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My cool Schwinn

Old 04-24-16, 09:23 PM
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goraman
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My cool Schwinn

This bike started out life a very heavy Schwinn Trailway $249.99 from Target.
It was over 40 lbs. Now it is very near 21lbs. and Rocks!
It is now 21 pounds 6 ounces. I can trim about another 3oz. by moving to a XT rear derailleur and replacing the seat bolts with Ti bolts and rear derailleur bolts. But not today. This bike will probably never be lighter than 21 lbs. the frame is just to heavy.
Even now every part including bolts has been replaced with something lighter and only the frame is original.
All of the parts used to make this build where based on 2 criteria, long life and light in weight.
No added fluff,strictly business built.
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Old 04-25-16, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by goraman View Post
This bike started out life a very heavy Schwinn Trailway $249.99 from Target.
It was over 40 lbs. Now it is very near 21lbs. and Rocks!
It is now 21 pounds 6 ounces. I can trim about another 3oz. by moving to a XT rear derailleur and replacing the seat bolts with Ti bolts and rear derailleur bolts. But not today. This bike will probably never be lighter than 21 lbs. the frame is just to heavy.
Even now every part including bolts has been replaced with something lighter and only the frame is original.
All of the parts used to make this build where based on 2 criteria, long life and light in weight.
No added fluff,strictly business built.
Interesting. That cyclocross fork looks a bit short as a replacement for a suspension fork (391mm a-c) which subsequently steepens the head tube and seat tube angles, as well as lowering the BB. The good news is that you can get used to just about anything
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Old 04-25-16, 01:09 PM
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there is 10mm difference and I have plenty of clearance.
If you compare picture #2 and picture #5 (stock) you can get an idea of stock and modified differences.
I also went from 170mm stock crank arms to 175mm.

Last edited by goraman; 04-25-16 at 02:27 PM.
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Old 04-25-16, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by goraman View Post
there is 10mm difference and I have plenty of clearance.
If you compare picture #2 and picture #5 (stock) you can get an idea of stock and modified differences.
I also went from 170mm stock crank arms to 175mm.
Clearance is a tire issue; I'm talking about fork length, which is a geometry issue. There is no way a cheap 50mm travel fork is only 10mm longer than a 'cross race fork, which make it a priority to have a low stack height while maximizing tire clearance where cheap suspension is not concerned about jacking up the height.

50-25% sag = 37.5mm = 1.5inches= 1.5 degrees steeper roughly

Your images clearly show a larger than 1cm difference. Look at the distance between the front wheel and the downtube between stock and yours
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Old 04-25-16, 03:45 PM
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Originally Posted by DorkDisk View Post
Clearance is a tire issue; I'm talking about fork length, which is a geometry issue. There is no way a cheap 50mm travel fork is only 10mm longer than a 'cross race fork, which make it a priority to have a low stack height while maximizing tire clearance where cheap suspension is not concerned about jacking up the height.

50-25% sag = 37.5mm = 1.5inches= 1.5 degrees steeper roughly

Your images clearly show a larger than 1cm difference. Look at the distance between the front wheel and the downtube between stock and yours
You are 100% right, as I had changed the cheap suspension forks for chromo ridged forks and then went to the carbon fiber cycle cross forks so it looks like the chromo forks where shorter too.
I still have nearly 3 1/2 inches from the bottom of the peddle to the ground I just measured allowing me to lean the bike pretty far onto a turn, but there is no question the bike sits lower in the front. ( what is the stack height)?
I do like the total front of the bike lower, I hate the front of the bike sitting up high like most modern choppers.
Old school bikes where cut at the tube and angled back to keep the front down low. New choppers sit higher in the front with less rake at the neck.
An example for 2 more ft. of fork tubes you need a 45 degree rake to keep the bike sitting level.
Ether way the bike rides nice and corners well.


picture 1 I like, picture 2 I hate. The 3ed picture is more my style.
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Old 04-25-16, 05:43 PM
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A lot of money to lighten a Wallyworld Schwinn?

I'd have sold it and bought a lighter bike. Better quality equals satisfaction.
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Old 04-25-16, 06:26 PM
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Originally Posted by NormanF View Post
A lot of money to lighten a Wallyworld Schwinn?

