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How much should I spend on buying a hybrid bike?

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How much should I spend on buying a hybrid bike?

Old 09-03-17, 03:07 PM
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Sudhish
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How much should I spend on buying a hybrid bike?

I'm a high school student and I'm planning on buying an $800 hybrid bike. I would use it to go to school, work, mall, grocery stores and etc. I have an old bike (from Canadian tire for $200) but it's broke and I can't ride on it (thought of fixing it but turns out it's $100 which is more than the value of the bike.) I was wondering if I need to get a better lock or buy a cheaper bike for maybe $500. I really wouldn't wanna lose my bike since I'm putting all my savings on it.
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Old 09-03-17, 05:25 PM
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Thread moved to Hybrids forum.
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Old 09-03-17, 06:35 PM
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What is broken on your current bike? I would personally recommend keeping your current bike going if you can and saving the $800. Older bikes are certainly less likely to get stolen than shiny new ones, so you stand a better chance of keeping your bike as well!
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Old 09-03-17, 07:51 PM
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My old bike needs something called a hub overhaul and unfortunately, the person in the bike store says that it's too dangerous to ride on it. Also, the bike itself would only be worth probably $20-30 now and I should be getting a tune up as well which totals to $170. The thing is, it's an old bike and it's very heavy and all that. So I guess I definitely need a new bike. But my question is, is it okay if I spend lesser money $400-500? Since I pretty much do all my commuting in a single bike (riding long distances) I need a good bike which makes it a bit easier and not making me completely exhausted by the end of the day.
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Old 09-03-17, 08:01 PM
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Without seeing the bike, it's hard to say if your bike is repairable for cheap. A hub overhaul should just involve new bearings and grease. A hub replacement with new would be quite a bit more money. Your bike shop may be quoting you work to try to encourage you to buy a new bike off the showroom.

You can absolutely make any level or price of bike work for you. The most important factor is fit. Find a brand and model that fits you well and then decide how much you want to spend. Most models offer different "levels", with better components on the bike as you go up in price. The middle grade models often offer the best value. You can spend 400 USD and get a pretty decent entry level hybrid bike (like a Giant Escape or similar). You can certainly spend more -- and you get more, too. Whether better components are worth it to you, only you can decide that. Personally, I generally stay in the middle ground somewhere, but there's value at the top and bottom of the food chain, too.
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Old 09-04-17, 12:58 PM
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Lots of hybrids that make great commuters, for less than $500. I ride a Marin Fairfax SC1, 10+ miles commute each way, and have done several metric centuries on it. I had an Escape 2 before, which has an even lower price point, and it rode just fine.
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Old 09-04-17, 09:41 PM
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Oh that sounds like a good idea I'll check those bikes out thanks!
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Old 09-04-17, 10:12 PM
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Buy whatever floats your boat. Its all in the rider, not the bike.
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Old 09-04-17, 10:28 PM
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I would not spend $800 on any "hybrid" bicycle.

In fact, I had one. The fit was terrible and the suspension worse, and I got the use out of it I needed--for $130. I sold it for $65 when I built my new commuter.

You can get an awesome bike on Craigslist for $2-300. $800 for a hybrid bike is a joke; it's just a 90s mountain bike with new parts.
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Old 09-05-17, 12:00 AM
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Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
I would not spend $800 on any "hybrid" bicycle.

You can get an awesome bike on Craigslist for $2-300. $800 for a hybrid bike is a joke; it's just a 90s mountain bike with new parts.
Totally agree. Definitely there are good hybrids for $800, but there are other options in that price range. If the OP has to burn $800 on the new bike he can also look at (at least ask the shop to test ride) something like Giant Revolt 3 for $870. Or Bianchi Lupo for $999. Or some similar all-round/gravel bikes. There is a list here: https://www.cyclingabout.com/complet...re-road-bikes/ (prices may be not up to date). A drop bar bike will probably make things easier. I would just save a bit more and get such a bike.

Also, the make/model of the original bike may help people figure out if it is worth fixing. How long is the commute? Are there any hills?
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Old 09-05-17, 06:01 AM
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Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
$800 for a hybrid bike is a joke; it's just a 90s mountain bike with new parts.
I wouldn't spend $800 on a hybrid, either, but owning both a 2015 hybrid bike and a 1995 mountain bike, I have to say that they're not even in the same ballpark. One is in Wrigley Field in Chicago and the other is in Yankee Stadium in New York. Geometry is different, frame materials are entirely different, wheel size is entirely different (which really changes how the bike feels). Not in the same class at all.

