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Old 11-13-17, 11:39 PM   #51
Scooty Puff Jr
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Scooty, what do you ride mostly?
Don’t know how I missed your post earlier, anyhow welcome to the forum! You’re not far from me at all, I live in St Pete but I ride the Pinellas Trail into Clearwater and Tarpon Springs most every Saturday. I ride a Trek FXS6 for my weekday fitness rides and take my Surly Ogre out on my Saturday “beer and tacos” ride. . Once you get settled in on your bike we could meet in downtown St. Pete for some tacos !
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Old 11-13-17, 11:39 PM   #52
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As I mentioned previously, I'd be concerned about the chainline and Q-Factor.


A double 11 speed XTR/XT mountain bike crank tends to have a chainline of 50mm if it isn't a boost version and Q-Factors between 158 to 168mm.
since you own a toughroad,

what tires would you recommend for it?
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Old 11-13-17, 11:43 PM   #53
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Don’t know how I missed your post earlier, anyhow welcome to the forum! You’re not far from me at all, I live in St Pete but I ride the Pinellas Trail into Clearwater and Tarpon Springs most every Saturday. I ride a Trek FXS6 for my weekday fitness rides and take my Surly Ogre out on my Saturday “beer and tacos” ride. . Once you get settled in on your bike we could meet in downtown St. Pete for some tacos !
Hell yea.. and that Trek is a Beast of a Bike.. a lil out of my price range hahahaha

I am not familar with the Surly Ogre.. but I dig the name of it.
*just looked up the Surly Ogre.. That bike looks so Rad.. def looks like a Beer and Taco Bike that can take a beating.. I like the style of it.. Rugged..

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Old 11-14-17, 12:03 AM   #54
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since you own a toughroad,

what tires would you recommend for it?

Keep in mind that I use German online stores to buy just about all my stuff(except for the bike(s) themselves), so I get great prices, but I have to deal with their flat rate of postage which is about 20Euro, whether you buy one tyre or 20 tyres.


So when I bought a heap of accessories and whatever, the unit cost savings made the postage cost effectively irrelevant.


There has been the odd time when Chain Reaction or Wiggle or Evans Cycles made more sense, but usually the Germans for me.


Because I really hate changing flat tyres, I went for Schwalbe's Marathon Mondials, where I got the 50mm 29" tyres for 31.01 Euro's.(You need to be logged in to the site to see the price LESS the 19% VAT, which won't apply to American orders).


The Mondials are Schwalbe's 2nd best anti-puncture tyres and close to their longest wearing tyre.


As a folding tyre, it is also easier to get on to the rim than the wired Marathon Plus tyres, which whilst they do provide a bit more puncture protection, are also about 200grams per tyre heavier and aren't as fast.


If you still value flat protection but are more concerned with speed, you could consider either the Schwalbe Marathon Almotion for 25.13 Euro, or the Schwalbe Marathon Supreme for 31.01 Euro


Now throw in some tubes you may need, some brake pads, handlebar grips, pedals etc, and you will find you have got a great deal overall, despite the flat postage cost.
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Old 11-14-17, 12:28 AM   #55
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Keep in mind that I use German online stores to buy just about all my stuff(except for the bike(s) themselves), so I get great prices, but I have to deal with their flat rate of postage which is about 20Euro, whether you buy one tyre or 20 tyres.


So when I bought a heap of accessories and whatever, the unit cost savings made the postage cost effectively irrelevant.


There has been the odd time when Chain Reaction or Wiggle or Evans Cycles made more sense, but usually the Germans for me.


Because I really hate changing flat tyres, I went for Schwalbe's Marathon Mondials, where I got the 50mm 29" tyres for 31.01 Euro's.(You need to be logged in to the site to see the price LESS the 19% VAT, which won't apply to American orders).


The Mondials are Schwalbe's 2nd best anti-puncture tyres and close to their longest wearing tyre.


As a folding tyre, it is also easier to get on to the rim than the wired Marathon Plus tyres, which whilst they do provide a bit more puncture protection, are also about 200grams per tyre heavier and aren't as fast.


If you still value flat protection but are more concerned with speed, you could consider either the Schwalbe Marathon Almotion for 25.13 Euro, or the Schwalbe Marathon Supreme for 31.01 Euro


Now throw in some tubes you may need, some brake pads, handlebar grips, pedals etc, and you will find you have got a great deal overall, despite the flat postage cost.
I like the idea of tubeless.. can you go tubeless with these? The tires that come with the ToughRoad are Tubeless I believe..