I'd have sold it and bought a lighter bike. Better quality equals satisfaction.
Well , it is all top quality now, and it is unique, that is what hod rodding is all about building your own.
Anyone can walk into a bike shop and pull out a credit card for an off the shelf bike.
I just swapped out the derailleur bolts to Ti.
A hot rod is never truly finished but can be improved on as it's owner sees fit.

Last edited by goraman; 04-25-16 at 06:29 PM.
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Old 04-25-16, 10:31 PM
  #8  
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Originally Posted by goraman View Post
This bike started out life a very heavy Schwinn Trailway $249.99 from Target.
It was over 40 lbs. Now it is very near 21lbs. and Rocks!
It is now 21 pounds 6 ounces. I can trim about another 3oz. by moving to a XT rear derailleur and replacing the seat bolts with Ti bolts and rear derailleur bolts. But not today. This bike will probably never be lighter than 21 lbs. the frame is just to heavy.
Even now every part including bolts has been replaced with something lighter and only the frame is original.
All of the parts used to make this build where based on 2 criteria, long life and light in weight.
No added fluff,strictly business built.
You have made some great changes, but like others, I don't get why you started off with such a crappy bike as your base?

If you were to get a new frame and switch those parts over, you would probably have a much better riding experience again.
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Old 04-25-16, 11:12 PM
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Originally Posted by goraman View Post
Well , it is all top quality now, and it is unique, that is what hod rodding is all about building your own.
Anyone can walk into a bike shop and pull out a credit card for an off the shelf bike.
I just swapped out the derailleur bolts to Ti.
A hot rod is never truly finished but can be improved on as it's owner sees fit.
You're a frame away from a nice bike. I would suggest one designed for a rigid 391mm axle to crown fork so you don't mess with the geometry and so you can use the nice fork you already have.
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Old 04-25-16, 11:12 PM
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Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
You have made some great changes, but like others, I don't get why you started off with such a crappy bike as your base?

If you were to get a new frame and switch those parts over, you would probably have a much better riding experience again.
I put hundreds into an old Raleigh 3 speed sprite enjoyed riding it and only sold it because my wife got a new bike and I took ownership of this Schwinn Trailway it was hers.
I enjoy projects, and this was no different. No it's not a Specialized, Trek or Giant it's a lowly Schwinn but it is fun to ride and there are a lot of Schwinn Trailways in my town as we live very near Target and it is a popular seller. Part of the fun is when other Trailway owners are checking it out or asking where did I get this or that?
It is fun to have something different. And no one can call me a bike snob as long as I'm riding a Target Schwinn!
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Old 04-25-16, 11:41 PM
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Originally Posted by goraman View Post
I put hundreds into an old Raleigh 3 speed sprite enjoyed riding it and only sold it because my wife got a new bike and I took ownership of this Schwinn Trailway it was hers.
I enjoy projects, and this was no different. No it's not a Specialized, Trek or Giant it's a lowly Schwinn but it is fun to ride and there are a lot of Schwinn Trailways in my town as we live very near Target and it is a popular seller. Part of the fun is when other Trailway owners are checking it out or asking where did I get this or that?
It is fun to have something different. And no one can call me a bike snob as long as I'm riding a Target Schwinn!
Okay, but what about ride quality?

I'd be amazed if you couldn't get a frame for less than $500 that makes a noticeable difference in what it feels like when you ride it.

Hell, you would almost certainly drop at least a pound in weight, probably two pounds, maybe even more.
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Old 04-26-16, 12:36 AM
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Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
Okay, but what about ride quality?

I'd be amazed if you couldn't get a frame for less than $500 that makes a noticeable difference in what it feels like when you ride it.

Hell, you would almost certainly drop at least a pound in weight, probably two pounds, maybe even more.
The Trailway frame it's self is a very heavy aluminum frame made for the heaviest rider, its got to be more than 8-9 pounds ( just the bare frame) no forks.
So you are right, it had absolutely no compliance till the carbon forks where added, you could feel every small pebble in the road.
Every part on the bike is very light but the frame it's self.
When you take a stock bike that exceeded 40 lbs. and use the lightest parts only to brake the 22 pound mark, you know the frame is a tank!

