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Official Giant Roam Owners Thread

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Official Giant Roam Owners Thread

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Old 04-14-18, 10:55 PM
  #76  
Fbody4life
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Love the colors on that 2018.
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Old 04-18-18, 10:01 AM
  #77  
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Since I posted it on the Trek DS thread, I'll put it here as well. I test road a DS 2 and 3 yesterday and then a Roam 2. Very similar ride and you get better components for the money with Giant. Seems to be why a lot of you opted for the Roam over the DS. I will say my posture felt a little more comfortable on the DS but not a huge difference, I'm kind of in between a Medium and Large in Roams sizing, so that might be why. I'd love to test a Cannondale CX but our shop doesn't have any in stock.

Anyhow... those of you that aren't newbies like me... there's clearly more bang for your buck with the Giant... so why spend hundreds more on the Trek? Is it really just about name and cosmetics or are there other factors to steer one towards spending more and getting the Trek?
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Old 04-18-18, 11:27 AM
  #78  
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Originally Posted by IrishYorf07 View Post
Since I posted it on the Trek DS thread, I'll put it here as well. I test road a DS 2 and 3 yesterday and then a Roam 2. Very similar ride and you get better components for the money with Giant. Seems to be why a lot of you opted for the Roam over the DS. I will say my posture felt a little more comfortable on the DS but not a huge difference, I'm kind of in between a Medium and Large in Roams sizing, so that might be why. I'd love to test a Cannondale CX but our shop doesn't have any in stock.

Anyhow... those of you that aren't newbies like me... there's clearly more bang for your buck with the Giant... so why spend hundreds more on the Trek? Is it really just about name and cosmetics or are there other factors to steer one towards spending more and getting the Trek?
I just bought a Roam 2 (today), and I'm in the same boat as you on the sizing. I could have gone either way between medium and large. I typically prefer the largest frame size that I can stand over. I can stand over the large, flatfooted, and still lift the bike a good 2" before hitting bone, so that's good enough for me. It *feels* closer than it really is, because the *ahem* soft tissues will touch before bone will. But nearly all guidance regarding stand over is baselined on the pubic bones.

The other metric is reach. You feel this most in how far you have to lean forward, although reach is technically how far forward the head tube is from the vertical centerline of the crank spindle (not the distance from the saddle to the bar). If you can stand over a large, but feel that the handlebar is too far out there, you can adjust this with a replacement stem. You can get a shorter (and or taller) stem, or you can get an adjustable stem that will allow you to fine tune it yourself.

Fit is very much personal preference (your Giant dealer was right, even if he was a little flip about it). Some people like the feel of a smaller bike that they "sit on". Some people like the feel of a larger bike that they "sit in".

I think the Roam 2 is a great value. I'll take some pics and share my thoughts on it later today, especially comparing to the other new Giant that I recently bought (and returned).
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Old 04-18-18, 11:46 AM
  #79  
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Originally Posted by IrishYorf07 View Post
Anyhow... those of you that aren't newbies like me... there's clearly more bang for your buck with the Giant... so why spend hundreds more on the Trek? Is it really just about name and cosmetics or are there other factors to steer one towards spending more and getting the Trek?
As is the case in many retail sectors, there will be brands that can attract a price premium, despite being no better than an alternative option.

That is the case with the Trek DS series vs the Roam, as there would be no discernible difference in frame quality, nor choice in wheels, which is about the only two things manufacturers could claim to be their own.

Even with wheels it is arguable if that is the case, so perhaps it just comes down to the frame, as each manufacturer tends to choose various Shimano products to provide the running gear and brakes.

I think Trek who don't do their own manufacturing on aluminium framed bikes, get Giant to make their aluminium frames for them.

The above doesn't mean one shouldn't get a Trek DS, if you preferred the feel of it, or found a colour scheme that you liked a lot more. Those sorts of things are worth paying a price premium for.
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Old 04-18-18, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
I think Trek who don't do their own manufacturing on aluminium framed bikes, get Giant to make their aluminium frames for them.
The guy at my local Giant dealer (who used to work for the local Trek dealer before they left town) said that Giant generally offers a better value because they don't have to outsource as many parts. He said Giant extrude their own handlebars and seat posts and rim profiles. And they obviously make the frames for their bikes and many others, too. So they don't have to pay for Alex or Weinmann rims -- they just make their own. They don't have to pay for Promax stems or seat posts -- they just make their own. The DS 8.3 and the Roam 2 may be the best evidence of that. They're almost literally the same bike as far as components go, but the Roam is hundreds cheaper.

