk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 883
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 67 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Metieval View Post

It is almost temping to find an older Trek 750 Multitrack bike also...
I'm always on the lookout for a cheap one. Many 720s but very few higher end ones for sub 100 in my size
DorkDisk is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-16, 04:27 AM
  #92  
ColonelSanders
Senior Member
 
ColonelSanders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 3,734

Bikes: 2017 Merida Big Nine XT Edition, 2016 Giant Toughroad SLR 2, 1995 Trek 830

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1144 Post(s)
I take it the wheels on the Toughroad are the standard 9mm hollow axle on the front and 10mm hollow axle(with quick release) on the rear?
ColonelSanders is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-16, 09:01 AM
  #93  
prj71
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 1,411
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 779 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Bill1227 View Post
* I would greatly appreciate posting actual weights of the Giant ToughRoad along with frame size and what is included in the weight example - with peddles, with bottle cages etc.

* Back in this thread someone else asked and one reply said " I think mine is 28 pounds". If so, that seems quite portly to me for a rigid carbon fork 29'er and yet it may well be the case , as it appears by the available racks front and rear versions, it is built for fully loaded touring (front , rear panniers +++). So the wheels, frame etc. may be quite stout.

* By weight comparison similar here is my Size Large Frame 2013 Specialized Crosstrail which I have modified to my liking very similar to what Giant has done with the ToughRoad but, perhaps a little upscale with my aftermarket extras that saved some weight.
Mine is 25#'s on a bike shop scale with peddles, size large frame and wearing a triple crankset. Changes I made include - fork to Carbon origin 8, peddles,wheels to Boyd Altimount, saddle,peddles, tires to Specialized Renegade 1.8" (46mm),cut 1/2" off each end of the riser bars,flipped stem, larger Spesh body geometry grips, Spesh Ned's bar ends.

* PS - I love the multi use concept of this type Bicycle. Basically a rigid touring 29er MTB. I feel they are THE Most Versatile , enjoyable bikes and that Specialized,Trek and many others Really Blew it by allowing the cheap $65 , Super Heavy, Spring , Low Travel, SA Suspension Fork and skinny 38 tires on these type bikes to save a buck (these cheap forks actually cost less than a decent rigid ). The suspension fork company most have a hell of a sales rep


kudos to Giant,Kona and others for getting it right......
Specialized already makes that which you speak of. They have been since 2013. Aluminum frame and carbon fork. Sold as single speed but can be converted to geared. 22-23 lbs. It was called Carve when it first came out but has been renamed Crave now.

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/bi...e-sl-29/106470

Last edited by prj71; 04-08-16 at 09:12 AM.
prj71 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-16, 11:57 AM
  #94  
NormanF
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 5,734
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Marin Bicycles has the Marin Muirwoods.

Its basically a rigid 29er built for urban riding. I have one and one can upgrade the stock 700 X 42 to 700 X 52 or 29 X 2.0 for all-round riding.

A great rig!
NormanF is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-16, 05:28 PM
  #95  
acdc2704
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
I love this bike the more I ride it the more I love it. I can averaged 15 mph on the paved rail trail and 13 mph on hard packed trail. I am getting ready to swap out the stock tire with some 700x 38c knobby tires and I added bar ends. If you want something different than your normal gravel grinder check this out.
acdc2704 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-16, 06:05 PM
  #96  
D1andonlyDman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Northern San Diego
Posts: 1,857

Bikes: mid 1980s De Rosa SL, 1985 Tommasini Super Prestige all Campy SR, 1992 Paramount PDG Series 7, 1997 Lemond Zurich, 1998 Trek Y-foil, 2006 Schwinn Super Sport GS, 2006 Specialized Hardrock Sport

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Originally Posted by FrozenBiker View Post
You got that right. The factory store in Boston is the only place to see one in this area.
The local shops consider it a "niche bike", and won't stock it.



That's a tough one. What type of terrain/riding would you want it for?
I've been riding paved bikepaths for years on a Raleigh hibrid, and more recently,
found a new passion for unpaved paths. Some of those have trails into the woods.
This bike should handle it with ease. And it's very comfortable to ride. I test rode a
Trek FX 7.4, 7.3, 7.2, Sirrus Elite, Sirrus Sport, Canondale Quick4, Giant Escape 1,
Trek DS, and Specialized Crosstail. They were all fine in their own way, but the
Toughroad was the only one that called out to me. YRMV
They are all similar. The one that called out to me was a pristine mint condition 2006 Schwinn Super Sport GS, which is very much the same type of bike as those, with the key points being: flat bar and upright riding position, wide range gearing, canti brakes, clearance for wide tires and fenders, and a carbon fork, all in a 23.5 lb (medium size) bike.

Only difference was, that pristine, mint condition used Schwinn set me back $100 on Craigslist yesterday. And if I could have gotten a Specialized Sirrus Sport in similar shape for the same $100, it would have been that one that called out to me. Since it was actually a very pleasant experience renting a Sirrus on Maui last year that even made me aware of the benefits of this type of bike in the first place.
D1andonlyDman is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-16, 07:10 AM
  #97  
prj71
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 1,411
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 779 Post(s)
Originally Posted by acdc2704 View Post
I am getting ready to swap out the stock tire with some 700x 38c knobby tires
So you can use these tires on the stock rim that comes on the bike?

Seriously thinking of ditching my Crosstrail for this bike. If it's just a tire swap, this bike can be used for road and gravel rides.

Last edited by prj71; 05-18-16 at 07:14 AM.
prj71 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-16, 07:28 AM
  #98  
ColonelSanders
Senior Member
 
ColonelSanders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 3,734

Bikes: 2017 Merida Big Nine XT Edition, 2016 Giant Toughroad SLR 2, 1995 Trek 830

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1144 Post(s)
Originally Posted by prj71 View Post
So you can use these tires on the stock rim that comes on the bike?

Seriously thinking of ditching my Crosstrail for this bike. If it's just a tire swap, this bike can be used for road and gravel rides.
The rim is 19mm internally wide on the stock wheel.
ColonelSanders is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-16, 08:35 AM
  #99  
acdc2704
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Yes, standard 700 C tires fit on the rim. I put the 38's rolling resistance has been much better, of course I lost a little comfort.
acdc2704 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-16, 10:52 PM
  #100  
HCB
Senior Member
 
HCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Southern California
Posts: 129
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Any Toughroad owner considering putting on a small travel (50mm) suspension fork on their bikes? I'm really enjoying my bike and have been going off road more than I expected. Rock Shox makes a 50mm travel Paragon suspension fork that has me curious. Its also only $250, or less on sale.
What do you think?
HCB is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service