It would need to have V brake mounts, a 1 1/8 head tube and be made for 700c wheels. I am open to suggestions.
Seems v brakes have gone out of production. I would even be open to a used frame.
But for now I enjoy riding this odd dog.
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Old 04-26-16, 12:42 AM
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I am always open to suggestions, but I am not sure who makes a frame that would take it's place.
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Old 04-26-16, 12:30 PM
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Lotsa companies make frames with V Brake mounts. Cannondale Quick comes to mind...
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Old 04-26-16, 04:10 PM
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Originally Posted by goraman View Post
I am always open to suggestions, but I am not sure who makes a frame that would take it's place.
I'll offer some more suggestions later, but the first contender that came to mind is the Soma Double Cross.

However they may also include a steel fork which arguably you don't want to pay for, as you have your carbon fork.

However it would be interesting to hear your thoughts on which fork is more comfortable as I have heard a number of people argue that a good steel fork is more comfortable than a carbon fork, but is heavier.
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Old 04-26-16, 05:50 PM
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What a bunch of snobs!
I think what you did to your Schwinn is actually pretty cool. Lots of people build or re-build there bikes. As long as you like it and it suits your needs, what's the problem?
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Old 04-26-16, 07:10 PM
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Originally Posted by cornsnake View Post
What a bunch of snobs!
I think what you did to your Schwinn is actually pretty cool. Lots of people build or re-build there bikes. As long as you like it and it suits your needs, what's the problem?
I think DorkDisk made his "problem" with it pretty clear and it's a legitimate one. I think it's ironic that you would call the other posters "snobs" for stating their issues with the bike, when arguably the only person who could be considered a "snob" here is the OP after all the money he undoubtably spent on those premium components to upgrade that bike, whereas a casual "non-snob" would have just ridden the Schwinn the way it was. I think we could all be called "snobs" here, why else dedicate so much time to a forum about bicycles? "Normal" people just go to the store and buy one without a second thought.
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Old 04-26-16, 09:00 PM
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My reason for upgrading is 2 fold #1 I live up a steep flight of stairs and Im 50 years old. Lugging a 40 lb. bike sucked.
#2 the way it was derailleurs that did't stay in adjustment. The Schwinn Trailway has been changed from it's original run, the newer one is only 34 pounds as they changed forks and wheels. I am a snob if that means liking a smooth crisp shift, being able to stop, and being able to carry it up stairs after a long ride.
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Old 04-26-16, 10:19 PM
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Originally Posted by goraman View Post
My reason for upgrading is 2 fold #1 I live up a steep flight of stairs and Im 50 years old. Lugging a 40 lb. bike sucked.
#2 the way it was derailleurs that did't stay in adjustment. The Schwinn Trailway has been changed from it's original run, the newer one is only 34 pounds as they changed forks and wheels. I am a snob if that means liking a smooth crisp shift, being able to stop, and being able to carry it up stairs after a long ride.
With respect to your criteria, you could have bought a nice hybrid bike and had all of those things (light weight, comfort, crisp shifting) straight off the bat. No one is saying the things you listed arn't desireable.