I'm generally a Trek fan, but Giant got me this time.
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Old 04-18-18, 02:26 PM
  #81  
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Ready for a new saddle for my Roam 1. What are some choices in the MTB sphere to look into? Either all black or with a touch of fluoro yellow to match the theme.
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Old 04-18-18, 04:08 PM
  #82  
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Originally Posted by hokiefyd View Post
The guy at my local Giant dealer (who used to work for the local Trek dealer before they left town) said that Giant generally offers a better value because they don't have to outsource as many parts. He said Giant extrude their own handlebars and seat posts and rim profiles. And they obviously make the frames for their bikes and many others, too. So they don't have to pay for Alex or Weinmann rims -- they just make their own. They don't have to pay for Promax stems or seat posts -- they just make their own. The DS 8.3 and the Roam 2 may be the best evidence of that. They're almost literally the same bike as far as components go, but the Roam is hundreds cheaper.

I'm generally a Trek fan, but Giant got me this time.
Trek has Bontrager to make a lot of their parts like stems, handlebars, wheels & even tyres, I suspect that Trek think they can get away with charging a bit extra, as opposed to Giant being that much less expensive to put a bike together.

I'm not saying that Giant's costs overall aren't less than Trek's, but I don't think that is the main reason for the price difference.

Blame Lance and the Trek connection.
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Old 04-18-18, 06:23 PM
  #83  
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Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
Trek has Bontrager to make a lot of their parts like stems, handlebars, wheels & even tyres, I suspect that Trek think they can get away with charging a bit extra, as opposed to Giant being that much less expensive to put a bike together.
I always thought that Bontrager didn't actually produce parts, but labeled parts (obviously to their spec). If they actually produce things, then my understanding of their operations may have been a little off!
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Old 04-18-18, 07:09 PM
  #84  
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Originally Posted by hokiefyd View Post
I always thought that Bontrager didn't actually produce parts, but labeled parts (obviously to their spec). If they actually produce things, then my understanding of their operations may have been a little off!
You are probably right.
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Old 04-19-18, 05:25 AM
  #85  
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How well does Giant Roam 3 fare against Trek DS1 and Scott Sub Cross 40?
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Old 04-19-18, 08:53 AM
  #86  
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Originally Posted by IrishYorf07 View Post
Since I posted it on the Trek DS thread, I'll put it here as well. I test road a DS 2 and 3 yesterday and then a Roam 2. Very similar ride and you get better components for the money with Giant. Seems to be why a lot of you opted for the Roam over the DS. I will say my posture felt a little more comfortable on the DS but not a huge difference, I'm kind of in between a Medium and Large in Roams sizing, so that might be why. I'd love to test a Cannondale CX but our shop doesn't have any in stock.

Anyhow... those of you that aren't newbies like me... there's clearly more bang for your buck with the Giant... so why spend hundreds more on the Trek? Is it really just about name and cosmetics or are there other factors to steer one towards spending more and getting the Trek?
IMO, the only reason I would have to get a Trek DS over the Giant Roam, is if I really want the remote lockout fork option and the Blendr stem that it comes with. I actually would have benefited from it, because I have a Bontrager front light, which would mount easily on the Blendr stem. I still chose the Roam 2 because I really like how it looks, I think it offers good value and the test ride was comfy and fun. I also decided that bending down to lock or unlock the front fork, wasn't worth spending more money on a different bike. I can also simply install a Bontrager Blendr stem on my Roam 2 later (if I really wanted to), or get the mount brackets for my Bontrager lights, which are like $5.99 a piece.
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Old 04-20-18, 12:16 PM
  #87  
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Originally Posted by finch204 View Post
Okay I got my first real ride done yesterday. Here are some pics of the 2018 Giant Roam 2. After my first ride, I quickly realized that I need to install a water bottle cage on it LOL. I also love that it comes with a free bike bell.