I do want flat protection + speed
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Old 11-14-17, 12:30 AM   #56
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Here you go Colonel, they’re about 4 inches wide, this pic is of my T780s that are about 4 years old, they’ve been on a couple bikes, taken a lot of abuse, and are now on my Surly. They still spin like new, can’t go wrong with XT stuff.


These do look like solid Pedals that I will get and when I am ready to go clipless, these will already be on the bike..
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Old 11-14-17, 12:37 AM   #57
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I like the idea of tubeless.. can you go tubeless with these? The tires that come with the ToughRoad are Tubeless I believe..

I do want flat protection + speed

Something to keep in mind is that there is generally a trade off between flat protection and speed, although some are suggesting that Tubeless may be the Holy Grail here and get around that trade off.


Both the Marathon Supreme and Almotion have tubeless varieties.


Do yourself a favour and have a long browse of Bike24, you will be amazed at their range, whether it is to do with standard bike parts or racks, rack bags, frame bags, saddle bags, locks, tools etc.
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Old 11-14-17, 07:19 AM   #58
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A very small platform.
Not really, especially for occasional use they should be more than fine.
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Old 11-14-17, 07:25 AM   #59
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I like the idea of tubeless.. can you go tubeless with these? The tires that come with the ToughRoad are Tubeless I believe..

I do want flat protection + speed
Which do you want more? There is a trade off. For years, I used Panaracer Ribmo for flat protection. Performance was decent. This year, I decided to go to Continental GP4000s ii.

As far as tubeless, I would ask why you want that. As far as I can tell, the main advantage of tubeless is, in mountain biking, it allows you to ride as much lower pressures without pinch flatting. But if you are riding on the road, you will be riding at relatively higher pressures.
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Old 11-14-17, 07:52 AM   #60
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So, I looked at many brands, and types.. Raleigh, Trek, Specialized, Cannondale, Diamondback and Giant..

At first, I knew I wanted a bike.. But didn't know what I was going for.. I knew I didn't want a strictly Road Bike.. But wasn't sure if I wanted to go full Mountain.. so.. I looked at some comfort Bikes.. various brands.. and they were ok.. But I kinda wanted "more".. I had been so out of the loop for years that I didn't understand components and why someone would want one over the other.. so.. I began researching and studying all of the diff types and level of quality.. IE: Shimano Tourney, Altus, Acera, Alivio, Deore, SLX, XT and Sram's line.. I stuck with the Mountain Bike gearing rather than learn much about Shimano 105, Tiagra etc.. Because I wanted hearty gears that could do some trails if need be.. and gearing for inclines if I wanted. Plus.. Rim vs Mechanical Disc vs Hydraulic Disc Brakes.. Then learned about 1X 2X 3X cranks and why people chose them.. I am fine with a decent 3X crank..
I definitely set on FlatBars.. and Id like to be under $1k.. I want Hydraulic Disc brakes.. atleast Acera Grade Components.. and though I want to Mod out the Bike.. I don't want to be in a rush to.. so as I grow in cycling, I could upgrade when I feel I want that bit extra.. when the difference would actually matter..

What really sold me on Giant was.. Giant's Bikes seemed to have most of what I want at prices that seemed to beat out brands like Trek.. and Treks are made at Giant's Factory.. Treks are great bikes.. but every bike of Trek that I found that fit what I wanted.. was over $1k..
Lots of shops around here have tons of Giants for me to look at..

My buddy this weekend bought a Giant Talon 3 which is a great deal for the $520 he paid.. I rode it and it is nice..
Though the Talon is def a strict Mountain bike..

I test Rode the Giant Toughroad SLR 1 today.. and dude.. Holy **** that bike is Light.. I know Carbon road bikes are lighter.. But.. Yo.. haha less than 25lbs.. and even with those big Tires on it, it rides well.. after talking with the people at the store, the guy showed me a bunch of things I could do with the bike later if I wanted to mod it out.. and there are suspension options out there from Rockshox if I wanted to go that route later.. Plus The frame can handle both 27.5/29er wheels/tires.. So If I found myself riding trails more.. I could transform it into a pretty capable hardtail... Im just blabbering a bit now.. but I like options..
the mods Id consider sooner would be a 3X Crank geared with a Bigger Cog like 48 or 50 tooth big cog while maintaining having a mid to high 20's tooth small cog IE: 48/36/26 crankset.. Shimano Deore has a couple choices(not right away)
Id prob also switch to a Deore Shadow rear Derailer(still down the road a bit)
Switching the seat to a Cloud 9(comfy as hell).. Maybe Handlebar ends like the fastroad has..
When I am done.. the Bike will be like a fat wheeled Fastroad SLR1 haha.. Not as quick.. But not much slower either.