If you had a hybrid and the fit was terrible, that's unfortunate. You'd have likely been happier with one that fit properly. This forum is full of people who enjoy the genre. I'm sorry that you didn't. What make and model was it?
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Old 09-05-17, 06:32 AM
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If you enjoy riding, you'll enjoy a nice bike. My first hybrid was $700, and that was back in 2004's money.

Theft is a concern, and I don't know how to advise you there. Buy a good U-lock, I think, and also a chain lock. Use both. The one time I've had a bike stolen was when I rode it to classes at college. I had neglected locking it that day.

It's not unheard of to have an expensive bike for recreation, and a cheaper throwaway bike for commuting and leaving locked outside all day.
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Old 09-05-17, 08:25 AM
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As others have said, if you're on a budget for a new hybrid bike, you don't have to spend more than $500. Every major manufacturer makes something in the $450-500 range. In my looking around, Fuji had the cheapest and Felt was not far behind.

Additionally, if you're really on a budget and concerned about theft, used is the way to go. You should be able to get what you need for $250-300. Most people who buy bikes barely end up riding them. There are so many barely ridden used bikes out there.
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Old 09-05-17, 09:15 AM
  #14  
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A more expensive hybrid is going to have higher quality components that make it ride smoother and easier. (At least in theory. It does not always work out that way) I mean wheel bearings that roll a little smooth, bottom brackets that don't have as much resistance, etc etc etc

That's great if you're 50 and your body isn't quite as durable as it used to be.

But you're in high school. You're young. You don't tired out as fast. You recover from exhaustion faster. Go with the cheaper bike. You're unlikely to notice the difference in component quality. And you're young enough that it won't make much of a difference to you if you did.

When I was in high school I would be physical from dawn til dusk and get up the next day and do it again feeling great. Today that would literally kill me. As as result I have a bike that rolls a little smoother, but I can also afford it without depleting all my savings. So it's worth a little extra to me, MUCH more than it would have been worth to me when I was 18. So go with the cheaper bike as long as you test ride it and it feels good.

Also....factor in any growth you have left. If you're 14 and going into your freshman year you might grow another few inches, which would dramatically affect what the right size bike is for you. You don't want to spend $800 on a bike that you might grow out of with 1 more decent growth spurt. On the other hand if you're 18 and haven't gotten taller in 2 years you're probably through that phase of your life and won't have to consider outgrowing a bike.

My other advice to you is this...

Don't get sucked into the biking hobby now! You're too young! At your age you're giving an extra 10-15 years of money away on this hobby that ALWAYS has a new shiny thing you just NEED every few months! By delaying your entry into bicycling until you're 30 you will save trillions upon trillions of dollars (roughly....I rounded up slightly)

I'm kidding. It's awesome that you're young and biking. You'll stay fit and healthy and might never have to deal with things like heart disease and cholesterol and all that crap. But it is expensive. That part was no joke.
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Old 09-05-17, 12:29 PM
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Is a used bike out of the question? If price is an issue, why not look for a good used hybrid? You may be able to cut the price in half and may possible have accessories that you may like as well.
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Old 09-05-17, 08:59 PM
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One good thing to learn is how to wrench and fix bikes. It really is easy, most at least. Even for a new bike, at some point it needs a tune-up. Do you want to pay a shop all the time?

so what does a used bike need assuming nothing obvious is broken?
- service hubs: mostly cup/cone and is easy to do and adjust
- service headset: also easy
- adjust derailleur, brakes, fix flats, realce cables.... just normal wear

All the above is easy and only requires simple tools
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Old 09-08-17, 01:47 PM
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Not sure why there's some hybrid hate here-- an $800 hybrid will usually get you a carbon fork for better compliance and vibration control, a better gearset (my FX 7.4 has Deore instead of the typical Acera/Alivio shifters) and other niceties.

I have a 2002 Bianchi Veloce, a 2015 Trek FX 7.4 and a late 90's Trek mountain bike. Each has their uses. I use the hybrid as much as the Veloce and more than the MTB-- it's great for recreational trips to a store or farmer's market or brewery, I do a lot of mixed gravel/pavement road riding and I also use it for week long bike trips, which we usually do every summer.

All that said: I agree with the advice above, at your age look for a good used bike or go for a $500 entry level hybrid from a good bike maker. They all have hybrids around that price that will be very good for a young rider and which will last for decades if you take care of it.
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Old 09-08-17, 09:41 PM
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Both Craigslist and FB marketplace have a lot of nice hybrid bikes for sale.. Im always tempted to buy 1 almost every week. In my area someone is selling a 2016 Giant roam3 just for $250. Saw the bike and the chainrings and tire thread from the look of it, it only ridden less a hundred miles.