Nice! For me, I find the bell was more comically amusing than useful.
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Old 04-20-18, 02:39 PM
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Originally Posted by dueWest View Post
Nice! For me, I find the bell was more comically amusing than useful.
It is no doubt a cheap bell haha, but was still of use to me on my last ride. It is not that loud but at least dogs notice it, a lot earlier than their owners do. At times during my ride, on some curvy but not really bumpy pavement, the bell would softly ring. I was trying to look back checking who was coming up, only to realize it was my own bell ringing

This will do for now, until I decide to get a better one. I want a Spurcycle bell but they are pricey!
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Old 04-21-18, 05:41 AM
  #89  
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The bells I use are the $5 Schwinn jobs from Walmart. They're a push-the-lever-hear-it-jingle type bell rather than the single "bing" sound made by the stock Giant bells (and many others). I find the jingle bells to be heard by more people (especially with ear buds). The Schwinn bells are inexpensive and fairly small (compact). They're also pretty plain and simple looking (so they don't stand out).

Link to Amazon

I'm pretty sure these are like 5 bucks at Walmart.
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Old 04-22-18, 07:58 PM
  #90  
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The fork was sitting in the basement for months. Only this weekend that I started buying parts for rigid set up. Still waiting for headset, pedals, tires and front wheels QR adapter and of course a time to clean my Roam.
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Old 04-23-18, 08:37 AM
  #91  
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New saddle time for my '17 Roam 1. Ergon SMA3 Comp in Laser Lemon trim, perfect match.

Quite pleased, very supportive, smoother outer perimeter shaping compared to the oem Connect saddle and cushion on the right places.

My grips have been slipping, now thinking of going with the matching Ergon GE1's.



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Old 04-29-18, 06:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Roamer2 View Post
Took my Roam 2 Disc to Pocahontas State park up in Virginia this last weekend ...
What kickstand is that on your Roam 2?
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Old 04-29-18, 08:48 PM
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14 Roam 3

My wife and bought Giant Roam 3 for me and a Rove 3 for her. We didn't really know what we wanted but the yoing man was a sharp individual and really did sell us what we needed..we have put 2,000 miles on these things since weve had em.. We got Nexride noseless saddles and its the most comfortable bike seat ive ever sat on. Check em out you will like it. Nothing but your sit bones are on the seat.
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Old 04-30-18, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Imabmwnut View Post
My wife and bought Giant Roam 3 for me and a Rove 3 for her. We didn't really know what we wanted but the yoing man was a sharp individual and really did sell us what we needed..we have put 2,000 miles on these things since weve had em.. We got Nexride noseless saddles and its the most comfortable bike seat ive ever sat on. Check em out you will like it. Nothing but your sit bones are on the seat.
I checked out the Nextride noseless saddles and they look interesting... It sounds functional and makes sense to me so I might even give it a try. I took out my flatbar madone for a ride last Saturday and after riding a Roam for a week or so, the ride was less than ideal. I especially felt I needed a new saddle for my flatbar madone. Whereas on the Roam I stop riding because I'm tired, on my madone, I stop riding because the saddle is not comfortable.

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Old 05-01-18, 12:48 PM
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Buyers remorse!
I recently bought the 2018 Giant Escape 2 -- rather than the Giant Roam 3 (which I actually wanted) -- based on fairly consistent advice from a few local shops, as well as several threads on this website.

They basically said the Roam 3 (or similar hybrids like Trek DS)
  • is overkill for my use -- mostly roads/pavement (90%), but hopefully some light/easy dirt paths (10%)
  • is a cheap, low-quality suspension
  • the suspension slows me down, with its weight, and pogo effect (unless the lockout is very effective), except on the few trails I hope to eventually do.
  • adds maintenance (aka service cost)
  • fatter nubby tire also slows me down on roads
I suppose that's all true. Yet I assume all you happy Roam owners are.. happy with your Roam? Are you riding on trails way more than pavement? Why did you choose a suspension over a rigid fork? Should I have stuck with my gut, ignored the advice from the shop guys, and bought the Roam? Or were they right?
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Old 05-01-18, 02:13 PM
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Originally Posted by tex88 View Post
Buyers remorse!
I recently bought the 2018 Giant Escape 2 -- rather than the Giant Roam 3 (which I actually wanted) -- based on fairly consistent advice from a few local shops, as well as several threads on this website.