I hope I answered thorough enough without going in too many directions
Have you tried drop bars? They are awesome. Properly sized, you can ride all day with drop bars without hand fatigue. Not so with flat bars that lock you into basically one position. (OK, two if you get bar ends, but when riding with bar ends, you can't shift or brake) Not talking about super narrow ones you sometimes see little skinny guys ride, but drop bars properly sized for your size. They are awesome. Way better than flat bars because they put your hands and wrists in a more natural position when riding on the hoods. For longer rides, flat bars are more limiting, and you find yourself looking for work arounds like bar ends or butterfly bars.

RE: Saddles. Big soft saddles like Cloud 9 might seem like a solution but for most, they cause more problems than they solve. You need support on your sit bones. And it is hard to gauge what works until you ride for at least a few weeks straight.
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Old 11-14-17, 08:14 AM   #61
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Im for flat bars for seating position. After I own the bike awhile I'll gauge which direction Im leaning and will first rent a proper drop bar bike and see how I like it. But yes Years ago Ive ridden drop bars and triathlon type bikes. My uncle use to run the iron man so Id use his bike when on vacation. But its Been years.
As for seat.. I just know most of the seats Ive been on.. hurt lol
The toughroad's admittingly was the best of them though I tested.
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Old 11-14-17, 08:31 AM   #62
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As far as bike parts go, I’ve ordered from Wiggle and Evans, and while the price was good it takes some time to get them here. I’ve had very good experiences with Jensen USA, Bike Tires Direct, Modern Bike, and you can’t forget Amazon since they have that distribution center in Brandon, you sometimes get your parts the next day !
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Old 11-14-17, 08:48 AM   #63
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Im for flat bars for seating position. After I own the bike awhile I'll gauge which direction Im leaning and will first rent a proper drop bar bike and see how I like it. But yes Years ago Ive ridden drop bars and triathlon type bikes. My uncle use to run the iron man so Id use his bike when on vacation. But its Been years.
As for seat.. I just know most of the seats Ive been on.. hurt lol
The toughroad's admittingly was the best of them though I tested.
Tri bikes are not what I am talking about. Triathlon bikes are extremely aggressive. Talking about endurance road bikes, light touring bikes, and touring adventure bikes. , and the type of bar has nothing to do with the seating position. That is more about frame design.
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Old 11-14-17, 08:48 AM   #64
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As far as bike parts go, I’ve ordered from Wiggle and Evans, and while the price was good it takes some time to get them here. I’ve had very good experiences with Jensen USA, Bike Tires Direct, Modern Bike, and you can’t forget Amazon since they have that distribution center in Brandon, you sometimes get your parts the next day !
Ill def check the others.. Im already an Amazon Prime addict.. I decided Im going to initially get the Alivio Crank 48/36/26.. I REALLY liked the roam's gears when I tested it.. and this way Id get that higher gear until Im ready to upgrade the entire drivetrain to 10 speed xt..
I just have a thing with personalizing stuff.. making things geared for me..

Oh the cloud 9 I was looking at wasn't that Yuge ass seat its only a lil fatter than the stock seat.. and only slightly wider.
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Old 11-14-17, 08:50 AM   #65
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Tri bikes are not what I am talking about. Triathlon bikes are extremely aggressive. Talking about endurance road bikes, light touring bikes, and touring adventure bikes. , and the type of bar has nothing to do with the seating position. That is more about frame design.
I thought drop bars have you bent over a lot more
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Old 11-14-17, 10:02 AM   #66
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I thought drop bars have you bent over a lot more
Nope. If you look closely, you will see the flat bar Fast-road is more aggressive than the drop bar AnyRoad. You can set up your bars more aggressive or more upright.drop bars are, IMO far more versatile. Flat bars loess so.
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Old 11-14-17, 10:08 AM   #67
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Nope. If you look closely, you will see the flat bar Fast-road is more aggressive than the drop bar AnyRoad. You can set up your bars more aggressive or more upright.drop bars are, IMO far more versatile. Flat bars loess so.
Interesting.. Ill have to test ride one.
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Old 11-14-17, 10:14 AM   #68
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On another note..
The Raleigh Redux 3 Urban Assault Bike that
Retails for $900 can be bought for $550 if you set up a corporate account with a code. Check the specs its a solid cruiser commuter bike. 1x11 with very decent stock
Components.. great bike to leave stock..

