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Hybrid with wide tires for longish rides on paved roads ?

Old 08-28-17, 05:48 AM
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pakeboi
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Hybrid with wide tires for longish rides on paved roads ?

Aloha ,
Around 700c x 45 mm .
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Old 08-28-17, 06:18 AM
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Trek Verve and Specialized Crossroads are two of the more commonly available hybrids with 700x45, though you can possibly fit 45mm tires on other models.
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Old 08-28-17, 07:08 AM
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Takes all of about 30 seconds to come up with some obvious candidates. Examples:

KONA BIKES | ROAD | DEW | Dr Dew
KONA BIKES | ROAD | ROVE | Big Rove AL
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/toughroad-slr-2-2018

Most 'hybrids' that come stock with 38+mm tires can easily fit a 45. Find bike you like at the right price, check tire clearance, change the tires. Simple.
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Old 08-28-17, 07:54 AM
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45's seem wide to me. I run 38's and even those feel a little wide sometimes.

Are you familiar with riding thinner tires? If not, you might want to dry it out first for pavement. See if you like it.
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Old 08-28-17, 08:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Skipjacks View Post
45's seem wide to me. I run 38's and even those feel a little wide sometimes.

Are you familiar with riding thinner tires? If not, you might want to dry it out first for pavement. See if you like it.

I run 50's on my 40km loop and average 20km/hr. There is no downside to wider tires unless you are trying to achieve a bit more speed, but if that's the case you should be on drop bars. The upside of wider rubber is more control and the ability to go places other bikes can't.
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Old 08-28-17, 08:52 AM
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Originally Posted by pakeboi View Post
Aloha ,
Around 700c x 45 mm .
Believe others have already listed bikes that come stock with larger tires. I haven't run anything in a 45 wide for my gravel rides, but do run Compass tires on a few bikes that take out the rough on pretty much anything. No downside to running wider tires at all, provided they aren't stiff side walled lead weights. Compass standard casings in a 700 x 44 weigh in at 378 grams. Super plush, and are a big weight savings over the Bontrager H2 case lite tires that come standard on several of Trek's FX bikes weighing a hefty 635 grams each for only 700 x 35.
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Old 08-28-17, 09:03 AM
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Wow -- those Compass tires are light! I've heard that Compass make some top-shelf stuff.

Puncture protection is often one of the main determinants of weight. One of my faves, the Continental Speed Ride, is a 42-622 (700x42) weighing in at 420 grams. And less than 25 bucks each! Downside -- little-to-no puncture protection. I haven't flatted yet, but I'm pretty ginger with how and where I ride.
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Old 08-28-17, 11:31 AM
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Originally Posted by coominya View Post
I run 50's on my 40km loop and average 20km/hr. There is no downside to wider tires unless you are trying to achieve a bit more speed, but if that's the case you should be on drop bars. The upside of wider rubber is more control and the ability to go places other bikes can't.
I think in terms of speed on dry pavement. Hence my propensity to go for a thinner tire. a 35-38mm tire gets me as off road as I typically need to go. (cut across hard pack dirty, stuff like that) Since I rarely have the need to plow through the mud a thicker tire is just giving me more drag with no upside.

Since I stay on dry pavement on my hybrid, thinner is better for me.

But if you do want to cut across a field or something regularly, running wider tires probably has more benefits than drawbacks. If you NEVER do that, wider tires are needless drag.

If I want to go out on the muck for fun, I've got a mountain bike with knobbies.
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Old 08-28-17, 01:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Skipjacks View Post
Since I rarely have the need to plow through the mud a thicker tire is just giving me more drag with no upside.
If your primary metric is speed, then you're not as interested in comfort as most are. The clear upside to a larger tire, regardless of the surface you ride, is comfort. You're able to ride a lower air pressure and maintain the same air volume, and comfort is increased dramatically. I would say that most don't have speed as their top priority, so a wider tire is generally a good recommendation, at least as something to consider. There are, of course, exceptions to everything.

This is likely why most of the bike industry is tending towards wider. The stated drawbacks of wider tires are often overcome by their advantages to many people.
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Old 08-28-17, 06:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Skipjacks View Post
I think in terms of speed on dry pavement.

I'll forgo the benefits around potholes and rail crossing of wider tires and leave you with this.