They basically said the Roam 3 (or similar hybrids like Trek DS)
  • is overkill for my use -- mostly roads/pavement (90%), but hopefully some light/easy dirt paths (10%)
  • is a cheap, low-quality suspension
  • the suspension slows me down, with its weight, and pogo effect (unless the lockout is very effective), except on the few trails I hope to eventually do.
  • adds maintenance (aka service cost)
  • fatter nubby tire also slows me down on roads
I suppose that's all true. Yet I assume all you happy Roam owners are.. happy with your Roam? Are you riding on trails way more than pavement? Why did you choose a suspension over a rigid fork? Should I have stuck with my gut, ignored the advice from the shop guys, and bought the Roam? Or were they right?
Road, paved and unpaved trails, gravel. canal towpaths/ hard packed sand, forest trails, grass....whatever i feel like basically outside of a techincal high speed MTB dirt jumping course, downhill, rock climbing....

I use the lockout when i remember to on rides where i'm focused on bolting from Point A to Point B, since out of the saddle its more efficient locked. I don't think about it much otherwise, just enjoy myself cruising and i like to playfully hop curbs, explore mixed terrain.

In a do-it-all kind of bike i chose the Roam for its flexility and comfort. The suspension is basic, and while it would be great if was Air susp. with at least 80mm of travel , it is designed around the frame geometry for its intended use- absorbs gashes on the road and keeps the jarr out of my hands and shoulders. I have no regrets, its a fun bike that's very comfy. Has tire clearance for much wider tires that improve its off road-manners, fender and rack mounts. Don't really need much more from it.

Does it fit your needs? Thats the question that determines a happy bike owner.

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Old 05-01-18, 02:28 PM
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Originally Posted by tex88 View Post
Buyers remorse!
I recently bought the 2018 Giant Escape 2 -- rather than the Giant Roam 3 (which I actually wanted) -- based on fairly consistent advice from a few local shops, as well as several threads on this website.

They basically said the Roam 3 (or similar hybrids like Trek DS)
  • is overkill for my use -- mostly roads/pavement (90%), but hopefully some light/easy dirt paths (10%)
  • is a cheap, low-quality suspension
  • the suspension slows me down, with its weight, and pogo effect (unless the lockout is very effective), except on the few trails I hope to eventually do.
  • adds maintenance (aka service cost)
  • fatter nubby tire also slows me down on roads
I suppose that's all true. Yet I assume all you happy Roam owners are.. happy with your Roam? Are you riding on trails way more than pavement? Why did you choose a suspension over a rigid fork? Should I have stuck with my gut, ignored the advice from the shop guys, and bought the Roam? Or were they right?
I have a similar story, though the bike shop worked with me. I bought a Giant ARX because I really wanted to try a newer rigid bike, because that's what we're "supposed" to like, right? Suspension is rubbish, slow, etc. Rigid is more efficient, etc. I never found comfort on that ARX and I returned it. And I bought a Roam. Before buying a Roam, I tried an Escape in the bike shop parking lot and I didn't like it. It was quite like the ARX. I'm sure it's fine for some, but it wasn't the right choice for me.

I enjoy the Roam because I'm comfortable on it. Speed is a non-issue to me; I don't care how fast I'm going. In theory, the more effort it takes, the more exercise I get, right? :-) Maintenance is a non-issue to me. These forks just don't seem to go wrong. Weight is a non-issue to me. When I was in Utah on vacation last month, I pedaled my dad's new e-bike (55 pounds heavy) 20 miles the first day we were there. No electric assist (and hub motor, so no drag, either). That taught me weight doesn't play a factor into my riding. The suspension fork really does make a difference in riding comfort. The hydraulic lockout works great. Locked out, the fork is, well, rigid. You feel everything. Unlocked, it's compliant, and you feel less. I like that. Others don't. And that's good for them (seriously -- everyone should be able to ride what they like).

Buy what YOU feel is right, what YOU feel most comfortable on. If that's a body-forward road bike with drop bars, cool. If it's a carbon fork fitness bike, cool. If it's something like a Roam or a Trek DS or Specialized Crosstrail, cool. If it's a real upright comfort bike like a Giant Cypress or Trek Verve or Jamis Citizen, cool. Nobody wins when someone buys a bike because it's what they were told they should like. Especially you -- it's YOUR money!

