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Want To Replace Shock Fork With Rigid Fork

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Want To Replace Shock Fork With Rigid Fork

Old 11-04-16, 01:41 AM
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Scooty Puff Jr
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Want To Replace Shock Fork With Rigid Fork

2016 Fuji Crosstown 1.1 Disc

I have a typical 700c Suntour suspension fork with a threaded head and disc brakes, I want to replace it with a good ridged fork. Not looking so much for losing some weight, I don't need the suspension for my type of riding. Just asking the hybrid community what they think is a good ridged 700 disc threaded fork ?
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Old 11-04-16, 06:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Scooty Puff Jr View Post
2016 Fuji Crosstown 1.1 Disc

I have a typical 700c Suntour suspension fork with a threaded head and disc brakes, I want to replace it with a good ridged fork. Not looking so much for losing some weight, I don't need the suspension for my type of riding. Just asking the hybrid community what they think is a good ridged 700 disc threaded fork ?
First measure your axel to crown distance and account for sag, because that is the real geometry of the bike when it is actually being ridden. Ideally you want to keep the geometry of the bike, particularly head tube angle and bottom bracket height. A bike with suspension fork changes it's geometry while riding due to the travel of the fork so getting this number dead on is not too critical.

All that said, you could really go with any brand rigid fork. I know folks that swear by Niner or Specialized and also a few people who have used carbon rigid forks from Flyxxi (Chinese carbon).

I suggest you find something in your price range, that appeals to you aesthetically and do some homework on how those forks perform. Don't forget to talk to your LBS and if you squeeze them for knowledge be sure to support them.
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Old 11-04-16, 11:45 PM
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Check craigslist or other used bike ads for a 1990s era rigid fork mountain bike, or somewhat later hybrid with rigid fork. I see 'em every week priced around $100-$200. Trek, Giant, Specialized, Univega, mostly good brands, only a few discount chain clunkers. Might be cheaper than replacing the fork and it's an affordable way to see if you really prefer a rigid fork bike for trail or gravel riding.

I have both a hybrid with simple Suntour spring fork ($100 used) and a 1990s rigid fork mountain bike ($200, probably paid too much but I liked it). The older mountain bike is lighter and maybe a little quicker. But some days it hurts my back and neck to ride on rough stuff. Even wide reasonably wide tires at only 50 psi there's quite a bit of jolt compared with the other bike.

On days when my neck and back are bothering me I appreciate the more comfortable ride of the hybrid with suspension fork. And it's just as good, if not better, for the very modest pace I ride on gravel and chat trails. Riding over washboard ruts feels more secure with the suspension fork bike, and the wider tires grip better and ride straight through soft sand and pea gravel used to fill potholes. The rigid fork mountain bike and somewhat skinnier tires demand more attention on washboard ruts and tricky stuff, or it'll plow and twist a bit.

I like both bikes equally for the mix of smooth and rough pavement and gravel/chat trails I ride. Wouldn't want to do without either now.
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Old 11-05-16, 06:55 AM
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I don't actually know the answer to this but......
I found this while researching , and this makes sense.
Forks | Parts and Accessories | Surly Bikes
It seems that "suspension corrected" is the key element to this question.
I would mail Surly and see what they say about it.
Maybe armed with your head measurements , it might be easy to accomplish.
Most vendors are interested in helping , and increased sales are not a bad thing either.
At least this fork has fittings for almost anything you might need.
The steel would be tough enough for whatever you need also.
If you had to convert to threadless , it's not too hard to do anyway.
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Old 11-20-16, 11:38 PM
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Surley sells quality rigid forks. I recently had a cheap and heavy Rock Shock fork replaced by my LBS on my Gary Fisher Nirvana and it made a world of difference. If you're mechanically inclined you can probably do it yourself. I had the LBS do it because I wanted to make sure it was being done correctly and I didn't have time to experiment as I learned.
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Old 11-23-16, 12:34 PM
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can't you just tighten thumbs screws on top to make them harder? I had a bike like that & that's what I did. they were so soft the bike would dip down when I stopped. so annoying. but after tightening them down all the way I don't remember them compressing at all. but I think they came in handy riding at night went I hit stuff I didn't see
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