Wider tires roll faster than narrower ones: Riders have argued for years that narrower tires – especially on the road – roll faster and are more efficient than wider ones when in fact, the opposite is true. According to Wheel Energy, the key to reducing rolling resistance is minimizing the energy lost to casing deformation, not minimizing how much tread is in contact with the ground. All other factors being equal, wider casings exhibit less 'bulge' as a percentage of their cross-section and also have a shorter section of deflected sidewall.
Bicycle tires ? puncturing the myths - BikeRadar Australia

Myth No 2 – Skinny vs Wide : Skinny tyres go faster because they are more aerodynamic and lighter – WRONG
The guys at Bike Race Info explain it brilliantly (Bicycle Tires Explained)
“The people making the Torelli tires had noticed that the pro teams that they sponsored asked for 23s because they felt they were faster. When they investigated and did the testing, they found that the riders were correct. Here’s why ………
Let’s assume a 200 pound rider and bike unit. Let’s also assume that the weight is distributed half over each wheel. That means that each wheel is supporting 100 pounds. Now, with a pressure of 100 pounds per square inch, the contact patch is one square inch. This is true no matter how fat the tire.
What changes when the tire gets fatter is the shape of the contact patch. With a 20, the contact patch is a long oval. With the fatter tire, the contact patch gets shorter and wider.
When a rider is using a skinnier tire, the long contact patch means he is flexing a wider arc of the tire casing, flexing more of the tire, causing more wasted energy from the internal friction of the tire and tube. The rider with the fatter tire is flexing fewer cords at a time.
Bike Tyre Technology ? Myths Busted » RCA

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Old 08-28-17, 10:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Craptacular8 View Post
Believe others have already listed bikes that come stock with larger tires. I haven't run anything in a 45 wide for my gravel rides, but do run Compass tires on a few bikes that take out the rough on pretty much anything. No downside to running wider tires at all, provided they aren't stiff side walled lead weights. Compass standard casings in a 700 x 44 weigh in at 378 grams. Super plush, and are a big weight savings over the Bontrager H2 case lite tires that come standard on several of Trek's FX bikes weighing a hefty 635 grams each for only 700 x 35.
How are the Compass for flat protection ?
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Old 08-29-17, 07:40 AM
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Originally Posted by pakeboi View Post
How are the Compass for flat protection ?
There is no built in flat protection that I'm aware of. That said, in real world riding, they are not known for being flat prone. I've got around 250 miles of gravel on one set of extra lite casings with no flats, and 2 sets of standard casings on bikes that are road/touring only with around a 100 miles or so on each with no flats. They are just super nice riding tires, so I roll the dice. I value ride over flat protection.

For something wide, with built-in flat protection, that is not a boat anchor, I'd probably go with Panaracer Gravel King SK in the 700 x 40. They tend to run a little wider than stated width depending on the rim they are mounted on, and come in just under 500 grams each, so not too bad for a tire that wide. They get great reviews for flat protection and ride quality.
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Old 08-29-17, 07:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Skipjacks View Post
I think in terms of speed on dry pavement. Hence my propensity to go for a thinner tire. a 35-38mm tire gets me as off road as I typically need to go. (cut across hard pack dirty, stuff like that) Since I rarely have the need to plow through the mud a thicker tire is just giving me more drag with no upside.

Since I stay on dry pavement on my hybrid, thinner is better for me.

But if you do want to cut across a field or something regularly, running wider tires probably has more benefits than drawbacks. If you NEVER do that, wider tires are needless drag.

If I want to go out on the muck for fun, I've got a mountain bike with knobbies.
I've not found this to be the case at all. Most of my road bikes will not accept a tire wider than 700 x 25. I have them in as plush a tire as they can manage with 120 tpi sidewalls. I typically average 16-17mph on them in the flats. On my sport touring bike with Compass 700 x 35, the bike is substantially heavier than my road, however the tires are less than 50 grams heavier, with equal 120tpi sidewalls...similarly, 16-17mph on the flats. I have miles on either style bike where I exceed my average...sometimes I can hang at 20 with either for a while, but that's not what I can count on churning out mile after mile. I can really get that bike with the big tires flying over the pavement because pavement joints etc aren't beating the hell out of me. From my testing, I'd guess the results bear out that I average what I average on the road bikes with skinny tires because that's about all the beating I can stand. I would imagine given an equally light road bike frame that would handle say, 32's, my overall flat road average would probably kick up a bit more, and the only detriment of the sport touring bike is the overall weight of the bike and it's accouterments, rather than tire width.
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Old 08-29-17, 03:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Craptacular8 View Post
I've not found this to be the case at all. Most of my road bikes will not accept a tire wider than 700 x 25. I have them in as plush a tire as they can manage with 120 tpi sidewalls. I typically average 16-17mph on them in the flats. On my sport touring bike with Compass 700 x 35, the bike is substantially heavier than my road, however the tires are less than 50 grams heavier, with equal 120tpi sidewalls...similarly, 16-17mph on the flats. I have miles on either style bike where I exceed my average...sometimes I can hang at 20 with either for a while, but that's not what I can count on churning out mile after mile. I can really get that bike with the big tires flying over the pavement because pavement joints etc aren't beating the hell out of me. From my testing, I'd guess the results bear out that I average what I average on the road bikes with skinny tires because that's about all the beating I can stand. I would imagine given an equally light road bike frame that would handle say, 32's, my overall flat road average would probably kick up a bit more, and the only detriment of the sport touring bike is the overall weight of the bike and it's accouterments, rather than tire width.
Maybe I should be looking at steel , flat bar , adventure / gravel bikes ...
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Old 08-30-17, 06:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Craptacular8 View Post
There is no built in flat protection that I'm aware of. That said, in real world riding, they are not known for being flat prone. I've got around 250 miles of gravel on one set of extra lite casings with no flats, and 2 sets of standard casings on bikes that are road/touring only with around a 100 miles or so on each with no flats. They are just super nice riding tires, so I roll the dice. I value ride over flat protection.