You haven't said that you dislike the Escape. If you like it, then keep on riding! The Roam rides quite a bit differently from the Escape (to me), so if you love one of them, it's not likely that you'll love the other one as much, whichever one that may be. Did you test ride the Roam when you bought the Escape?
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Old 05-02-18, 09:45 AM
  #98  
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Originally Posted by tex88 View Post
Buyers remorse!
I recently bought the 2018 Giant Escape 2 -- rather than the Giant Roam 3 (which I actually wanted) -- based on fairly consistent advice from a few local shops, as well as several threads on this website.

They basically said the Roam 3 (or similar hybrids like Trek DS)
  • is overkill for my use -- mostly roads/pavement (90%), but hopefully some light/easy dirt paths (10%)
  • is a cheap, low-quality suspension
  • the suspension slows me down, with its weight, and pogo effect (unless the lockout is very effective), except on the few trails I hope to eventually do.
  • adds maintenance (aka service cost)
  • fatter nubby tire also slows me down on roads
I suppose that's all true. Yet I assume all you happy Roam owners are.. happy with your Roam? Are you riding on trails way more than pavement? Why did you choose a suspension over a rigid fork? Should I have stuck with my gut, ignored the advice from the shop guys, and bought the Roam? Or were they right?
My first bike as an adult was a Trek Verve that had a suspension seatpost and suspension front fork. That bike was comfy and stable and relaxing. However as I continued riding it, I realized I wanted to go faster and faster and I couldn't on the Verve. I was basically using it as a fitness bike, but the Verve wasn't really made for that. In hindsight, I should have gotten a Trek FX or Specialized Sirrus, but I ended up trading in my Verve for a Trek Madone.

The Madone is great, if you ride it fast and on a road or if you have easy access to long bike trails. It is not so good for quick rides around the neighborhood. I kept the Madone and converted it to flat bars which made it a little more comfy for quick rides, but I still could not ride it anywhere.

So then I started using my brother's Trek FX2 for the quick rides around the neighborhood. This bike did not have a carbon fork, but did have 35 mm tires. It was better for quick rides around the neighborhood and could handle rough pavement, but it was just not as comfortable as my Verve. Which led me to the realization that what I was looking for was a combination of the Trek Verve and a Trek FX. I wanted the comfort from the Verve, but be able to ride the bike faster like on a Trek FX. This is how I ended up with a Trek DS, oh wait, a Giant Roam 2.

My rides with the Giant Roam 2 are like 90% pavement and 10% off-road. The off-road parts are mostly grassy terrain that I would not dare ride my Madone on, but am perfectly happy to ride through with my Roam. My pavement rides are not all on smooth roads, I ride a mix of residential streets, roads and sidewalks. The way I begin my ride, is I start riding the Roam out of the garage, through our grassy front lawn (because cars are blocking the driveway) and hop off the curb. I also do the reverse at times when I end my rides. There is a particular section of sidewalk that is long but choppy. I love riding my Roam through it. I purposely got a bike with the front suspension fork because of the comfortable ride it gives (from my experience with the Verve). The fork doesn't seem to get in the way, unless you try sprinting out of the saddle and forgot to lock it. I usually leave it unlocked on all my rides. I only locked it on that long ride I did that was on a well maintained paved bike path. I don't know about the tires slowing me down as I am equally as fast on the Roam 2 as I was on the FX 2. I will switch it out for semi slick tires in the future, but I'm keeping it at 38mm or might even go wider just to see how comfy it can get.
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Old 05-02-18, 07:55 PM
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ColonelSanders
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Originally Posted by finch204 View Post
I will switch it out for semi slick tires in the future, but I'm keeping it at 38mm or might even go wider just to see how comfy it can get.

If you got some Marathon Supremes 2" which apparently are 45mm when fitted onto a rim, you would have a very fast and comfy ride.


28.49 Euro each.
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Old 05-03-18, 06:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Jeff82 View Post
What kickstand is that on your Roam 2?
The LBS threw that in with purchase. It's a Greenfield "top plate" 305mm model. REI and Walmart carry them...along w/ Amazon, etc.

It has worked great & doesn't protrude or flop around off-road. I will caution that I have an XL frame & that particular model is intended for 22" & up frames. It would probably work fine on L & M frames,,,,but might need to be cut down for other applications.
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