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What Makes a Bike Hybrid?

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What Makes a Bike Hybrid?

Old 02-05-18, 08:24 PM
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bkentr
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What Makes a Bike Hybrid?

Is it just new bikes that don't fit into another class?

Taking a good road bike and adding flat bars?

Something that's "in between" ?

BMX frame with gears, higher seat and handlebars?

What?


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Old 02-05-18, 09:33 PM
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It is a hybrid of road and MTB. Less aggressive geometry than road bike and mostly has flat bars. But not as unroadworthy as an MTB. Gearing mostly has MTB groupsets, but with taller gearing (but lower than road bike). tires are wider than roadbike, and have more profile. but typically thinner tires than MTB and typically not knobby.

One could say best of both worlds, or worst of both worlds. It is faster than MTB, but slower than road bike. Can go more off road than a road bike, but less than MTB. There is a grayzone of hybrids with (mostly useless) suspension forks.

I use mine for gravel bikepaths, forrested bike paths (outside the city pavement ends on bikepaths). Our roads are in bad shape, and have crazy drivers, so i couldn't take advantage of a faster road bike (at lest not in enjoyable way). I once took it on a real MTB trail, but convinced myself I would break it.
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Old 02-05-18, 09:45 PM
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That is kinda what i was thinking they were, good and clear explanation.

Haven't riders been changing or modifying bikes to fit their needs or riding style for years?
Do those count to, or just what is for sale new ?
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Old 02-05-18, 10:24 PM
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Originally Posted by bkentr View Post
That is kinda what i was thinking they were, good and clear explanation.

Haven't riders been changing or modifying bikes to fit their needs or riding style for years?
Do those count to, or just what is for sale new ?
Many gray areas, it is not a solid line between the categories. There are flatbar road bikes. roadbikes with wider tires. Maybe hybrids with drop bar? Hybrids with suspension fork. Hybrids that are like Trail MTB. MTB with rigid forks. And this is just what manufacturers offer. Then add riders that modify gearing, convert handlebar to drop bar and vice versa, add suspension forks (or add rigid forks), replace tire types to wider or skinnier.....
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Old 02-05-18, 11:55 PM
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Well, whatever they are called, grey included, I'm all for it.

Why not ride a bike that fits. Fits your size, shape, riding style, etc, and expresses personal choice.

Not in the market for a high end bike, costs too much for my budget, but that doesn't stop me from
having bikes to ride that fit, and are tailored to what works for me.

Not a hybrid by the above descriptions, a favorite build for me is starting with a BMX frame, redish the rear
wheel, or lace in cassette, to add gears, do whatever it takes to raise the handlebars and seat up to match the size needed, and add a comfortable seat.

Been building those since1985. Been calling them "fun bikes".
Not intended for long rides, keep other bikes around for those, but built and used for the fun of riding around.

Like the way young kids ride around. They don't need to be "going anywhere" to enjoy riding around.

Thanks for your reply.

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Old 02-06-18, 02:52 PM
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must be winter ...
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Old 02-06-18, 02:53 PM
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It cross bred with a banjo player..
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Old 02-06-18, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by bkentr View Post
Well, whatever they are called, grey included, I'm all for it.

Why not ride a bike that fits. Fits your size, shape, riding style, etc, and expresses personal choice.

Not in the market for a high end bike, costs too much for my budget, but that doesn't stop me from
having bikes to ride that fit, and are tailored to what works for me.

Not a hybrid by the above descriptions, a favorite build for me is starting with a BMX frame, redish the rear
wheel, or lace in cassette, to add gears, do whatever it takes to raise the handlebars and seat up to match the size needed, and add a comfortable seat.

Been building those since1985. Been calling them "fun bikes".
Not intended for long rides, keep other bikes around for those, but built and used for the fun of riding around.

Like the way young kids ride around. They don't need to be "going anywhere" to enjoy riding around.

Thanks for your reply.

bkentr
Would you happen to have a photo of one of those?
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Old 02-06-18, 06:28 PM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
must be winter ...
Yep.

Next up (as we move closer to Spring): waving threads, followed by 'I blew by a roadie ... ' threads.
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Old 02-07-18, 11:03 AM
  #10  
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A photo I can find.

Disclaimer: These bike are NOT meant for jumps, trick riding, racing or thrashing. 5 to 10 mph average.

Disclaimer 2 : Just because I find these bikes fun to build and ride, That does NOT mean that I expect
the rest of the cycling community, or anyone else, to agree.

Fact : I have not ever had anyone who tried riding one of these to reject the breed. A more common reaction
is surprise, and or delight. Sorry, popcorn does not come with the ride.

bkentr - AKA -Banjokent
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Old 02-07-18, 11:18 AM
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The blue one is a Diamond-Goose-GT-type, from the parts used. One of the first made in 1985.
Has had 3 paint jobs, and now needs another, since the paint was baked in last years fire. Turned purple ish.

The early builds used tall stems found on the 6" wheeled scooters that were around for a while.

Have used nearly anything that would work for tall seat posts. One even had an old 12 gauge barrel.

The later builds have extended or spliced stems or steer tubes. Always put some kind of reinforcing or double tubes
with plug welding, as well as butt welding.

A few of the seat posts are thick walled stainless pipe recycled from a boats bow/safety railing. 3/16" walls.

Another method used for seat posts it to splice in or add a seat tube from a road or MTB .