For something wide, with built-in flat protection, that is not a boat anchor, I'd probably go with Panaracer Gravel King SK in the 700 x 40. They tend to run a little wider than stated width depending on the rim they are mounted on, and come in just under 500 grams each, so not too bad for a tire that wide. They get great reviews for flat protection and ride quality.
I don't recall seeing any discussion about tire pressure vs. flats, other than pinch flats from going too low. It would seem that since a lower pressure wide tire has less pressure on the ground, it would therefore have less force to drive a sharp object through the tread. The softer tire would tend to conform around the sharp object vs. the high pressure tire that would puts the entire weight of the bike and rider on the sharp object, making it more likely to puncture the tread. It's only a theory. I have no data to back it up, but I do seem to have more flats on my narrow tire road bikes than my hybrids and MTBs.
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Old 08-30-17, 03:30 PM
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Ditto, Conti Speed Rides. Outstanding values in all around hybrid tires. Love 'em for my local chipseal, rough pavement and gravel. Good enough for dry grass/entry level CX. They're quiet on smooth pavement. Grip well in rain. Adjust the tire pressure to suit rider weight, terrain and comfort.

Only reason I might change is if I lived in an area with mostly smooth, clean pavement, then I'd consider a lighter weight tire with little or no tread. Or if I planned a long single day ride like the Hotter'N Hell Hundred (which I skipped this year).
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Old 09-01-17, 12:47 PM
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Originally Posted by pakeboi View Post
Aloha ,
Around 700c x 45 mm .
What is your budget?

There are some very nice wide, 700c road tires and a rigid 29'er MTB with one of those tires makes an awesome bike. I'm riding a Karate Monkey with Maxxis Torch 29 tires, which are 50+mm and it's a perfect all-rounder bike.
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Old 09-01-17, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by pakeboi View Post
Aloha ,
Around 700c x 45 mm .
a Hardtail 29er will work fine.. Just fit smoother tread tires.





...
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Old 09-16-17, 05:13 PM
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prolly don't need 45s & they have potential for being too big to fit so might be well enough off w 40s or even 35s which a lot of bikes come with
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Old 09-16-17, 07:32 PM
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A Marin Muirwoods 29er has 42c stock tires. As an urban 29er, you have the option of running even wider 29 X 2.0 tires if the need should arise.

Hard to beat the recommended $770 MSRP for a double-butted steel bike but you could find it cheaper with previous year's models. A solid value.
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Old 09-29-17, 11:32 PM
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2017 Trek FXS5

I just purchased a 2017 trek fx s5 hybrid and had my LBS install 32mm bontrager tires in lieu of the standard 25mm. I asked my LBS tech if I could put wider tires, he said probably not. What do you guys think? I would like to go with 38mm tires, but I'm concerned they would rub against the rear frame. Please advise.
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Old 09-30-17, 02:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Troy1 View Post
I just purchased a 2017 trek fx s5 hybrid and had my LBS install 32mm bontrager tires in lieu of the standard 25mm. I asked my LBS tech if I could put wider tires, he said probably not. What do you guys think? I would like to go with 38mm tires, but I'm concerned they would rub against the rear frame. Please advise.


In this photo of a 2017 FX S5, it doesn't look like there's a lot of tire clearance with the 25mm tires in the photo. I'd estimate that 32mm may be about as big as you can go. One or two sizes up from what a bike comes with is usually about the limit. The area of the chain stays near the bottom bracket is often where there's not enough room for a bigger tire. How much clearance do you have in that area with the 32mm's? Even the fork looks to me like it may not fit much more than a 32mm though.

I notice the 2018 comes with 32mm tires, so Trek probably decided to design in more tire clearance in the current model. What is it you don't like about the 32mm's? Those should be pretty comfortable on paved roads and do okay on mild gravel roads.
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Old 09-30-17, 04:43 AM
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maybe then, that's not the bike for you
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Old 10-03-17, 08:49 PM
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I ride an older Fuji Absolute 1.0 that easily takes the Vittoria Voyager Hyper 38s that I run on it and it probably would do 45s if someone makes any as efficient as the Voyagers. I could not tell you if the newer models take tires that wide. When I think of getting a new bike I look at aluminum framed adventure touring bikes, the Trek 920 for example. Titanium would be nice but not in the budget right now. In fact my Fuji is still too good to replace. But those Vittorias roll very well and the hazards you face every mile on a road ride leave me happy to be running 38s.
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