My point re: the "snob" comment made by cornsnake was that we're all a bit snobby, and that's not such a bad thing. We like bikes, we like riding bikes and talking about bikes, and a lot of us have very strong opinions about those things that we like. Maybe it would be easier if everyone just said "nice bike" and went about their day, but I think some valid points were made about the fork length (and resulting geometry concerns) and isn't that what we're all here to do? Talk about bikes?
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Old 04-27-16, 01:15 AM
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A Trailway was the bike that got me back into cycling, and it didn't take me long to outgrow it. I still have it though and enjoy it even with all it's faults as a BSO / POS beater to ride with my wife and on MUPS. I actually went the other direction and added to its 40+ lbs with a Schwinn rack and Schwinn cha-ching bell. I grew up in a era when the brand was respected. I've worn out the bottom bracket but the Tourney gearing is holding up OK.
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Old 04-27-16, 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Deal4Fuji View Post
A Trailway was the bike that got me back into cycling, and it didn't take me long to outgrow it. I still have it though and enjoy it even with all it's faults as a BSO / POS beater to ride with my wife and on MUPS. I actually went the other direction and added to its 40+ lbs with a Schwinn rack and Schwinn cha-ching bell. I grew up in a era when the brand was respected. I've worn out the bottom bracket but the Tourney gearing is holding up OK.
That bike is bone stock! (Even has the plastic peddles)
You wore out the bottom bracket ?
That bike looks low miles to me. Well when I took my Trailway apart when it was new there was almost no grease in the bottom bracket that was 2 bearing races and a forged steel shaft. one small dab was all there was.
When I get a bike , I go through it and grease everything my self if it's not sealed.
If your front derailleur doesn't go wandering and then go clack clack ckack you got a winner.
If you haven't done it yet grease the wheel bearings, be careful in removing and installing the dust shields I 2 small pick tools and they came out nicely.
use the same tools to tuck them back in after greasing.
My wife picked this Trailway at Target after her Schwinn Skyliner went bad 2x on 2 rides, I had an old Brit 3 speed, my son then 4 or 5 had a performance bike.
Our bike rides where not a big deal to us then, as we rode more both my son and wife got better bikes the rides got longer and we really didn't have room for an extra bike so turning 50 I decided to take over her Schwinn as I had already started upgrading it for her, I rode it as It was for her but wanted something still lighter to carry up stairs so I started shopping for lighter parts. It never occurred to me there where light hybrids as even in the bike shops they where pretty heavy and the selection was thin.
I see from your stock bike my forks are 3 inches shorter. The change don't seem to affect anything negatively in fact I like leaning forward and being closer to the road without drop bars. I'm sure I could have bought a carbon road bike but at the time I would not have wanted carbon.
When I was a kid in the 70's I put so many miles on bikes, we lived out in the middle of nowhere so everything was at least 10 miles away .
I am riding now for 2 reasons to spend time with my family and to stay in shape.
I also love building up cars, motorcycles, guns and stereo's. It is perfectly normal for me to take something down and reconfigure it complacently using better parts.
I have been told I'm a little OCD.

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Old 04-27-16, 06:45 PM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by goraman View Post
I am always open to suggestions, but I am not sure who makes a frame that would take it's place.
Depending on your geometry preferences and colour preferences, Surly has two sub 5lb frames for your to consider, and as you would be replacing aluminium for steel with either of these bikes or the Soma, you should also get a noticeable improvement in ride quality.

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Old 04-28-16, 06:03 AM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by goraman View Post
That bike is bone stock! (Even has the plastic peddles)
You wore out the bottom bracket ?
I think so, it creaks and pops like crazy...and that's the knock on these Pacific Schwinns - made with inferior parts that won't hold up. I'm also a big guy and the frame is small for me and components are under more pressure than with the average rider. Getting into the BB is on my to-do list, but it's a long list

That bike looks low miles to me.
It has more than it looks like, I try to keep bikes clean. I restored my '82 Fuji at the same time I bought the Trailway, and the more serious I became getting back into cycling the more I rode the Fuji.

My wife picked this Trailway at Target after her Schwinn Skyliner went bad 2x on 2 rides
I had a Skyliner too and gave it to my older brother after getting the Trailway - For many years I'd ride around and around my block on the Skyliner at night for exercise.


When I was a kid in the 70's I put so many miles on bikes, we lived out in the middle of nowhere so everything was at least 10 miles away .
Same here, we have a lot in common. I lived downtown and it seemed like my only neighbors were old people - almost all my friends & schoolmates were a good distance away.

^^replied inside the quote^^
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Old 04-28-16, 07:38 AM
  #24  
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The rear hub came apart on the sky liner, then it got 2 flats from the spokes on the inside, same rear wheel so we returned it after 2 services at a bike shop and got the trailway.
I went through most of the Trailway my self and the bottom bracket had one small dab of amber colored grease, both bearing races where dry. Ditched them for a Shimano sealed BB.
Something like a UN55 was the modle number. Far smoother than stock.

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Old 04-28-16, 09:11 AM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
Depending on your geometry preferences and colour preferences, Surly has two sub 5lb frames for your to consider, and as you would be replacing aluminium for steel with either of these bikes or the Soma, you should also get a noticeable improvement in ride quality.

Pacer | Bikes | Surly Bikes

Cross-Check | Bikes | Surly Bikes
Thank you for checking out frames, If I change the frame it will be over winter, I like the Surly frames the best,
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