If you're under budget and concern of theft just buy a used one. Buying a $800 hybrid bike is a bad idea.
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Old 09-09-17, 05:07 AM
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This time of year you can often find end of the year sales as the dealers are looking to get rid of last years models before next season
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Old 09-10-17, 07:13 PM
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So I finally bought a bike based on the comments so thanks very much.

I bought the cannondale quick 8 for $500 instead of the bad boy 4 which was the $800 bike and to be honest I didn't find any differences in both bikes when rode it. I wasn't able to buy the $800 bike since the total came up to $1100 with accessories like a lock, which exceeded the amount of money that I had. The bike has an aluminium frame, an acera gear(I'm not sure what the exact word is) and a regular cable breaks. I just want to know if I made the right choice about choosing the brand since I just bought the bike because of its look.
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Old 09-10-17, 07:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Sudhish View Post
I bought the cannondale quick 8 for $500 instead of the bad boy 4 which was the $800 bike and to be honest I didn't find any differences in both bikes when rode it. I wasn't able to buy the $800 bike since the total came up to $1100 with accessories like a lock, which exceeded the amount of money that I had. The bike has an aluminium frame, an acera gear(I'm not sure what the exact word is) and a regular cable breaks. I just want to know if I made the right choice about choosing the brand since I just bought the bike because of its look.
If you like it, you bought th right bike!

A major bike company like Cannondale wouldnít put out a crappy bike. Thatís true across most reputable brands. What you buy as you move up the price ladder can be significant if you are a frequent, daily rider, many miles a week, or seeking to use it for long tours, etc. but for many people, the $300 jump from the base to a higher version might mostly go unnoticed.

The way I use my hybrid, Iím happy I am a bit up the ladder, though not at the top (a Trek FX 7.4, which brings 9 speed cassettes, a better derailleur and a carbon fork). But your mileage may vary based on your use. For most, even me, a carbon framed $2000 hybrid with road bike gear sets really misses the point of a hybrid.
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Old 09-10-17, 07:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Sudhish View Post
I bought the cannondale quick 8 ... I just want to know if I made the right choice about choosing the brand since I just bought the bike because of its look.
Cannondale is a reputable brand, and liking the look is imho an important part of the purchasing decision.
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Old 09-10-17, 08:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Sudhish View Post
I bought the cannondale quick 8 for $500 instead of the bad boy 4 which was the $800 bike and to be honest I didn't find any differences in both bikes when rode it.I just want to know if I made the right choice about choosing the brand since I just bought the bike because of its look.
Definitely a great bike! It has a chromoly fork which is great. Overall it is a more performance oriented hybrid which is great as well. The only downside I can see is that it has a freewheel in the back instead of a cassette. A cassette is easier to change, and there is a wider range of cassettes. If this becomes a major problem for you in the future (say, you want to change between something like 13-26 and 11-34 cassettes) you can replace the rear wheel with a freehub one (maybe rebuild the present one with a new hub), put an 8s or 9s cassette and change the shifter.
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Old 09-11-17, 11:52 AM
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For me probably under 1000 CDN. There are many nicer hybrids above 1000 price point. But I would rather get a roadbike if I am going to spend more.

I'm pretty happy with my trek FX
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Old 09-12-17, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Sudhish View Post
I bought the cannondale quick 8 for $500 instead of the bad boy 4 which was the $800 bike and to be honest I didn't find any differences in both bikes when rode it. I wasn't able to buy the $800 bike since the total came up to $1100 with accessories like a lock, which exceeded the amount of money that I had. The bike has an aluminium frame, an acera gear(I'm not sure what the exact word is) and a regular cable breaks. I just want to know if I made the right choice about choosing the brand since I just bought the bike because of its look.
If you like the frame and it's well made (It's a Cannondale so it is well made) everything else on the bike is just details.

If you become so experienced as a rider that you decide you need a better bottom bracket or different gearing options or stronger brakes or a more lightweight flexible fork or a better LITERALLY ANYTHING ELSE you can upgrade the stock components in the future.

Some upgrades are relatively cheap. Some can get pricey. But as long as the frame is good anything else on the bike can be improved as you become a more experienced rider with improving needs. Yes, the $100 upgrade here and the $75 upgrade there does add up over time...but that's over time. If the $500 bike is what you need today and you spend $400 more over the next 10 years to get to where the $800 bike was....so what? When you get to college take an economics class and when you learn about the time value of money you'll feel great about your decisions!

In other words, ya done did good, kid.
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