The corporate sale code when creating account is:

CYCLE4TAW
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Old 11-14-17, 11:46 AM   #69
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Nope. If you look closely, you will see the flat bar Fast-road is more aggressive than the drop bar AnyRoad. You can set up your bars more aggressive or more upright.drop bars are, IMO far more versatile. Flat bars loess so.
I think this all depends on the rider, I'm very uncomfortable in the down position on road bars, much more strain on my neck and back. I guess its from all the years of riding BMX and Motocross that I prefer flatbars, plus I don't have any issues with hand pain and I've road many 100 mile centuries. I find I can change my hand position fine on flatbars, especially with ergo grips, I never have had bar ends either, plus I get more torque climbing hills with flatbars. If you hunched way over with a lot of weight on your hands you will have pain, the object is to get in a riding position where your weight is more towards the seat.

If anyone wants flatbars and is concerned about hand positions, there's many flat bar options out there that give you multi hand positions too.
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Old 11-14-17, 12:46 PM   #70
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I think this all depends on the rider, I'm very uncomfortable in the down position on road bars, much more strain on my neck and back. I guess its from all the years of riding BMX and Motocross that I prefer flatbars, plus I don't have any issues with hand pain and I've road many 100 mile centuries. I find I can change my hand position fine on flatbars, especially with ergo grips, I never have had bar ends either, plus I get more torque climbing hills with flatbars. If you hunched way over with a lot of weight on your hands you will have pain, the object is to get in a riding position where your weight is more towards the seat.

If anyone wants flatbars and is concerned about hand positions, there's many flat bar options out there that give you multi hand positions too.
Drop bars put your hands in a more natural position when riding on the hoods. With flat bars, you need to get a North Roads type bar to replicate that hand position. Additionally, driop bars give the rider 4 to 5 hand positions and three riding positions. In the drops with fingers on the brifters, in the drops with hands resting on the bottom of the bars, on the bends, on the hoods, and on the tops. And the three riding positions are upright, normal, and aggressive. Flat bar setups are limiting to one or two hand positions and one riding position. There are alternatives to flat bars such as north roads bars, albatross bars, butterfly bars, and Jones bars that are improvements on the basic flat bar.

Fwiw, I rode a flat bar bike for years and finally fixed my chronic neck pain when I switched to drop bars. The problem with flat bars was, I couldn't set the bars quite right. They were either too high, or too low.

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Old 11-14-17, 02:17 PM   #71
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I do like the beefy tire of the toughroad
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Old 11-14-17, 02:32 PM   #72
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[QUOTE=Juggy_Gales;19992996]I do like the beefy tire of the toughroad[/bQUOTE]
To each his own. But if you want fast, just know that tire weight is important. Those huge beefy tires might be just the thing on a rough trail, but seriously overkill on pavement, where IMO anything larger than 38 mm is completely unnecessary counterproductive even if you want to go fast. I would say for general use on pavement, tire size of 28 to 38 mm is what I go with, with 700 X 32 being the sweet spot, and no tread.
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Old 11-14-17, 02:53 PM   #73
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Im ok with some tread because I will be going on dirt trails.. they tend to have lots of pebbles etc..
Not to mention.. Im a big boy.. the security of a berfy tire is helpful to me..
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Old 11-14-17, 04:22 PM   #74
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Im ok with some tread because I will be going on dirt trails.. they tend to have lots of pebbles etc..
Not to mention.. Im a big boy.. the security of a berfy tire is helpful to me..
So am I. Trust me. 32 mm is plenty secure, even for light trail riding. I use Continental GP4000s ii 28 mm size for pavement, and I switch to Panaracer Gravel kings 32 mm for crushed limestone and gravel trails.

Rotating weight is actually kind of important for speed, or more accurately, acceleration. More important than weight in general. And the tires are on the outer part of the wheel so more weight there is felt a lot more than, say, more weight at the hub .

So, what is the difference in weight between a lighter 32 mm tire and a heavier 50 mm tire? a lot. Your basic light weight folding bead 32 mm tire weighs about 300 gms. If you go with something light, you can even shave that down to maybe 250 gms. So 32 mm tires will weigh about 500 to 600 gms for two tires. Now, IDK the exact weight of the Giant tire on the Fast road but using the Schwalbe Big Apple as a benchmark, the 50 mm size weighs in at a whopping 878 gms, or 1756 gms for two tires, or 1,200 gms of extra tire you are hauling around. That is 2.6 lbs of extra tire you are hauling around that you don't need most of the time. And that isn't counting the weight of the extra high volume inner tubes.

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Old 11-14-17, 05:21 PM   #75
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I ordered the Toughroad slr 2. Will prob be here by weekend
Or at most.. Monday..
They are putting a 48 tooth big Cog on crankset for me
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