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Old 02-07-18, 12:23 PM
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Kentr, that's pretty interesting! BMX bikes built for cruising by adult riders, and not X-Gamers. I like an upright riding style as much as anyone else, but those must ride REALLY upright, with the short top tubes and tall handlebar.
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Old 02-07-18, 09:11 PM
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Looks can be deceiving, and the too high look is magnified by the 20" wheels.

The riding position is very close to the same one I use for all the bikes I set up,test ride, then If a bike is for someone else, I'll change the ride fit to whatever is needed.

When set side by side to a 26" wheeled bike, the handlebars and seat very nearly match each other.
the small bikes are a bit lower.

A back injury in 1979 stopped me from riding with drop bars, or leaning forward. i have very short legs, and a
longer torso, which adds to the "look" of having the bars so high.

i aim for the same riding position for any bike I ride.
Using straight bars, when sitting "upright", most all weight on seat, i can just hold the bars with fingertips,
then to gain some small amount of power, i can lean forward enough to fully grip the grips.

This is the riding position that has been worked out over time that works for me, even when having a "episode"
of back pain.

I find it an odd thing, but am grateful for it, that even when the back thing was at it's worst, i could still
ride, If i could "mount up", and pedal off. Riding was and is a good therapy.

Back in 1974 I did have a bike with sew ups, and understand first hand how a lightweight bike with low rolling
resistance can and will ride much faster and longer with the same amount of effort.
i do not recommend taking one of these for a long ride, even with gears. Around the block,or up to around 10 miles
at a time is fine. Several short rides a day, weather permitting, works fine.

not that it matters much, but I did have a valid reason to start building these back in 1985.
i have been calling them "fun bikes" for lack of a better name.

Fortunately, it's possible to have several bikes around.

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Old 02-08-18, 04:14 PM
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Your riding position doesn't sound all that different from mine. Hybrids are my main squeeze because of it!
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Old 02-09-18, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by bkentr View Post

Fact : I have not ever had anyone who tried riding one of these to reject the breed. A more common reaction
is surprise, and or delight. Sorry, popcorn does not come with the ride.
I'd try it.

It's hard to find a bike that's legitimately miserable to ride, at least for a short distance. I mean I wouldn't ride this bike of yours on a 3 day excision through the mountains, but around town it looks like fun.

Pretty much anything that moves can be fun to ride or drive.

Hell up until this year my daughter rode a tiny bike with 12 inch wheels. She laughed her butt off when I'd get on it and ride it around the drive way. Even that was fun for 2 minutes.
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Old 02-09-18, 07:40 PM
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Hi Skip,
You are certainly welcome to try one out.
Free test rides is one reason I keep a few of those around even when I can only ride one bike at a time.

i would not ride one more than a few miles at a time either, or recommend doing so.

But for "playtime" riding, they can be fun.

Back when my kids were young, and the cousins were also, I put together about a dozen, one for each of us,
we would all go to a local school yard and ride around the buildings and playground. That worked.

Had a small track in the back yard, with paved walkways. That worked.

At the time we were living right next to SF bay, and two blocks to the bike trail along the bay. Went often.
About 2 miles from the Marina just south of SF International, went to watch the boats, and jets landing,
that worked too.

Now live in what passes for downtown in Veneta, a smaller suburb with lots of city streets to ride circles around.
That works also.

There are several 1 to 3 mile loops that start right out my yard gate that I make use of.
It's easy to make "laps" to add a few miles.

That kind of riding is enough for me right now.
There are some days I'll take each bike down, check or fill the air, and make a lap or two with each one.
Have around a dozen bikes of all sizes around most of the time,
so by checking each one, some miles add up.

i did have a "better" bike with sew ups, and drop bars, back around 1974.
Went on a few rides with a club, but found out real quick that kind of riding was not for me.

I will speak up for the good folks in the club. Every one was kind, supportive, and understanding of me, a newbie,
who could not keep up, or climb.
And some one did fall back and ride with me to the end.


It's kinda cool that you have not had to ride a bike that was so crummy that it was torture.

However, I have ridden a few.
Sometimes the word gets out that "Kent has been playing with bikes again", and they start in bring me bikes to
fix. Most of the time I do not mind, even when i know they are just trying to get them fixed for cheap.

But then here comes the huffys, junk kids bikes, or worse. And the "story". "I bought it brand new, just needs
air in the tires", or, "These were working great just last year, just needs a tune up".

So I keep wondering why people keep on leaving their bikes out in the rain over the winter, with flat tires that crack, till the chain rusts solid, the cable housings fill with water, and most of the bearings are frozen up and then
expect a "tuned up" bike, that rides better than it did when new, and only want to pay 20 or 30 bucks for
the work.
Sorry, just venting. But many of those bikes were, and still are, torture to repair, and Not fun to ride.

These "fun bikes" i have been assembling are strong and dependable, ride smooth and solid, and use the effort
put in to reach the ground, not just soaked up by soft spongy metal, and rusty bearings.

True, they are heavy, and the smaller wheels, and wider tires won't roll with the same ease as a high pressure
lightweight will.

That's why a body needs to have multiple bikes.
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Old 02-10-18, 12:58 PM
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Hi again,

Will this bike fit the "Hybrid" definition when finished ?

Old flat bar road bike with fatter tires , and gel saddle ?

The goal is to end up with a comfortable, sized to fit me, mid weight bike, for under $200.
Casual rides only.
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